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Integrated Treatment for Co-occurring disorders
 

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  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy
  • And if I may, NAADAC has several webinars scheduled for 2011. You can see the list of topics here. They range from co-occurring disorders to becoming an SAP, to clinical supervision. Each of these webinars is free to participants and will offer 2 continuing education credits. More information about these and so much more on our website, www.naadac.org/education.
  • And if I may, NAADAC has several webinars scheduled for 2011. You can see the list of topics here. They range from co-occurring disorders to becoming an SAP, to clinical supervision. Each of these webinars is free to participants and will offer 2 continuing education credits. More information about these and so much more on our website, www.naadac.org/education.
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy TIME: 4:45pm - 5:00pm - You have 15 minutes to have the participants complete all the required surveys and evaluations.
  • New Horizons: Integrating Motivational Styles, Strategies and Skills with Pharmacotherapy TIME: 4:45pm - 5:00pm - You have 15 minutes to have the participants complete all the required surveys and evaluations.

Integrated Treatment for Co-occurring disorders Integrated Treatment for Co-occurring disorders Presentation Transcript

  • Integrating Treatment for Co-Occurring Disorders Brought to you by:
  • Presented By
  • TODAY’S PRESENTERS Cynthia Moreno Tuohy Executive Director NAADAC, The Association for Addiction Professionals Misti Storie Education and Training Consultant NAADAC, The Association for Addiction Professionals
  • TODAY’S PRESENTERS Tim Sheehan, Ph.D. Director of Institutional Effectiveness Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies Mary Woods, RNC, LADC, MSHS Chief Executive Officer Westbridge Community Services
  • WEB CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES
    • Discuss the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in substance abuse treatment programs
  • WEB CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES
    • Discuss the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in substance abuse treatment programs
    • Contrast co-occurring treatment with traditional addiction treatment
  • WEB CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES
    • Discuss the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in substance abuse treatment programs
    • Contrast co-occurring treatment with traditional addiction treatment
    • Give a rationale for integrated treatment
  • WEB CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES
    • Discuss the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in substance abuse treatment programs
    • Contrast co-occurring treatment with traditional addiction treatment
    • Give a rationale for integrated treatment
    • List instruments helpful for screening
  • WEB CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES
    • Discuss the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in substance abuse treatment programs
    • Contrast co-occurring treatment with traditional addiction treatment
    • Give a rationale for integrated treatment
    • List instruments helpful for screening
    • Describe evidence-based therapies helpful in treating co-occurring disorders
  • WEB CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES
    • Discuss the prevalence of co-occurring disorders in substance abuse treatment programs
    • Contrast co-occurring treatment with traditional addiction treatment
    • Give a rationale for integrated treatment
    • List instruments helpful for screening
    • Describe evidence-based therapies helpful in treating co-occurring disorders
    • Access new training programs available through NAADAC and Hazelden
    • Part One:
    Introduction to Co-occurring Disorders
  • SCOPE OF PRACTICE
    • An Addiction Professional’s scope of practice varies with education, training and state requirements.
    • With over 300 people on line today, each practitioner should keep his or her scope of practice in mind as we conduct this presentation.
  • DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
    • 50 to 75% of all clients who are receiving treatment for a substance use disorder also have another diagnosable mental health disorder .
    • Further, of all psychiatric clients with a mental health disorder, 25 to 50% of them also currently have or had a substance use disorder at some point in their lives.
    • Co-morbidity of Substance Use and Psychiatric Disorders
    • Among a sample of about 10,000 adults:
    • 13.5% had an alcohol use disorder. Of those, 36.6% also had a psychiatric disorder.
    • 6.1% had a drug use disorder. Of those, 53.1% also had a psychiatric disorder.
    • 22.5% had a psychiatric disorder. Of those, 28.9% also had an alcohol or drug use disorder.
    DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS Source: Regier et al. 1990
    • Psychiatric Disorders in Addiction Treatment
    • Two studies of Prevalence rates in addiction treatment settings had similar findings. Persons with substance use disorders are also like to have mood and anxiety disorders.
    DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS Source: Cacciola et al, 2001; Ross, Glaser and Germanson 1988
  • DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS Addiction Treatment Provider Estimates by Psychiatric Disorder
    • Mental health disorder (MHD) :
    • significant and chronic disturbances with “feelings, thinking, functioning and/or relationships that are not due to drug or alcohol use and are not the result of a medical illness” 22
    DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
    • Bipolar disorder
    • Major depressive disorder
    • Schizophrenia
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
    • Social phobia
    • Borderline personality disorder
    • Posttraumatic stress disorder
    • Substance use disorder (SUD) :
    • a behavioral pattern of continual psychoactive substance use that can be diagnosed as either substance abuse or substance dependence
    DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
    • Co-occurring disorders (COD) :
    • the simultaneous existence of “one or more disorders relating to the use of alcohol and/or other drugs of abuse as well as one or more mental [health] disorders.” 18
    DEFINING CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
  • SEVERITY OF CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
    • Co-occurring mental health disorders are often placed on a continuum of severity.
      • Non-severe: early in the continuum and can include mood disorders, anxiety disorders, adjustment disorders and personality disorders.
      • Severe: include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder and major depressive disorder.
  • SEVERITY OF CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
    • The classification of “severe and non-severe” is based on a specific diagnosis and by state criteria for Medicaid qualification but can vary significantly based on severity of the disability and the duration of the disorder.
  • QUADRANTS OF CARE
    • Part Two:
    What is Co-occurring Treatment and How is It Different from Traditional Addiction Treatment?
  • MODELS OF TREATMENT
    • Clients with co-occurring disorders have historically received substance abuse treatment services in isolation from mental health treatment services.
    • As more research on co-occurring disorders began to be conducted, the many limitations this approach places on the client and his or her success in treatment began to surface.
  • MODELS OF TREATMENT
    • A twenty-eight year-old-woman named Anita entered an addiction treatment center where she was assessed as having alcohol dependence. Six months earlier, Anita had been diagnosed with major depressive disorder and was prescribed medication by her family doctor. At the treatment facility, it was recommended that Anita be re-assessed and treated, if necessary, at a mental health clinic, located nearby in town. What model of treatment does this scenario represent?
      • single model of treatment
      • sequential model of treatment
      • parallel model of treatment
      • integrated model of treatment
    • Single model of care - It was believed that once the “primary disorder" was treated effectively, the client’s substance use problem would resolve itself because drugs and/or alcohol were no longer needed to cope.
    • Sequential model of treatment - acknowledges the presence of co-occurring disorders but treats them one at a time.
    • Parallel model of treatment - mental health disorders are treated at the same time as co-occurring substance use disorders, only by separate treatment professionals and often at separate treatment facilities.
    MODELS OF TREATMENT
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
      • Integrated model of treatment
    • an approach to treating co-occurring disorders that utilizes one competent treatment team at the same facility to recognize and address all mental health and substance use disorders at the same time.
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
      • Comprehensiveness
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
      • Comprehensiveness
      • Assertiveness
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
      • Comprehensiveness
      • Assertiveness
      • Reduction of negative consequences
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
      • Comprehensiveness
      • Assertiveness
      • Reduction of negative consequences
      • Long-term perspective
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
      • Comprehensiveness
      • Assertiveness
      • Reduction of negative consequences
      • Long-term perspective
      • Motivation-based treatment
  • INTEGRATED MODEL OF TREATMENT
    • The integrated model of treatment can best be defined by following seven components:
      • Integration
      • Comprehensiveness
      • Assertiveness
      • Reduction of negative consequences
      • Long-term perspective
      • Motivation-based treatment
      • Multiple psychotherapeutic modalities
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
      • Reduced frustration for clients
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
      • Reduced frustration for clients
      • Shared decision-making responsibilities
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
      • Reduced frustration for clients
      • Shared decision-making responsibilities
      • Families and significant others are included
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
      • Reduced frustration for clients
      • Shared decision-making responsibilities
      • Families and significant others are included
      • Transparent practices help everyone involved share responsibility
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
      • Reduced frustration for clients
      • Shared decision-making responsibilities
      • Families and significant others are included
      • Transparent practices help everyone involved share responsibility
      • Clients are empowered to treat their own illness and manage their own recovery
  • BENEFITS OF AN INTEGRATED MODEL OF CARE
    • Benefits of an Integrated Model of Care
      • Reduced need for coordination
      • Reduced frustration for clients
      • Shared decision-making responsibilities
      • Families and significant others are included
      • Transparent practices help everyone involved share responsibility
      • Clients are empowered to treat their own illness and manage their own recovery
      • The client and his/her family has more choice in treatment, more ability for self-management, and a higher satisfaction with care
    • One disorder does not necessarily present as “primary.”
