Workshop Trade-off Analysis - CGIAR_21 Feb 2013_Group discussion_2.Tradeoffs and impact

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Workshop Trade-off Analysis - CGIAR_21 Feb 2013_Group discussion_2.Tradeoffs and impact

  1. 1. Researchers role and tools in the innovation processThe question: Can we, at different scales, show that knowledge of trade-offsmake a differenceThe case: In a complex resource scarce world single issue objective/policiesare of inferior and perhaps damaging.In a political sense, the opposing parties lobby the policy maker or publicopinion – informed involvement in presenting trade-offs is necessary.Informing the debate- detrimental trade-offs are often perceived as worsethan the actual trade-offs (e.g. conflicts between farmers and foresters)Decisions made are often non-rational, therefore we should identify wherescience plays a role (e.g flooding in Bangkok Vs dry season irrigation)But can we demonstrate that considering trade-offs at higher scales havehelped (questions over whether the impact that the analyses of the MillenniumEcosystem Assessment Development Goals made…communication?)
  2. 2. Researchers role and tools in the innovation processOur role:•Credibility, relevance and legitimacy-these 3 buttons need to be pressed atthe same time. Mix the emphasis depending on your audience but include the3 aspects.•Rigorous and pre-emptive science must be on-going and provide moreexamples of trade-offs and inform the debates with evidence based work.•Pre-emptive – knowledge about slowly variables is long term.•Recognise where in the “issue cycle” that science plays a role•Dedicated communication teams – we cant be all things to everyone- mix ofthe science message and the public apsects
  3. 3. Regulate and/or rewardΣ people * influence * concern Who will monitor Who’ll have to pay? compliance? Litigation Political prominence What will it cost? Implement & monitor What can be done to stop, mitigate, undo or adapt? Evaluate, re- assess How much and where? Who’s to blame? Is it a Cause-effect problem? mechanisms Scoping Stakeholder Negotiation Implemen- Re-eva- analysis response tation luation Stage of the issue cycle Tomich et al. 2004

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