• Like
Raphael Art and Life
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
Uploaded on

 

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,443
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
75
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • His career falls naturally into three phases and three styles, first described by Giorgio Vasari: his early years in Umbria, then a period of about four years (from 1504-1508) absorbing the artistic traditions of Florence, followed by his last hectic and triumphant twelve years in Rome, working for two Popes and their close associates.
  • Raphael lived in the Borgo, in rather grand style in a palace designed by Bramante. He never married, but in 1514 became engaged to Maria Bibbiena, Cardinal Medici Bibbiena's niece; he seems to have been talked into this by his friend the Cardinal, and his lack of enthusiasm seems to be shown by the marriage not taking place before she died in 1520. He is said to have had many affairs, but a permanent fixture in his life in Rome was La Fornarina, MargheritaLuti, the daughter of a baker (fornaro) named Francesco Luti from Siena who lived at Via del GovernoVecchio. He was made a "Groom of the Chamber" of the Pope, which gave him status at court and an additional income. Vasari claims he had toyed with the ambition of becoming a Cardinal, perhaps after some encouragement from Leo, which also may account for his delaying his marriage.According to Vasari, Raphael's premature death on Good Friday (April 6, 1520) (possibly his 37th birthday), was caused by a night of excessive sex with her, after which he fell into a fever and, not telling his doctors that this was its cause, was given the wrong cure, which killed him. Whatever the cause, in his acute illness, which lasted fifteen days, Raphael was composed enough to receive the last rites, and to put his affairs in order. He dictated his will, in which he left sufficient funds for his mistress's care, entrusted to his loyal servant Baviera, and left most of his studio contents to Giulio Romano and Penni. At his request, Raphael was buried in the Pantheon.
  • What is unique about Raphael? His calmer, expressive, harmonious in their gazes, anatomically correct, chubby cherubs. This is a detail from the monumental Sistine Madonna, 1515
  • Raphael was summoned to Rome by Pope Julius II in 1508.
  • Pope Julius II commanded art that verified his idea of a new world religion based on humanism,(Pope’s Signature personal study)What is High Renaissance Classicism about this work? Harmony, balance, monumentality, color, controlled cohesive design, perspective, anatomically correct, light gives three dimensionality, realistic details. Raphael wanted to create an ideal setting with murals that proclaimed human knowledge exists only under the power of divine wisdomEach Lunette has a pictorial allegory of theology, philosophy, the arts and justice
  • Centered between Plato and Aristotle.Why? Symbolizes their universal importance and unites their philosophies
  • Who is this Plato (427 - 347 BC) and who is Aristotle(384 - 322 BC) ?What is Plato holding? a copy of his Timaeus a treatise of Plato’s in the form of a Socratic dialogue, written circa 360 BC. The work puts forward speculation on the nature of the physical world. Who does it look like during Raphael’s time? This Plato is a portrait of Leonardo da Vinci.Why is he pointing up? gestures upward to the ethereal (delicate, otherworldly) realm of his philosophy questioning the true physical world.What is Aristotle holing? (He holds a copy of his Nichomachean EthicsWhy is his hand down? he indicates with his gesture the worldliness, the concreteness, which he identifies in his philosopy.
  • On the right is Nichomachusof Gerasaethics philosopher, mathematician and musician () (c. 60- c. 120 AD). Nicomachus was the author of Arithmetic Introduction. “Who is this woman in the middle?” “Hypatia, the most famous student of the School of Athens,” replied the artist. “Remove her. Knowledge of her runs counter to the belief of the faithful! Otherwise, the work is acceptable,” Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all”Hypatia (c. 350-370? – 415) ADPythagoras saw in the geometry of musical harmony a key to the order of the cosmos ("harmony of the spheres").
  • This is probably Socrates with the cup of hemlock next to him and his recumbent position recalls his teaching from his prison bed.What elements of the Renaissance does it follow. Anatomical olderfigure; appropriate negligence of its clothing.Diogenes,whose father was a banker,is seen alone and set apart from the others; a cynic in his expression, in his bearing, in his attitude. What is he reading? Diogenes, a philosopher, lived in a big barrel, instead of the traditional house. He spent his nights wandering from house to house with a lantern, knocking on peoples' doors to find out if there was "an honest human inside."
  • Where is Raphael gazing?At the viewerWhy? To draw them into the frescoWhy do you think he put himself among some of the greatest minds?
  • Euclid discusses a geometric diagram with his pupilsThe figure of Euclid is believed to be based on the likeness of the Renaissance architect Bramante who Julius II commissioned to design and build St. Peter’s basilica. Accompanying the figures of Zoroaster (back is turned and holds a terrestrial globe) and Ptolemy (holds celestial globe) is presumed to be Raphael and either Perugino (Raphael's teacher) or Sodoma (who had started painting the ceiling of the room)..
  • On the right is Nicomachus of Gerasa mathematician and musician () (c. 60- c. 120 AD). Nicomachus was the author of Arithmetic Introduction. “Who is this woman in the middle?” “Hypatia, the most famous student of the School of Athens,” replied the artist. “Remove her. Knowledge of her runs counter to the belief of the faithful! Otherwise, the work is acceptable,” Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all”Hypatia (c. 350-370? – 415) ADPythagoras saw in the geometry of musical harmony a key to the order of the cosmos ("harmony of the spheres").
  • Where is Raphael gazing?Why? Why do you think he put himself among some of the greatest minds?
  • Euclid discusses a geometric diagram with his pupilsThe figure of Euclid is believed to be based on the likeness of the Renaissance architect Bramante who Julius II commissioned to design and build St. Peter’s basilica. Accompanying the figures of Zoroaster (back is turned and holds a terrestrial globe) and Ptolemy (holds celestial globe.
  • Brooding figure represent Michelangelo more than Heraclitus. Raphael shows his beaten legs and his stone cutters bootsBecause Michelangelo wanted to be known as a sculptor not a painter
  • Therefore, everything known to man, at the time, is being discussed, except what? religion. Raphael was commended on communicating so well each figure’s purpose with his poses and expressions and gestures.
  • How is identifiable as Raphael’s? it’s in the same room, colors, anatomy, perspective, harmony , movements, On another wall in the same room is Heaven, with the Christ and the Virgin, St. John the Baptist, the Apostles, Evangelists, martyrs in the clouds, with God the Father above sending out the Holy Spirit over a number of saints who subscribe to the Mass and argue upon the Host which is on the altar. Among them are the four Doctors of the Church, surrounded by saints, including Dominic, Francis, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventura, Scotus, Nicholas of Lyra, Dante, FràGirolamo, Savonarola of Ferrara, and all the Christian theologians, including and number of portraits. In the air are four children holding open the Gospels, and it would be impossible for any painter to produce figures of more grace and perfection than these. The saints in a group in the air seem alive, and are remarkable for the foreshortening and relief. Their draperies also are varied and very beautiful, and the heads rather celestial than human, especially that of Christ, displaying all the clemency and pity which divine painting can demonstrate to mortal man." Giorgio Vasari, The Lives of the Most Excellent Architects, Painters, and Sculptors,2nd edition, Florence, 1568
  • Why is this painting a perfect expression of the art of the High Renaissance? the art of Leonardo and Michaelangelo as well as Raphael. Harmony and balance are found in Raphael's ability to stabilize the circular form of the painting with a triangular arrangement of the figures and the strong horizontal line behind them, composed of the river and trees. The Virgin's sandal acts as a break preventing the tondo (circle) from rolling.The greatest of Raphael'sMadonnas in North America, the Alba Madonna, is in the National Gallery of Art in Washington,D.C. In this "Madonna of Humility", the Virgin is seated directly on the ground, rather than on a heavenly throne.What are all three of them staring at? "The Christ Child's gesture of accepting the cross from John the Baptist is the focus of attention of all three figures as if they know of Christ's future sacrifice for mankind."Why is the pastoral atmosphere at odds with the paintings emotional significance? Pastoral, calm, harmonic, Mary is on the ground looking suspect at the cross as is Christ and St.      
  • Again how do you identify this as Raphael’s and not Leonardo?figures begin to take more dynamic and complex positions

