Friends of northern nevada adult mental health services cemetery

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The powerpoint is a brief history of the Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services Cemetery which will be dedicated as a historic cemetery on January 21, 2011, in Sparks, Nevada, at 2:00. The …

The powerpoint is a brief history of the Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services Cemetery which will be dedicated as a historic cemetery on January 21, 2011, in Sparks, Nevada, at 2:00. The public is encouraged to attend.

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  • 1. “Moving Forward with Dignity by Honoring the Past” Friends of Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services Cemetery 1
  • 2. What is the purpose of Friends of Northern Nevada Mental Health Services Cemetery Group? About UsWe are a group of families of cemetery residents and friends dedicated to the preservation, restoration and memorialization of the historic hospital cemetery located at the corner of 21st and North, in Sparks, Nevada.Friends of Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services Cemetery is a Nevada non-profit corporation and a national, state and local member of NAMI.  2
  • 3. History Helps to Shape Our Future The purpose of the presentation is to show some history of this institution and how it has effected the cemetery over the last 129 years. 3
  • 4. Many Changes in 129 Years for the Hospital The name has changed multiple times. The building has changed. The address has changed. The boundaries have changed. Recordkeeping has changed. Policies have changed. Public awareness of mental illness has changed. Qualifications for administrators have changed. The greatest change that has affected the institution in regard to upkeep of the facility, patient care, and the cemetery over the years has been funding for the hospital. 4
  • 5. The Asylum is almost done in 1881. “A big iron sign, weighing 500 pounds, occupies the front facade. It will be painted black, with letters and the border gilded. It bears the letters ‘Nevada State Asylum’ in an arch, with 1881 beneath. It was cast at the Reno Foundry by A. Fraser, as were all the furnaces and cast work.” “A Big Building”; “What it Takes to Make the Nevada Insane Asylum” REG 12-10- 1881
  • 6. The Nevada State Insane Asylum was founded in 1882. "Founded in 1882, Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services occupies part of 92 acres deeded to the State in the 1800's for the benefit of the mentally ill and developmentally disabled. Located adjacent to the Truckee River in Sparks Nevada, it shares sculpted grounds with Lake's Crossing Center, the State Forensic Hospital, and Sierra Regional Center, the treatment center for the developmentally disabled." From the Mental Health Institute website,http://mhds.state.nv.us/nn/ 6
  • 7. The Nevada Insane Asylum was an architectural showcase. Nevada was very proud of their new hospital. The main building was 232 x 46 feet, wing 100 x 46 feet. It had four floors and two wards on each floor. Special Collections, University of Nevada-Reno Library 7
  • 8. The Asylum was originally in an area that would provide space for a profitable working farm business. This would help with the funding for the hospital. Special Collections, University of Nevada-Reno Library 8
  • 9. Nevada State Asylum The building opened sometime in the first half of 1882, housing 148 inmates transferred from the Pacific Asylum in Stockton, California. These "inmates" were Nevada citizens. They were cared for in Stockton with an agreement from the State of Nevada. Then new plans were made to build this beautiful building and move the patients back to Nevada. They felt the Nevada climate would be healthier for the patients, where the weather wasn’t so rainy and gloomy, and it would be cheaper to care for the patients in Nevada. Courtesy of the Nevada State Historical Society 9
