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Beschrijving Beroepsonderwijs en volwasseneducatie Twente

Beschrijving Beroepsonderwijs en volwasseneducatie Twente

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  • The image foreigners have of the Netherlands (mainly the older people)
  • The four levels of qualification in vocational education and related courses Level 1: carrying out simple practical tasks. This objective relates to the training of assistants, it lasts between six months and one year, and does not require entrance qualifications. This training programme fulfils the labour market requirement for certificate holders at level one, and offers participants who are unable to obtain an initial qualification the opportunity of joining the labour market as a qualified employee. Progression routes: to basic vocational education. Level 2: carrying out practical tasks. This is the basic vocational qualification route that lasts between two and three years, and which does not require entrance requirements either. At this level, the minimum initial qualification must be achieved. Progression routes: to vocational education. Level 3: carrying out tasks, fully independently. This relates to a vocational programme which lasts between two and four years, and which according to law may be started by those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education. Progression routes: to middle management training and specialist training. Level 4: carrying out tasks of a broad or specialist nature, fully independently Broad professional deployment requires middle management training, which lasts between three and four years. According to law this type of training is open to those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education, or a vocational certificate. Progression routes: to higher education. Specialisation requires a specialist-training programme, which lasts between one and two years and which can be started by those who have of a vocational training certificate. Progression routes: sometimes to higher education (in certain sectors this level is the highest level that can be achieved).
  • The four levels of qualification in vocational education and related courses Level 1: carrying out simple practical tasks. This objective relates to the training of assistants, it lasts between six months and one year, and does not require entrance qualifications. This training programme fulfils the labour market requirement for certificate holders at level one, and offers participants who are unable to obtain an initial qualification the opportunity of joining the labour market as a qualified employee. Progression routes: to basic vocational education. Level 2: carrying out practical tasks. This is the basic vocational qualification route that lasts between two and three years, and which does not require entrance requirements either. At this level, the minimum initial qualification must be achieved. Progression routes: to vocational education. Level 3: carrying out tasks, fully independently. This relates to a vocational programme which lasts between two and four years, and which according to law may be started by those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education. Progression routes: to middle management training and specialist training. Level 4: carrying out tasks of a broad or specialist nature, fully independently Broad professional deployment requires middle management training, which lasts between three and four years. According to law this type of training is open to those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education, or a vocational certificate. Progression routes: to higher education. Specialisation requires a specialist-training programme, which lasts between one and two years and which can be started by those who have of a vocational training certificate. Progression routes: sometimes to higher education (in certain sectors this level is the highest level that can be achieved).
  • The four levels of qualification in vocational education and related courses Level 1: carrying out simple practical tasks. This objective relates to the training of assistants, it lasts between six months and one year, and does not require entrance qualifications. This training programme fulfils the labour market requirement for certificate holders at level one, and offers participants who are unable to obtain an initial qualification the opportunity of joining the labour market as a qualified employee. Progression routes: to basic vocational education. Level 2: carrying out practical tasks. This is the basic vocational qualification route that lasts between two and three years, and which does not require entrance requirements either. At this level, the minimum initial qualification must be achieved. Progression routes: to vocational education. Level 3: carrying out tasks, fully independently. This relates to a vocational programme which lasts between two and four years, and which according to law may be started by those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education. Progression routes: to middle management training and specialist training. Level 4: carrying out tasks of a broad or specialist nature, fully independently Broad professional deployment requires middle management training, which lasts between three and four years. According to law this type of training is open to those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education, or a vocational certificate. Progression routes: to higher education. Specialisation requires a specialist-training programme, which lasts between one and two years and which can be started by those who have of a vocational training certificate. Progression routes: sometimes to higher education (in certain sectors this level is the highest level that can be achieved).
