Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Sex and Relationships Education for Young People with Additional Support Needs
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Sex and Relationships Education for Young People with Additional Support Needs

1,427
views

Published on

Powerpoint designed by Jane Groves for use at the Highland Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) training session for professionals working with Young People with Additional Support Needs. A course …

Powerpoint designed by Jane Groves for use at the Highland Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) training session for professionals working with Young People with Additional Support Needs. A course facilitated by Jane Groves and Louise Jones. (Copyright under Creative Commons License)

Published in: Education

1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,427
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Sex and Relationships Education for Young People with Additional Support Needs
  • 2. Four Themes
    • What is Sex and Relationships Education
    • Barriers
    • How do we deliver SRE?
    • What about the needs of staff?
  • 3. Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) is…..
    • Lifelong learning about sex, sexuality, emotions, relationships and sexual health
    • About helping children and young people acquire accurate information, develop skills and develop positive values which will guide their decision-making judgements, relationships and behaviour throughout their life.
    • Sex Education Forum Factsheet 32
  • 4. What works in SRE?
    • Trained educators
    • Active participatory methods
    • Not just information, - norms, attitudes and skills as well
    • Work on beliefs and self-efficacy
    • Focus on risk reduction
    • Exploration of social influences and pressures
    • Increased skills and confidence
  • 5. Which methods work best in teaching SRE
    • Active methods and appropriate communication techniques can be combined
    • Circle work, storytelling, mime and role play enable skills to be practised and are fund
    • Repetition is crucial
  • 6. Does SRE encourage sexual activity?
    • WHO discovered:
    • No evidence of SRE leading to earlier or increased sexual activity
    • Often leads to a delay in onset
    • Access to counselling and contraceptive services did not encourage earlier or increased sexual activity
    • Often lead to the adoption of safer practices
  • 7.
    • Programmes promoting both postponement and protected sex are more effective than those promoting abstinence alone
    • Schools-based SRE programmes are more effective before young people become sexually active, and when emphasising skills and social norms rather than knowledge.
    • Sex education does not promote earlier or increased sexual activity in young people
  • 8. How can we work with Parents and Carers?
    • Many parents and carers are concerned about their child’s sexuality and some may be reluctant to accept it.
    • Some parents and carers fear that their child may be exploited
    • These anxieties may peak when a child reaches puberty
    • Concerns can be reduced if the child’s sexual development is addressed as a natural part of home-school links, rather than at crisis point
    • Schools can help by lending resources and running workshops
  • 9. Barriers
    • Disability and sex is still a taboo subject within our society
    • This creates many barriers for young disabled people including people with learning difficulties
  • 10. Barriers
    • Lack of positive images and role models
    • Segregated environments and transport
    • Relative lack of privacy
    • Inaccessible sexual health services
    • Lack of sex and relationships education
  • 11. Lack of positive images
    • Media images perpetuate the idea that people should aspire to ‘the body beautiful’
    • Many young disabled people grow up with negative perceptions of their own sexuality
  • 12. Barriers to forming relationships
    • Many young disabled people do not have opportunities to socialise due to:
    • Segregated education
    • Inaccessible transport
    • Inaccessible community and leisure facilities
  • 13. Barriers to forming intimate relationships
    • The routine assistance that some disabled people need in their everyday lives may make it difficult for them to find privacy for intimate relationships
    • Lack of appropriate and accessible sexual health services
  • 14.
    • ‘Whatever our gender, ability, culture, faith, sexuality and family background, we are all sexual beings, with the same needs for good and appropriate SRE. Children and young people with learning difficulties have the same rights as their peers to education, information, dignity and respect.’
    • Sex Education Matters, SEF 204
  • 15.
    • Mainstream and special schools ‘have a duty to ensure that children with special educational needs and learning difficulties are properly included in sex and relationships education.’
    • SRE Guidance, DfES 2000
  • 16. How to Protect Staff
    • Involve parents in the SRE programme
    • Keep parents informed about SRE teaching sessions
    • Have two or more adults present when teaching SRE
    • Record and report any inappropriate touches, and all accidents, injuries and allegations to the line manager or designated child protection teacher
  • 17.
    • Enourage independence in self-help skills
    • Be mindful of how you touch children
    • Encourage appropriate behaviour
    • In a school or care setting do not spend excessive amounts of time with one child
    • In a residential setting never take a child or children into your bedroom alone
    • Do not take children to your home along.
  • 18. Why SRE is important
    • All young people should be entitled to good quality SRE. Additional reasons for young disabled people include:
    • Understanding the barriers they may face around relationships and sex as they grow up
    • Space to explore issues specific to them such as prejudices around having children
    • Developing a sense of worth as a sexual being and potentially enjoying future sex lives.