  • 10. Move-in Day at the New Nevada Insane Asylum, July 1,1882 July 1, 1882 was the day the first 148 patients would arrive to begin their life at the new Nevada Insane Asylum. A special train arrived from Stockton. The Journal said “About half the town will be down to the asylum this morning to see the crazy folks come in. A good many will see the sun rise who are not usually guilty of such foolishness.”   Information compiled by Sue Silver and Carolyn Mirich 10
  • 11. The public is encouraged to inspect the Asylum. “Visitors are allowed full and free access, at any and all times, and everyone can judge for themselves.” (NSJ 3-11-1884) 11
  • 12. First Burial at the New Asylum(location of his remains are unknown) Wm. R. Place Daily Nevada State Journal, 9/27/1882 First Death in the Asylum. Wm. R. Place, a native of Whitefield, Lincoln County, Maine, aged 42 years died in the Insane Asylum here day before yesterday, of Brights Disease. (sic) He was sent from Wellington Station, Esmeralda County and is the first death in the New Asylum. He was buried yesterday morning at 11 o’clock in the Asylum cemetery, his brother having arrived to attend the enterment (sic). Information compiled by Sue Silver and Carolyn Mirich 12
  • 13. In 1884 the patients looked forward to Saturdays to attend the ballroom dances, reported Mrs. Alf Doten of her visit. Mrs. Alf Doten made a trip to the Asylum, toured the wards, ate dinner with the patients, and later was persuaded to stay for “the ball” and was so glad she did. She found that her dance partners, the patients, to be quite good dancers and very mannerly. “. . . to the casual observer, looking little different from ordinary dancers, the greatest difference being the manner of dress.” Mrs. Alf Doten observes. She also reported on the state of various well-known patients from around the area and some other patients that were known for notorious reasons in Nevada. “I most certainly agree with all who have honestly inspected the Nevada State Insane Asylum is very well conducted indeed, and a model institution of its kind.” reports Mrs. Alf Doten. From the Nevada State Journal, 3-11-1884; Mrs. Alf Doten Impressions-”Queer” Cases,- “After the Ball”-The Venerable Zabriskle –A Perfect Institution [Austin Reveille , March 7] 13
  • 14. State Insane Asylum in Reno, Nevada in 1889 is a first class building 3 boilers 6 dining rooms 2 food elevators 1 recreation room 1st class plumbing 19 bathtubs 60 washbowls Every room has a foul air outlet and a fresh air outlet. Special Collections, University of Nevada-Reno Library photo number UNRS-P436-91; Photo taken by J. H. Crockwell. REG 12-10-1881, "A Big Building" 14
  • 15. The Asylum also was a working farm with lush vegetation during the spring and summer. Special Collections, University of Nevada-Reno Library 15
  • 16. Panoramic Views of Nevada Mental Hospital ca. 1890 Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine 16
  • 17. Farming at the Asylum from 1882-1945 October 16, 1882: Superintendent Dawson of the asylum is clearing up the land and preparing it for seed in the spring.  He will make the State's farm a very valuable piece of property in a few months. Article from REG October 16, 1883, p. 3 Transcribed by Arline Laferry, docent, Nevada Historical Society Photo from Special Collections University of Nevada-Reno Library (photo has been cropped) 17
  • 18. Governor Adams voted to remove Dr. Dawson as Superintendent of the Insane Asylum. DNSJ 1883 April 4 Wednesday page 2 “Removal of Dr. Dawson” Removal of Dr. Dawson. He refused to resign. REG 1883 April 11 page 2 “. . . Governor Adams voted to remove Dr. Dawson from the Insane Asylum to provide a place for Dr. Bergstein as a reward for valuable political services rendered in Storey County at the Democratic primaries. Articles were transcribed by Arline Laferry, Docent, Nevada Historical Society, May 2009 18
  • 19. The Asylum a Working Farm Many farm products were produced on the Asylum Farm. Patients or inmates, as they were once called, and who were able worked on the farm. 19