    • There isn’t necessarily a causal relationship between co-occurring disorders.
    • These are co-occurring brain diseases that need to be treated simultaneously .
    CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS INTERACTIONS An integrated model of care assumes that:
  • SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT Screening : The first phase of evaluation where the potential client is interviewed to determine if he or she is appropriate for that specific treatment facility and to determine the possible presence or absence of a substance use or mental health problem.
  • SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT Assessment: The second phase of evaluation where a systematic interview is necessary to verify the potential presence of a mental health or substance use disorder detected during the screening process.
  • SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Intoxication
    • Withdrawal
    • Substance-induced disorders
    • Motivational factors
    • Feelings, symptoms, and disorders
    Complexities of Screening and Assessment
  • CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS INTERACTIONS
    • Substances and Negative Emotions
  • SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • The choice of screening measures depends on:
      • The skill of the screening professional
      • The cost of the screening materials
      • How simple the scale is to interpret and use across disciplines
      • Psychometric qualities
      • The relevance of screening to prevalent disorders
      • Movement from very sensitive (generic) measures to more specific measures
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Engage the Client
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Engage the Client
    • Identify and Contact Collaterals
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Engage the Client
    • Identify and Contact Collaterals
    • Screen for and Detect Co-occurring Disorders
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Engage the Client
    • Identify and Contact Collaterals
    • Screen for and Detect Co-occurring Disorders
    • Determine Quadrant and Locus of Responsibility
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Engage the Client
    • Identify and Contact Collaterals
    • Screen for and Detect Co-occurring Disorders
    • Determine Quadrant and Locus of Responsibility
    • Determine Level of Care
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Engage the Client
    • Identify and Contact Collaterals
    • Screen for and Detect Co-occurring Disorders
    • Determine Quadrant and Locus of Responsibility
    • Determine Level of Care
    • Determine Diagnosis
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Determine Disability and Functional Impairment
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Determine Disability and Functional Impairment
    • Identify Strengths and Supports
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Determine Disability and Functional Impairment
    • Identify Strengths and Supports
    • Identify Cultural and Linguistic Needs and Supports
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Determine Disability and Functional Impairment
    • Identify Strengths and Supports
    • Identify Cultural and Linguistic Needs and Supports
    • Identify Problem Domains
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Determine Disability and Functional Impairment
    • Identify Strengths and Supports
    • Identify Cultural and Linguistic Needs and Supports
    • Identify Problem Domains
    • Determine Stage of Change
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • Integrated Assessment Process – 12 Steps
    • Determine Disability and Functional Impairment
    • Identify Strengths and Supports
    • Identify Cultural and Linguistic Needs and Supports
    • Identify Problem Domains
    • Determine Stage of Change
    • Plan Treatment
    SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT
    • American Society of Addiction Medicine Patient Placement Criteria – 2 nd Edition Revised (ASAM PPC-2R) dimensions of care
      • Dimension 1: Acute Intoxication and/or Withdrawal Potential
      • Dimension 2: Biomedical Conditions and Complications
      • Dimension 3: Emotional, Behavioral or Cognitive Conditions and Complications
      • Dimension 4: Readiness to Change
      • Dimension 5: Relapse, Continued Use or Continued Problem Potential
      • Dimension 6: Recovery/Living Environment
    DETERMINING LEVEL OF CARE
      • Level I: Outpatient treatment.
      • Level II: Intensive outpatient treatment, including partial hospitalization.
      • Level III: Residential/medically monitored intensive inpatient treatment.
      • Level IV: Medically managed intensive inpatient treatment.
    DETERMINING LEVEL OF CARE
  • EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES
    • In most treatment addiction centers, the three primary evidence-based practices used are:
      • motivational enhancement therapy (MET)
      • cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
      • twelve step facilitation (TSF)
    • All of these treatment models are widely used – often without formal training – by addiction professionals around the country and can be easily applied to clients suffering from co-occurring disorders.
  • EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES
    • The Integrated Combined Therapies model combines these three EBPs (Evidence-Based Practices) into a stage-wise treatment plan whereby:
      • motivational enhancement therapy is first utilized to initiate change and engage the client in the therapeutic process;
      • cognitive-behavioral therapy is then used to help make change within the client; and
      • twelve step facilitation is essential to helping maintain and sustain changes .