  • The four levels of qualification in vocational education and related courses Level 1: carrying out simple practical tasks. This objective relates to the training of assistants, it lasts between six months and one year, and does not require entrance qualifications. This training programme fulfils the labour market requirement for certificate holders at level one, and offers participants who are unable to obtain an initial qualification the opportunity of joining the labour market as a qualified employee. Progression routes: to basic vocational education. Level 2: carrying out practical tasks. This is the basic vocational qualification route that lasts between two and three years, and which does not require entrance requirements either. At this level, the minimum initial qualification must be achieved. Progression routes: to vocational education. Level 3: carrying out tasks, fully independently. This relates to a vocational programme which lasts between two and four years, and which according to law may be started by those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education. Progression routes: to middle management training and specialist training. Level 4: carrying out tasks of a broad or specialist nature, fully independently Broad professional deployment requires middle management training, which lasts between three and four years. According to law this type of training is open to those who have a certificate of pre-vocational education, or a transition certificate to class 4 of senior general secondary education, or a vocational certificate. Progression routes: to higher education. Specialisation requires a specialist-training programme, which lasts between one and two years and which can be started by those who have of a vocational training certificate. Progression routes: sometimes to higher education (in certain sectors this level is the highest level that can be achieved).
  • The Adult & Vocational Education Act (the WEB) provides the 46 regional vocational education & training centres (roc's) with the statutory duty to offer vocational education in three sectors: Engineering and Technology, Economics and Health & Social Care, and to offer adult education. In addition they carry out contract activities i.e. work for third parties which are not part of their statutory duties, and which are not financed by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences (OC&W). The 18 agricultural vocational education & training centres (aoc's) and the three innovation and practical centres (ipc's) provide primary and secondary agricultural vocational education, in the sectors agriculture, natural environment and food technology. These institutions are also subject to the Adult & Vocational Education Act. They are financed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Environment and Fisheries. The 13 specialised colleges provide vocational courses for specific sectors. They are financed by the Ministry of OC&W, if they can demonstrate that their programmes cannot be efficiently provided within an roc. Examples of sectors with specialised colleges are the graphics industry, butchers, painting and decorating, train drivers, the fishing sector, shipping and transport, joinery and fine mechanical engineering. Private teaching institutions are commercial institutions, which provide courses in vocational education and training. They too must comply with the requirements laid down in the WEB Act; they have the same rights as other institutions, but are not funded by the government.
  • For years, the male-female ratio in vocational education and training has shown an imbalance in the sectors engineering & technology and health and social care. This imbalance is slowly improved upon. Five years previously, participation by men in health and social care was 10 percent, and participation by women in engineering & technology was also 10 percent. (Source: Ministry of OC&W (Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences) key figures2007)
  • In the Netherlands, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences (OC&W) spends more than 30 billion Dutch guilders a year, on education. This represents 17% of all gross government expenditure, and 5.1% of the Gross Domestic Product. At 5.1% of GDP the Netherlands is below the OECD average of 6 percent. More than 4 billion guilders from the OC&W budget are spent on the VET sector (vocational education and training and adult education). For each participant in vocational education, every VET institution receives 8,300 guilders for education and 900 guilders for accommodation. For adult education, OC&W provides 34 guilders per adult resident to the municipalities, in addition to 6,900 guilders per immigrant eligible for naturalisation into Dutch society, via an educational programme. (Figures for 1997; excluding agricultural education; source: OC&W key figures 1999)
  • In the Netherlands, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences (OC&W) spends more than 30 billion Dutch guilders a year, on education. This represents 5.6% of the Gross Domestic Product. At 5.1% of GDP the Netherlands is below the OECD average of 6 percent.

Transcript

  • 1. ContentsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch Educational SystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van Twente
  • 2. Where on earth????