  • 20. Some of the crops and farm products that were raised on the farm were: From articles transcribed by Arline Laferry, docent, Nevada Historical Society; articles from 1882-1917 20
  • 21. The water tower held 3,000 gallons of water at Nevada Hospital for Mental Diseases in the 1890’s. Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine 21
  • 22. The well causes patients to become ill. 1891, the planking in the well had so decayed, that patients drinking the water were suffering an outbreak of illness. NSJ 1-25-1953; “Nevada Mental Hospital has Reached Success After Many Years of Difficulty, Shortages, and Hardship” by Frank Johnson 22
  • 23. The hospital is renamed. (Dr. Henry) “Bergstein received an appointment to superintendent, a position he held from 1895 to 1898, during which time he changed its name to the Nevada Hospital for Mental Diseases.” http://www.onlinenevada.org/henry_bergstein,_father_of_nevada_professional_medicine 23
  • 24. Nevada Hospital for Mental Diseases, ca. 1890 Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine 24
  • 25. Dr. Bergstein changes some policies. “He immediately stopped the practice of allowing weekend curiosity seekers to gawk at the patients. Bergstein also recommended legislation that would discourage sending to the hospital paupers who were not mentally ill.” http://www.onlinenevada.org/henry_bergstein,_father_of_nevada_professional_medicine 25
  • 26. Nevada Hospital of Mental Diseases, ca. 1890. Dr. H. Bergstein with son and staff, Ed White and Mrs. Duffy. Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine 26
  • 27. Superintendents report wages too low for attendants and not enough money available to hire an adequate amount of attendants to care for the patients. 1891 Dr. G. H. Thomas found that salaries were so low that it was impossible to keep efficient attendants. Dr. Bergstein reported that he had only 8 attendants to serve the needs of 190 to 200 inmates and he had started with 12. 1907, Dr. Gibson, reported that attendants work 6 days a week and had to stay on the grounds, worked 12 hours a day. He requested they have a raise to $55/month. NSJ 1-25-1953 27
  • 28. Nevada Hospital for Mental Disease, House Staff, ca. 1890 Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine 28
  • 29. Funding Inadequate for Maintaining Building Economies forced on the institution by legislative appropriations left administrators little choice but to care for patients and hope to skim off enough extra for needed repairs and additions. In 1891 an investigative report to Governor R. K. Colrod, showed toilets were broken, sewers in disrepair, and waterlines had caused damage to walls. NSJ 1-25-1953 29
  • 30. Patients came from many walks of life and they had helped to build Nevada. V & T employees Former mayor Tailor Fireman Cattlemen Stage coach driver Dressmaker Miners Druggist Harness maker Sheepherder Rancher Butcher Tinsmith Veterans Carpenter Southern Pacific Railroad employee Singer (Louisa Piper of Piper’s Opera House in Virginia City) Teacher 30
  • 31. There were various reasons for patients to be committed. Loss of business Loss of children Indigestion Disappointment in love Mining speculation Hereditary Jealously Uterine Disease Domestic trouble 31
  • 32. Other reasons for commitment Working in bad air Epilepsy Syphilis Lead poisoning Filthy habits Religion Loss of money Intemperance Overheating 32
  • 33. More reasons for commitment Ardent spirits Fever Solitary life Overwork Disappointment Death of husband Weak minded Brain trouble Want of food 33
  • 34. Other reasons recorded for commitment. Old age Poverty Trouble Dementia or Alzheimer’s disease Chronic mania Melancholia Transferred from the State Penitentiary Unable to get along with Last years or days of life either ill or aging 34
  • 35. Leaving the Hospital Not all of the patients were able to be released after they were treated. Many patients stayed until they died, as they were unable to be released, or they were placed in the hospital to spend their last days. Many patients that died while patients were buried in the hospital cemetery. 35