  • STAGES OF CHANGE/ STAGES OF TREATMENT
  • STAGES OF CHANGE/ STAGES OF TREATMENT STAGES OF CHANGE/ STAGES OF TREATMENT
  • STAGES OF CHANGE/ STAGES OF TREATMENT
  • STAGES OF CHANGE/ STAGES OF TREATMENT
  • OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
      • Managing Medications
      • Involving the Family
      • Encouraging Participation in Peer-Support Recovery Programs
  • Collaboration with the prescriber
    • Even though the prescriber is ultimately responsible for ensuring safety and effectiveness of pharmacotherapies, addiction professionals can also help in this effort.
    • Since addiction professionals tend to see the client more often, they are well-positioned to:
      • recognize danger signs (including recent psychoactive substance use)
      • recognize abnormal side effects
      • monitor and support medication compliance
  • MANAGING MEDICATIONS
    • Pharmacotherapy can only work if medications are taken as prescribed.
    • Some clients with co-occurring disorders are required to manage a regimen of multiple medications each day.
    • Clients often have difficulty strictly adhering to a dosing schedule, making them more prone to relapse and hospitalization.
    • Clinicians can help prepare clients to manage their medications.
  • INVOLVING THE CLIENT’S FAMILY
    • It is a myth that people with co-occurring disorders are disconnected from their families.
    • Research has shown that outcomes for substance use and mental health disorders are improved, including fewer relapses, when families are actively engaged in the treatment process.
    • Unfortunately, family members of a client who has co-occurring disorders often experience considerable stress, heartbreak, and confusion.
    Involving families in treatment
  • INVOLVING THE CLIENT’S FAMILY
    • Involving families in treatment
    • Encourage family member involvement and develop a collaborative relationship as early as possible in the treatment process
    • Use an evidence-based practice for family treatment
    • Encourage families to attend self-help groups such as Al-Anon and NAMI
    • Double Trouble in Recovery
    • Mental Illness Anonymous
    • Dual Disorders Anonymous
    • Dual Recovery Anonymous
    • Dual Diagnosis Anonymous
    DUAL-RECOVERY MUTUAL SELF-HELP Specific dual-recovery groups can provide essential peer support:
  • GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF RECOVERY
    • There are many pathways to recovery.
    • Recovery is self-directed and empowering, involving personal recognition of the need for change and transformation.
    • Recovery exists on a continuum of improved health and wellness.
    • Recovery involves addressing discrimination and transcending shame and stigma.
    • Recovery is supported by peers and allies, and involves joining and rebuilding a life in the community.
    • Recovery is a reality.
    • (from CSAT ’ s Regional Recovery Meetings, May 2008)
    • Part Three
    Resources and Training Opportunities
  • CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS PROGRAM from Dartmouth/Hazelden Written by the faculty from the Dartmouth   Medical School, CDP provides practical tools for implementing evidence-based, integrated treatment   practices.
  • CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS PROGRAM from Dartmouth/Hazelden
    • Clinical Administrator ’ s Guide    
    • Curriculum 1: Screening and Assessment        
    • Curriculum 2: Integrating Combined Therapies    
    • Curriculum 3: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy      
    • Curriculum 4: Medication Management      
    • Curriculum 5: Family Program        
    • DVD A Guide for Living with Co-occurring Disorders
    Components of CDP include: Training and technical assistance is available for all components: Call 1-800-328-9000, ext. 4672 or e-mail training@hazelden.org
  • NAADAC/HAZELDEN COURSE Integrating Treatment for Co-occurring Disorders: An Introduction to What Every Addiction Counselor Needs to Know … is a skill-based training program that will help addiction counselors improve their ability to assist clients who have co-occurring disorders, within their scope of practice.
  • NAADAC/HAZELDEN COURSE
    • Through case studies, video presentations, interactive exercises and extensive written resources, participants learn:
      • the many myths related to mental illness treatment
      • barriers to assessing and treating co-occurring disorders
      • relevant research and prevalence data
      • commonly encountered mental disorders
      • applicable screening and assessment instruments
      • issues surrounding medication management
      • coordinating with other mental health professionals
      • the integrated model of mental health and addiction treatment services
    • NAADAC is now conducting the Lifelong Learning Program: Integrating Treatment for Co-occurring Disorders: An Introduction to What Every Addiction Counselor Needs To Know
    • Check the NAADAC website for trainings coming to your area at www.naadac.org
    NAADAC/HAZELDEN COURSE Interested in hosting a training? Contact: Diana Kamp dkamp@naadac.org Cynthia Moreno Tuohy moreno@naadac.org
    • Now available as a distance learning program!