Transcript

  • 1. Raphael
    Sanzio, (Raffeallo)
    1483-1520
    The Prince
    of Painters
  • 2. Raphael
    • Urbino, Italy
    • 3. Father described as a painter, “of no great merit”
    • 4. Introduced to Humanism at 11 years of age!
    • 5. Studied in Perugia with Peitro Perugino.
    • 6. Moved to Florence
    • 7. Studied with the masters perfecting:
    • 8. Human anatomy
    • 9. Unity of composition
    • 10. Renaissance Classicism
  • Raphael, Sistine Madonna, 1513-1514
  • 11. Raphael, Portrait of Giuliano della Rovere, Pope Julius II, Rome1511-1512,
  • 12. Raphael, Stanza dellaSegnatura, Vatican, Rome, Fresco lunettes, Parnassus and The School of Athens, 1510-1511, In Situ
  • 13. Raphael, School of Athens, Stanza dellaSegnatura, Vatican, Rome, Fresco in the left lunette, Patron Pope Julius II, 1510-1511
    In situ
  • 14.
  • 15. Plato
    427-327 BCE
    Aristotle
    384-322
    BCE
  • 16. Pythagorascalculates arithmetic. While students of all ages and gender leer over his shoulder.
  • 17. Diogenes of Sinope (412-323 BC), cynic philosopher
  • 18. Zoraster the ancient Greek astronomer listens to Ptolemy, who codified the Greek geocentric view of the universe, while Raphael and Sodoma gaze onward.
  • 19. Euclid discusses geometric diagrams
  • 20. Pythagorascalculates arithmetic. While students of all ages and gender leer over his shoulder.
  • 21. Zoraster the ancient Greek astronomer listens to Ptolemy, who codified the Greek geocentric view of the universe, while Raphael and Sodoma gaze onward.
  • 22. Euclid discusses geometric diagrams
  • 23. Heraclitus represents a Pre-Socratic Greek philosopher who scorned civil society and popular thought.
    He exemplifies the features of Michelangelo.
  • 24. Music , Math and Grammar are depicted in the foreground
    while Rhetoric and Dialect argue behind them.
  • 25.
  • 26. Raphael,Stanza dellaSegnatura, Disputa, 1510-1511, Vatican, Rome, Patron Pope Julius II
  • 27. RaphaelThe Alba Madonna, c. 1510
  • 28. Raphael, 
    Madonna of the Meadow., Rome, 1505 or 1506