  • 36. 16 Superintendents from 1882-1953 “Superintendents were medical men, and were not trained in the treatment of the mentally ill. It has only been in the most recent years that competent psychiatric training has been a prerequisite to the post.” NSJ 1-25-1953 36
  • 37. People from many different lives are committed to the hospital. Four people who were buried at the hospital cemetery came to live at the hospital for different reasons, but all four ended up with similar fates. They were lost to history, because of poor recordkeeping over the years, and because of public feelings about mental illness. 37
  • 38. Cora Wilcox Clark Death Record: February 15, 1943 Unknown gravesite 38
  • 39. Cora Wilcox Clark The face of this cemetery might well be represented by Cora Wilcox Clark.  Cora was the daughter of the well-known Wilcox family of Carson City.  Her father, George Wilcox, was a Civil War veteran and a Mayflower passenger descendant.  Cora led the usual life of the times, marrying young and having a family.  Her life changed when her husband had her committed to the State Hospital in 1917.  The reason given to her family was that he could not get along with her. 39
  • 40. Cora Wilcox Clark’s life at the Nevada State Hospital 1917-1943 Cora would spend the next 26 years of her life at the State Hospital during some of the worst times of its history.  Her family always corresponded with her and sent money for her clothing and other needs.  They were never told to stop sending money for her care, but on a visit they were told she had previously "vanished".  A death certificate was obtained a few years later showing that she died at the hospital in 1943 and was buried in the hospital cemetery.  Cora had family in Carson City and her father, mother, and brothers are all buried at Lone Mountain Cemetery.  At the time of her death, the law required that family be notified.  A death notice was to be published in a local paper.  Neither of these things was done for Cora so her children were unable to bury her with her family according to their wishes.  As was the custom at this hospital, and others across the country, she was buried on hospital grounds in the manner fitting an indigent as defined by the State of Nevada. 40
  • 41. The location of Cora Wilcox Clark’s remains are still unknown. On the day of her death in 1943, her troubled life may have given way to a peaceful eternal rest, but the treatment and respect given to her remains was another story. 41
  • 42. Lizzie Woodfolk Lizzie Woodfolk was transferred to the Nevada Insane Asylum from the Nevada State Penitentiary. Death Record: May 11, 1935 Unknown gravesite Photo courtesy of the Nevada State Archives 42
  • 43. Francisco Guido Francisco Guido worked as a gardener while a patient at the Nevada State Asylum. His family had wondered what happened to him until 2010, when they found the Friends of Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services Cemetery website. Death Record: March 16, 1948 Unknown gravesite Photo provided by: The Guido Family 43
  • 44. Stacy Severn Tinkham 44 Death Record: August 21, 1934 Unknown gravesite No Photo Available
  • 45. Stacy Severn Tinkham Stacy Severn Tinkham was born in New York. His father, Adam R. Tinkham, purchased the Thayer Ranch in Spanish Spring Valley, Glendale Precinct in 1882, where the family lived for over twenty years. Stacy's parents, Adam and Helen (nee Cowles) Tinkham, died in 1903 and 1906, and left the bulk of their substantial estate to the State of Nevada, specifically “Nevada State Hospital for Mental Diseases”, for the continuing care, maintenance, burial, and headstone for Stacy, specifying he was to be buried next to his parents at Mountain View Cemetery in Reno. 45
  • 46. Stacy Severn Tinkham (Gravesite Unknown) Stacy died August 21, 1934 and was buried in the Asylum Cemetery in an unknown, unmarked grave. The hospital did not bury Stacy next to his parents or provide a headstone for his grave. What the State did with the Tinkham trust fund is unknown. 46