    • Integrating Treatment for Co-Occurring Co-occurring Disorders: An Introduction to What Every Addiction Counselor Needs to Know.
    • Learn at your own pace through presentations, videos, case studies, and interactive exercises.
    • Available 24/7. $180.00
    • 18 CEs from NAADAC; 6 CEs from APA
    NAADAC/HAZELDEN COURSE
  • LEADERSHIP IN CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS
    • Announcing the Focus on Integrated Recovery!
    • A collaboration between:
    • Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center
    • Hazelden
    • NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals
    • NAATP, the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers
    • The National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare
    • SAMHSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and
    • WestBridge Community Services
    • Active discussions with other leaders
  • FOCUS ON INTEGRATED RECOVERY
    • Co-Occurring Leadership
    • What you can expect from Focus on Integrated Recovery
    • Practical, evidence-based resources to aid in the integration of the substance use and mental health disorders professions
    • Centralized source for consistent messaging about co-occurring disorders
    • Ongoing mechanism to capture the learning and experiences from partners and constituents across the behavioral health spectrum
    • Opportunities for in-person and distance education on co-occurring disorders
    • Support for the September 2011 Recovery Month
    • Collaboration on new initiatives: evidence-based scopes of practice, outcome measurement, workforce development
  • FOCUS ON INTEGRATED RECOVERY
    • Co-Occurring Leadership
    • Where to find the Focus on Integrated Recovery
    • Communications begin during September, 2011 Recovery Month
      • National Public Relations efforts
      • E-mail campaigns
      • Focus on Integrated Recovery Website
      • Links on the partners’ websites
      • Recovery Month materials
    • Let us know what you think and how we can help!
    • contact Jon Hartman - jhartman@hazelden.org
    • August 18, 2011 - Strategies for Successful Test Taking
    • September 15, 2011 - Your Voice Counts: Advocacy and the NAADAC Political Action Committee
    • October 13, 2011 - Conflict Resolution for Clients and Professionals
    • November 17, 2011 - What's Next in Your Career? Recap and Highlights from the NAADAC Workforce Conference
    • December 15, 2011 - Clinical Supervision: Keys to Success
    • Register at: www.naadac.org/education or www.myaccucare.com/webinars
    UPCOMING WEBINARS 2011
    • Alcohol SBIRT: Integrating Evidence-based Practice Into Your Practice
    • Medication Assisted Recovery: What Every Addiction Professional Needs to Know
    • Build Your Business With the Department of Transportation Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) Qualification
    • Working with NAADAC to Express Your Professional Identity
    • Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)
    • Medicaid Expansion 2014 and Preparing to Bill for Medicaid
    • Understanding NAADAC’s Code of Ethics
    • Staying Informed: Trends of the Addiction Profession
    • Archived webinars located at: www.naadac.org/education or www.myaccucare.com/webinars
    ARCHIVED WEBINARS
    • Time for discussion!
    • www.naadac.org
    • www.bhevolution.org
    • www.hazelden.org
    • www.westbridge.org
  • Providing solutions to improve the quality of life for communities by helping addictions professionals excel in their field through the use of information technology. Visit us today! Call: (800) 324-7966 Click: www.MyAccuCare.com Clinical Administrative Outcome Reporting Billing
    • The education delivered in this webinar is FREE to all professionals.
    • 2 CEs are FREE to NAADAC members and AccuCare subscribers who attend this webinar. Non-members of NAADAC or non-subscribers of AccuCare receive 2 CEs for $25.
    • If you wish to receive CE credit, you MUST download, complete and submit the “CE Quiz” that is located at:
      • www.myaccucare.com/webinars
      • www.naadac.org/education
    • A CE certificate will be emailed to you within 30 days.
    • Successfully passing the “CE Quiz” is the ONLY way to receive a CE certificate.
    OBTAINING CE CREDIT
    • Thank you for participating!
    • www.naadac.org
    • www.bhevolution.org
    • www.hazelden.org
    • www.westbridge.org
    • www.myaccucare.com
    • Misti - misti@naadac.org
    • Emily - ehaverty@orionhealthcare.com