  • 3. EuropeWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van TwentePrevention: EarlySchool Leaving
  • 4. The NetherlandsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystem AmsterdamThe VET SystemRegion Twente Almelo The HagueROC van Twente HengeloPrevention: EarlySchool Leaving Enschede Rotterdam
  • 5. ContentsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch Educational SystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van Twente
  • 6. Thinking of Holland…
  • 7. Thinking of Holland (part one)Where on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van TwentePrevention: EarlySchool Leaving
  • 8. Thinking of Holland (part one)Where on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van TwentePrevention: EarlySchool Leaving
  • 9. Thinking of Holland (part one)Where on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van TwentePrevention: EarlySchool Leaving
  • 10. Thinking of Holland (part one)Where on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van TwentePrevention: EarlySchool Leaving
  • 11. Thinking of Holland (part two)Where on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van TwentePrevention: EarlySchool Leaving
  • 12. The Real Holland
  • 13. ContentsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch EducationalSystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van Twente
  • 14. Dutch Educational System
  • 15. Vocational Education & Training and Adult Education(abbreviated to VET).(BVE in Dutch)
  • 16. ContentsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch Educational SystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van Twente
  • 17. Qualificationstructure: Levels of qualification Level 1: assistant training
  • 18. Levels of qualificationLevel 2: basic vocational training Level 1: assistant training
  • 19. Levels of qualificationLevel 3: full proffessional trainingLevel 2: basic vocational training Level 1: assistant training
  • 20. Levels of qualificationLevel 4: middle-management and specialist training Level 3: full proffessional training Level 2: basic vocational training Level 1: assistant training
  • 21. The VET Sector in the Netherlands 46 regional vocational education & training centres (rocs) 13 agricultural vocational education and training centres (aocs) 13 sector specific colleges 8 private institutions
  • 22. Facts and figures 2009 - 2010 http://www.mboraad.nl/?category/4281/Fei
  • 23. Participation in VETTotal: VET and Adult Education 588.900VET Full Time Students : 351.500 Parttime Students : 172.000 Other : 13.500Adult education Adult Education: 51.900 9% 2% 29% 60% (Source: The Ministry of Oc&W (Education, Culture and Welfare) key figures 2009 2010 Fulltime Parttime other Adult Edu
  • 24. Participation in VET levels 5% 25% 43% 27% level 1 level 2 level 3 level 4
  • 25. Male-Female participationEngineering & 88% 12%technology MaleHealth and 13% 87%Social Care FemaleEconomics 50% 50%
  • 26. Educational output Level 1 = 58 % Level 2 = 56 % Level 3 = 66 % Level 4 = 72%
  • 27. FinanceEducation in the Netherlands 5,6 of Gross Domestic Product
  • 28. ContentsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch Educational SystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van Twente
  • 29. Region Twente
  • 30. Region Twente 600.000 inhabitants (approximately) 4 major cities Increased unemployment Decreasing industrial activities Increasing tourism and leisure Increasing service industries and non-profit services From rural to urban society
  • 31. ContentsWhere on Earth??Thinking of HollandDutch Educational SystemThe VET SystemRegion TwenteROC van Twente
  • 32. ROC van TwenteStudent centeredFuture oriëntedCommunity Focused
  • 33. ROC van TwenteOver 1 800 faculty and staffcirca 25 000 VET-studentscirca 12 496 participants Adult Education0n 11 locations inthree major cities in Twente andon several smaller sites in Twente
  • 34. facilities and funds operational support services personnel students policy, planning & strategy concern controlorganization chart adult education 3 collegs executive board colleges healthcare and welfare 4 colleges co-determination councel Economics 4 colleges Technology 3 colleges
  • 35. Dutch Educational SystemActual developments: ROC level: 3 main programmes1 Competence-Based Learning: new qualifications 20102 Major – Minor Structure : trainingstructure : major 80% professional training minor 20 %additional (free)3 Carreer Guidance (LLL)
  • 36. ROC van Twente Building newcampusses
  • 37. Campus Almelo
  • 38. Frontside Almelo
  • 39. Campus Hengelo
  • 40. Campus Hengelo
  • 41. Central Hall
  • 42. Campus Enschede
  • 43. Campus Enschede
  • 44. The young Dutchmen