  • 47. Tinkham Family Monuments at Mountain View Cemetery 47 Close up of Stacy’s Parents’ Headstone Stacy Severn Tinkham Died August 21, 1934 Gravesite Unknown at the Nevada State Hospital for Mental Diseases Cemetery Stacy’s Parents Adam and Helen Tinkham Stacy’s Brother T. K. Tinkham Photos taken by Cheryl Obos
  • 48. The hospital once was a beautiful building with well kept grounds. It sadly fell into disrepair over the years due to inadequate funding. Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine; Nevada Hospital for Mental Diseases, ca. 1890 48
  • 49. 1907 Dr. Gibson reports skimpy appropriations affecting his patients. Because of unsanitary plumbing and sewage systems, Dr. Gibson was forced to acknowledge that the health of his patients was “very poor.” NSJ 1-25-1953 49
  • 50. Coffins donated by Reno Undertakers In 1909 Messrs. Groesback and Alter, undertakers of Reno donated a wagon load of coffins, after their mortuary parlors were damaged by fire. NSJ 1-25-1953 50
  • 51. Cemetery Shown Fenced in 1911 Photo Courtesy of University of Nevada School of Medicine 51
  • 52. Aerial photograph of Nevada Mental Health Institute, 1922. Also visible the adjacent ranch land and the Truckee River. Special Collections, University of Nevada-Reno Library 52
  • 53. 65 years after the institution opened, this photo shows poorly marked gravesites shown in 1945. Some names were written on paper and tacked to plain board. Courtesy of the Nevada State Archives; NSB-0089HiRes 53
  • 54. Close-up view of recent shallow graves shown in 1945 photos. Even then most graves had no markers to identify the site. Courtesy of the Nevada State Archives; NSB-0090HIRes 54
  • 55. Employees handle burials from 1882-1948. Employees were still handling all of the details of the deceased patient’s burials hammering together crude wooden boxes for interment in the institution’s cemetery plots up to the year 1948. (NSJ 1-25-1953) Burials were not allowed during daylight hours when patients are about the grounds. (Information Compiled by Sue Silver and Carolyn Mirich) 55
  • 56. Small makers are visible on many gravesites. This is a general view of the cemetery showing condition of the plots. Photos were taken January 11, 1945. Courtesy of the Nevada State Archives; NSB-0091-HiRes 56
  • 57. Ditch Unearths Burials at the Cemetery In the 1940s there were eyewitness accounts of a huge ditch, approximately 8 feet by 6 feet, being trenched through the center of the cemetery off 21st Street with the knowledge and permission of the State of Nevada. Bodies and coffins were unearthed. Some of these bodies were recent burials. A pipeline of 3-foot concrete pipe was later installed through the cemetery at a depth of 8 feet. Information Complied by Sue Silver and Carolyn Mirich 57
  • 58. Eyewitness Accounts of Cemetery Atrocities “Someone had the bright idea to dig a huge ditch across the cemetery. This was not just a two-or three-foot ditch. This ditch was at least eight feet deep and six feet wide. A huge, lumbering drag-line excavator mounted on tracks came in and started cutting the ditch across the graveyard. . . By mid-day, the excavator started cutting into the graves that dotted the site. Corpses, body parts and pieces of rotted coffins began to litter the spoil pile alongside the trench.” More detailed eyewitness accounts can be read in: Uncovering Archeology by Dennis Cassinelli, read excepts on the following website. http://web.mac.com/denniscassinelli/Dennis_Cassinelli/UncoverExcerpt.html 58
  • 59. The stone cottage was once a home for the superintendent and later used for workers from the male ward. Reno Evening Gazette 1945 Feb 20"Investigators Submit Report on Nevada State HospitalA second cottage (stone) formerly used by a resident physician, is now being remodeled to serve as male attendant's home, which is a commendable and essential project, since these men are now housed on a ward which is supposed to condemn soon.“ [sic] Photo by Arline Laferry, docent, Nevada Historical Society 59
