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MESMAC and Newcastle City Council HIV & Sexual Health Service:  Assessing the needs of HIV-positive people living in Newca...
About the research <ul><li>Background : There are approximately 260-300 people living with HIV in the Newcastle area. </li...
What is life like for people with HIV? <ul><li>• A recurring theme in people’s comments was that many felt that there is s...
Accessing services <ul><li>Support services from voluntary organisations were often highly valued because they helped addr...
Next Steps <ul><li>1. Tackling stigma and HIV: </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness raising / promotional campaign in public places...
Next Steps <ul><li>3. Supporting people to access services: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a “buddy system” for people who are ...
Conclusions <ul><li>We also asked about:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>levels of formal and informal support received (for exampl...
Further details <ul><li>Contact for queries about the  research and analysis : </li></ul><ul><li>Louise Reeve, Principal P...
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FYC8 HIV Needs 08

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My presentation on what people living with HIV in Newcastle told us about

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Transcript of "FYC8 HIV Needs 08"

  1. 1. MESMAC and Newcastle City Council HIV & Sexual Health Service: Assessing the needs of HIV-positive people living in Newcastle November 2008 Louise Reeve
  2. 2. About the research <ul><li>Background : There are approximately 260-300 people living with HIV in the Newcastle area. </li></ul><ul><li>People with HIV who use health and social care services or are supported by a voluntary sector organisation were given letters inviting them to participate. They were offered a £10 Eldon Square voucher or a £10 donation to an organisation such as Blue Sky Trust as an incentive. </li></ul><ul><li>33 people took part during August 2008 – January 2009. They were interviewed by a worker at MESMAC NE. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>19 were male (58%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly all were aged 30-59 (29 people). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>19 were White British (58%) and 12 were Black African (36%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>18 were heterosexual (males and females), 12 were gay men, and one was bisexual. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>12 came from the “Inner West” area (36%) and eight from the “Outer East” area (24%). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>58% had another health condition, such as mental health difficulties. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. What is life like for people with HIV? <ul><li>• A recurring theme in people’s comments was that many felt that there is still a stigma attached to being HIV-positive: </li></ul><ul><li>“ There is still a stigma attached to having HIV.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ HIV gets a negative response from people without it.” </li></ul><ul><li>Related to this, some people were concerned about their confidentiality when accessing support services. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, when asked about whether services for people with HIV should be integrated with those for other chronic illnesses, the majority (22 people out of 33) said that they should not be. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Half the participants (16 out of 33) commented either that they had concerns about their confidentiality when using services, or that they felt that there was still a stigma attached to having HIV. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One person who thought that services should be integrated said that this was because it would make it more difficult to identify which service users were HIV-positive: “ Yes - less chance of being exposed as HIV-positive ”. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Accessing services <ul><li>Support services from voluntary organisations were often highly valued because they helped address loneliness / social isolation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ BPNE saved my life. Don't feel like I'm the only one.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Peace of mind. Ability to talk to other HIV-positive people.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Some people felt that certain groups provided services only to certain types of service users. </li></ul><ul><li>Others were uncomfortable about going to support organisations or joining groups where they would be the only “new person”. </li></ul><ul><li>Some people had encountered barriers to accessing services, such as transport difficulties, clashes with their working hours, or difficulty accessing the services of an interpreter. </li></ul><ul><li>Others asked for services that are already available, indicating that there is an issue around communicating what is available to people using support services. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Next Steps <ul><li>1. Tackling stigma and HIV: </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness raising / promotional campaign in public places, supported by all relevant organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>More education for GPs around issues relating to HIV and treating HIV-positive people. </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing education for young people, youth workers, health care workers, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Confidentiality </li></ul><ul><li>Aim to address people’s fears around confidentiality by having organisations promote their procedures regarding confidentiality to people who use or might use their services. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Next Steps <ul><li>3. Supporting people to access services: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a “buddy system” for people who are interested in joining a support group, and / or have open days. </li></ul><ul><li>Carry out further research into reasons why people cannot physically access services (such as clashes with working hours or transport difficulties). </li></ul><ul><li>Consider joint work by BPNE and Blue Sky Trust (perhaps in the form of social events) to enable service users to find out what services are available from both organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Communicating about existing services </li></ul><ul><li>Review information on services currently being given to people with HIV– possibly produce a directory of services. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Conclusions <ul><li>We also asked about: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>levels of formal and informal support received (for example, from friends and family), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>whether people have adult or child dependents, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>whether people felt they needed more support. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overall, the research shows that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Many people feel that there is still a stigma attached to having HIV, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loneliness / social isolation is a major issue facing this group of people, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support services such as health care and voluntary organisations are, generally speaking, greatly appreciated by people who use them, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>However, some people may require extra support and information to enable them to make use of these services. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Newcastle City Council, MESMAC and other organisations providing services to HIV-positive people are currently reviewing the findings and considering the next steps. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Further details <ul><li>Contact for queries about the research and analysis : </li></ul><ul><li>Louise Reeve, Principal Policy and Research Officer, </li></ul><ul><li>Research & Information Unit, Newcastle City Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Tel: 0191 277 7508 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>MESMAC NE : </li></ul><ul><li>Jeannie Fraser, Manager, MESMAC North East. </li></ul><ul><li>Tel: 0191 233 1333. </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Newcastle City Council HIV and Sexual Health Services team: </li></ul><ul><li>Telephone: 0191 233 0658 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></ul>
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