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Workshop Trade-off Analysis - CGIAR_20 Feb 2013_Group Discussion_What's new
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Workshop Trade-off Analysis - CGIAR_20 Feb 2013_Group Discussion_What's new

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  • John Corvett – mobile phones georeference where people are
  • http://www.economist.com/node/13944900
  • Transcript

    • 1. What’s new?Birthe, Javier, Bernard, Siwa, Phil, Maarten, Petr, Fergus
    • 2. Systems thinking resurgent across CG or still a niche concept? – Systems CRPs that take systems work to sensible end points – Getting beyond description – Getting beyond the farm, to livelihoods, landscapes (ecosystem services) and value chains – Maybe restricted within commodity centres (take straw into account as well as grain) – Change the way researchers behave
    • 3. What does systems thinking add to participatory approaches?• Farming systems got stuck in method development (lots of characterisation but not much ‘action’ – although some examplars e.g. CIMMYT East Africa Economics Programme – Adaptive Research Planning in Zambia – Tiwari et al., increased maize yields in Nepal• Overtaken by participatory ‘action’ research and innovation systems that concentrate more on the participation than the systems thinking• Is a systems resurgence required in the CG with new focus, tools and remit?
    • 4. What’s new?• Research in (rather than for) development – Taking innovations to scale (space and time – livelihood systems are dynamic in a development trajectory – Hans Binsanger) – Embracing broader range of ecosystem services (scales; trade-offs) – Getting beyond silver bullets - what works where and for whom – Embracing fine scale variation in drivers of adoption (of technologies and approaches) at nested set of scales: • Soil • Climate • Farming practice • Livelihood systems • Social capital • Markets • Policy
    • 5. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: Greater soil biological activity (earthworms) near trees but effect – soil (biota) greater for some tree species than others – climate (altitude) Pruned trees Free growing trees – farming practices Earthworm cast weight Sample with no earthworm casts – household characteristics 1.2 Cross-semivariogram 1.0 – market opportunities Semivariance 0.8 0.6 0.4 – social capital 0.2 0.0 0 5 10 15 Separation distance (m) Pauli et al 2010 Pedobiologia – policy and its implementation
    • 6. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: – soil (biota) – climate (altitude) – farming practices – household characteristics – market opportunities – social capital – policy and its implementation
    • 7. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: – soil (biota) – climate (altitude) – farming practices – household characteristics – market opportunities – social capital – policy and its implementation
    • 8. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: – soil (biota) – climate (altitude) – farming practices – household characteristics – market opportunities – social capital – policy and its implementation
    • 9. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: – soil (biota) – climate (altitude) – farming practices – household characteristics – market opportunities – social capital – policy and its implementation
    • 10. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: – soil (biota) – climate (altitude) – farming practices – household characteristics – market opportunities – social capital – policy and its implementation
    • 11. The challenge• Fine grained variation in: – soil (biota) – climate (altitude) – farming practices – household characteristics – market opportunities – social capital – policy and its implementation
    • 12. Addressing the challenge– Understand variation of drivers of adoption (new tools and data available)– Try out sufficient range of options across a sufficient range of variation in drivers (modelling required to set up rigorous systematic and experimental testing),– Measure performance objectively and through farmer feedback / adaptation,– Model, generalise and interpret results across scaling domains– Embrace and address uncertainty – refine ability to predict suitability of innovations in co-learning paradigm – progressively reduce risk of innovation– Tools to connect research, extension and farmers as one system – e.g. underpin innovation platforms (but with powerful tools that bring evidence to bear on decisions) - need practical tools (and capacity strengthening) to match options to sites and circumstances– Emerging tools: • Mobile phones (georeference where people are) John Corvett • Net mapping – of power within value chains • Agent based modelling and role playing games
    • 13. Capacity strengthening• Within CG and partners• Not enough to have methods that work but need them to be in widespread use• CG not resourced to do this – still a research organisation• Implications of research in development is a different resourcing model and different sets of skills and partnerships• Skill sets required (which within CG which with partners?): – Data managers – Social facilitation (sociable, social scientists) - connectors – Political ecology - interdisciplinary• Need to be part of the innovation process to learn about it and influence
    • 14. What systems CRPs need• Sample (work across) variability rather than select few sites from which IPGs are generalised• Collate new charaterisation data for broad ‘target areas’– pinpoint gaps – and then fill them• Partnership (co-learning) with upstream centres of expertise rather than simply subcontracting
    • 15. Blue sky• Ten percent• Seek specific blue sky funding (Leverhulme, Australia)• Hear more about failures• Learn across CRPs – periodic meetings to share experience
    • 16. • Extension method – message, audience, context,

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