  • 60. Old fashioned kitchen for the hospital each meal cost 22 cents per patient. “Many patients worked in the kitchen, which was in charge of a competent chief cook. It had been modernized since 1945, but was still the subject of criticism at the latest inspection by the State Board of Health.” [sic] Kitchen – NSJ S-2-8-1953 60
  • 61. Licensed hairdressers were available at the hospital once a week. A barber shop was also on the hospital grounds. Hairdresser – NSJ 2-8-1953 61
  • 62. At one time the beds were no more than 1 foot apart. After an inspection in 1945 they were then given a minimum of 4 feet apart. During the day patients are encouraged to engage in minor tasks or else visit the dayrooms in the wards. Patient Beds – NSJ – 2-8-1953 62
  • 63. A marble hydrotherapy tub was installed for $30,000 , in the 1920s. This unit was rarely used, because of a lack of water pressure. Architects and engineers were unable to correct the problem economically. Hydrotherapy Unit – NSJ 2-8-1953 63
  • 64. Sub-surface passage was used for food delivery. It ran under the employee’s quarters. In 1954 the oldest building was the kitchen and the employee’s quarters. The passage below was dark and musty from leaking plumbing. It was still occasionally troubled by rodents. Previously two bathrooms fell through the rotting floor. All patients were removed from the building in November. Tunnel – NSJ 2-8-1954 64
  • 65. Children of the Asylum 14 children were cared for by women patients with strong mothering instincts. The age range was age 4 t0 17. The children were physically deformed and were all hard to take care of, they were classified as “noneducatable.” A doll and a few small toys were the only playthings. Children over 12 were kept in wards with members of their own sex. Article found by Arline Laferry, docent, Nevada Historical Society: Nevada State Journal; Sunday, February 8, 1958; p. 4-5 65
  • 66. This is the new building after the previous building was condemned. 66
  • 67. March 28, 1949, Nevada State Legislature Abolished the Hospital Cemetery March 28, 1949, the Nevada Legislature passed Assembly Bill 357. Section 3524.01 stated “it is hereby made the specific duty of the board of commissioners of the Nevada Hospital for Mental Diseases to abolish the use of any cemeteries now located on the hospital grounds.” This statute meant that this cemetery should no longer be used for burials, but there was no provision made for the care of graves previously placed in the cemetery. Complied by Sue Silver and Carolyn Mirich; 2010 67
  • 68. Fire Station Access Road Cuts through the “Old State Hospital Cemetery” in 1955. "When an access road was being built into the new Sparks fire station near the state hospital in January, it was necessary to cut through the old state hospital cemetery, resulting in a minor ruckus in Sparks.  Hospital Supt. S.J. Tillim said Jan. 20, no records exist to disclose names for the many unmarked graves in the cemetery, which was opened in 1882, but had not been used since 1949.” The last know burial in the cemetery was 6 years before this date.  REG 1/1/1955 68
  • 69. 19 Coffins Reburied Again in 1977 Nineteen coffins accidently unearthed by a road crew were relocated on Thursday to the Nevada Mental Health Institute. The gravesites were unearthed August 31, when a road grader accidently uncovered the coffins. They were reburied within the boundaries of the Institute’s graveyard. The redwood coffin designs dated back to the 1930s. Article from NSJ September 1, 1977 provided by Arline Laferry, docent, Nevada Historical Society 69
  • 70. Pinion Park playground leased to the city of Sparks in 1960s. It is located on previous State Cemetery Land. Over the years the cemetery land was encroached upon by machinery, roads, buildings, parking lots, and playgrounds. The original boundaries were lost over time. Photo provided by Arline Laferry 70
  • 71. Children find bones in play area, 1977. “The spokesman said children playing in the sandy area discovered bones from gravesites and the children’s parents reported the findings to police.” Article NSJ 9-1-1977; Provided by Arline Laferry, docent, Nevada Historical Society 71
  • 72. Cemetery with Pinion Park in the background, 2005. Photo taken by Bob Berrington 72
  • 73. Cemetery land surrounded by a changing urban landscape. The cemetery is unrecognizable. Photo taken by Bob Berrington 73
  • 74. White topped fence posts mark area where existing markers are located in 2005. Photo taken by Bob Berrington 74
  • 75. Cemetery land in 2005, no grave markers are visible in this photo. Photo taken by Bob Berrington 75
  • 76. Photo of Cemetery taken in 2008 Photo taken by Dennis Cassinelli 76
  • 77. The Beginnings of Friends of Northern Nevada Mental Health Services Cemetery April 18, 2008 An inquiry is made about the burial site for Cora Wilcox Clark. The records showed she was buried there, but no one knew where. History of the cemetery is uncovered. A group of concerned family members, citizens, and historical researchers work together in an effort to properly memorialize the historical Nevada cemetery for all that are buried there. 77
  • 78. The cemetery has changed with time and its existence was forgotten by some and unknown by many. Photo by Arline Laferry 78
  • 79. The Nevada State Legislature Takes Action Senator Mathews and Assemblywoman Smith sponsor Senate Bill 256. Senator Coffin supports the bill, along with many others. Saturday, May 16, 2009, the Nevada Senate voted on SB 256 and passed the bill. 79
  • 80. Nevada Has a New Historic Cemetery! Governor Gibbons signed SB 256 on May 22, 2009. 80
  • 81. July 15, 2010, Construction Problems Occur Again July 15, 2010, human bones were discovered during construction on 21st Street, adjacent to the cemetery. Workers placed the bones in a bag and left them by the fence. They were found and reported by a citizen. 81
  • 82. Long awaited plans are taking shape. Fencing, landscaping, relocation of known graves, and monument plans are being put into action. Photo provided by Dennis Cassinelli 82
  • 83. A sign is posted to designate the area as a historic cemetery. Photo by Arline Laferry 83
  • 84. Memorial Day 2009, Honoring All Veterans and Others Who Rest in the Cemetery Photo by Arline Laferry 84
  • 85. A fence is constructed and new boundaries are set for the cemetery. Photo provided by Dennis Cassinelli 85
  • 86. Communities change and a historical cemetery intertwines with our present. Photo provided by Dennis Cassinelli 86
  • 87. A wrought iron fence that will stand the test of time is a perfect choice for a historic cemetery and marks the new boundaries for the cemetery. Photo provided by Dennis Cassinelli 87
  • 88. These metal name plates remained in existence at the cemetery in 2010. Photos courtesy of Dennis Cassinelli 2010 88
  • 89. One of the existing metal name plates found at the cemetery in memory of Otto Ling 1885-1946. Photo taken by archaeologist Kim Hopkinson 2010 89
  • 90. The 11 remaining markers that were found prior to 2010, were determined to be inaccurate in name and location in 2010. Information from the Nevada Tombstone Project website and from a death register record for consensual spelling of names. 90
  • 91. Monument Plans 91 Courtesy of YESCO Permission 12/28/2010
  • 92. “THIS IS SACRED GROUND, NOW PROTECTED, Photo provided by Dennis Cassinelli 92
  • 93. IN HONOR OF ALL OF THOSE WHO SUFFERED AND PASSED ON, Photo provided by Dennis Cassinelli 93
  • 94. AND IN HOPE FOR THOSE NOW LIVING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS, Photos provided by Dennis Cassinelli 94
  • 95. TO BE ACCEPTED IN THEIR COMMUNITIES.” Although 767 names are known, their exact location in the cemetery is not. There are thought to be an additional 400 interments whose names are lost to history. The individuals buried adjacent to this monument are the only ones whose remains are identified with their name. (This wording is taken from the monument and is inaccurate.) Even though there were 11 markers left, the markers were found to be inaccurate in name and location. So, all known gravesites adjacent to the monument are named unidentified, and the monument is worded incorrectly. 95
  • 96. After many years of poor recordkeeping, gravesites that are known to exist are now marked unidentified. Photos provided by Dennis Cassinelli 96
  • 97. First Burial(In Asylum Cemetery) William Riley Place Age 42 Death recorded September 25, 1882 Unknown Gravesite Daily Nevada State Journal, 9/27/1882 97
  • 98. In Memory of *KNOWN VETERAN ABRAHAM, PEDRO ACEBEDO, MARIA ADAM, AUGUST ADAMS,ALBERT ADAMS, C. ADAMS, EDWIN W. AH GON AH GUNG AH KEE AH SING AH TOM AIKENS, MARGARET AITKEN, ELIZABETH ALLEN, B.F. AMMUNSON, JOHN AMOND, WILLIAM AMUSCHATEGEN, JOSE ANDERSON, EPHRAIM ANDERSON, FRED ANDREA, JOSEPH D. ANDRIS, JOSEPH WILLIAM ANDY, MINNIE ANGA, AUGUST ANSON, PERRY APPLETON, CHARLES D. ARCHONDAS, HARRY G. ARETIA, MIKE ARMSBURY, DOC ARNFIELD, LYMAN ARRETELSIS, BERNARDO ARTMAN, FRED ASHTON, HARRY BABB, J.H. BACIGALUPI, GIACOMO BACKUS, FRANK BAGLEY, JOHN BAILEY, JACOB BAILEY, STUART W. BALBACK, JOHN * BALDWIN, OSCAR BANDONI, GUISEPPE BANFIELD, WILLIAM BARCUS, ALBERT M. BARIRUKA, PETER BARNETT, CASSIE BARRETT, JACK BARTELL, JOE BARTHOLOMEW, STEPHEN BARTINE, CLAUDE BASTIAN JOSEPH BAUERS, JOSEPH BEAL, GEORGE BEAZLEY, WILLIAM BENDER, WILLIAM BENNETT, THOMAS L. BERNIE, GUISSEPPA BEST, JEFF BIGRAS, AUGUSTIN BIONDA, ANTONIO BISSETTE, M. BLAIR, HUGH NEWELL BOLAND, WILLIAM BOND, WILLIAM BONE, WILLIAM J. BORDON, ALEXANDER BORGSESE, JOE BOSNOS, CHRIST BOSTON, JOHN L BOULERAND, HENRY BOWMAN, A. BOWMAN, ELIZABETH BOYD, EMMA BRAICCK, FRANK BRAINARD, E.V. BRANNAN, ELIZABETH BRAY, PAUL BRAYCOVICH, STEVE BREWER, MARGARET BRISSON, LOUIS BROCKSON, JARVIS F. BROOKS, CHARLES BROOKS, MYRTLE BROWN, ANNA BROWN, CHARLES (MRS.) 98
  • 99. In Memory of*KNOWN VETERAN BROWN, EDWARD BROWN, JOSEPH W. BROWN, KATHERINE BROWN, M.J.”JENNIE” BROWN, ORIN T. BROWN, ROME BROWN, THOMAS W. BUCKLEY, CATHERINE WELSH BUFFALO, TOM BURKE, JAMES BURKE, JOHN BURKE, TIMOTHY * BURKE, W.H. BURNES, WILLIAM BURNHAM, FRANK BURNS, ALEXANDER BURNS, CAROLINE BUTTERFIELD, W.P. BUZZETTI, FRANCISCO BYRNE, GEORGE BYRNES(S), PETER CALLAHAN, NELLIE CAMPBELL, MOORE CANNERE, MARTIN CARDE, FRANK CARDIFF, DENNIS CAREY, ARCHIBALD CAREY, EDWARD CARL, RICHARD L. CARPENTER, S. CARRIEGA, COSME CARROLL, JERRRY CASEY, BERT CHAMBERS, CHARLES CALVIN CHAPMAN, CHAS CHAPMAN, NELLIE CHRISTOPHER, GEORGE R. CHUNG WE TUEY CLARK, CORA W. CLARK, ETHEL CLARK, JOHN CLARK, MARY F. CLARK, ROBERT JASON CLARK, W.S. CLARKE, ANNIE CLARKE, FRANK T. CLINTON, W. FRANK COBB, LEWIS COBERLY, J. B. COCKING, AGNES COCROFT, SAM COFFEE, JOHN COFFEY, “NELLIE” COHN, ELI COLLINS, AUSTIN GLOVER COLLINS, JACK C. CONNANT, JOSEPH W. CONNERS, MATHEW CONNORS, JOHN CONRADT, HENRY CONTI, TONY CONWAY, EDWARD B. CONWAY, JOHNNIE M. COOK, HENRY COOPER, JOHN * CORDOVA, FRANCIS CORPY, TIMOTHY CORRECCO, MARIA COUCH, GEORGE W. COUCH, MARGARET COURER, PAUL COWLING, CHARLES SPURGEON CRANDELLE, DELLE CROOKED EYES CUMMINS, T. CUNNINGHAM,, MARY 99
  • 100. In Memory of* KNOWN VETERAN CUNNIGTON, THOMAS CURNOW, THOMAS CURTS, WILLIAM CUSICK, FLORENCE DALSTROM, GEORGE DAUGHERTY, JOHN DAWSON, JOHN DEAN, MARTIN DE FRIES, GEORGE W. DEGUILIO, LUIGI DIETZ, GEORGE DEL HAYO, RANALDO DELANEY, ANDREW DEMARCO, BEN DEMENT, GEORGE DEMO, ANGELO DEMPSEY, TIMOTHY DEP MAUG DEPOALI, JOHN DESKOS, GEORGE DEXTER, JOHN DICKSON, CHARLES DIXON, GEORGE DIXON, GEORGE A. DOBRIAN, JOHN DOE, JIMMIE DOE, MARY DOERFLER, JOHN J. DOLAN, HANNAH DONAHUE, EDWARD R. DONDERO, JOSEPH DOOLEY, TIMOTHY DORR, JOSEPH DOYLE, MARY DRAKE, JOSEPH W. DUCHANE, NELLIE DUDLEY, A.A. DUFFY, EDWARD DUFFY, ELIZABETH DUGAN, PATRICK DUMAS, JOSEPH DUNLAP, MARTHA E.G. DUNN, DANIEL DUNNIGAN, HANNAH DUPONT, EDWARD H. DWYER, WILLIAM EARLES, WILLIAM A. EARPS, WILLIAM EBBS, C.R. ELROD, SAM ELROD, W. L. ENGELHARDT, JOHN WM. ENSIGN, HENRY ERB, ROSE WILLIAMS EVANCHIK, VALENTINE EVANS, ELIZA FADDLING, WILLIAM FARIELLA, J.D. (MRS.) FARRELL, JOHN FENNELL, TIMOTHY FENTON, E. R. FENTON, JESSIE FERRERO, ARTHUR FIEBUSH, A. FINK, H.A. FISCHER, CHARLES FITZGERALD, E.L. FLICK, EDWARD R. FLORES, FRANK FLOWERS, LUTHER FLUDDER, WILIAM FLYNN, JOHN FOGARTY, JAMES FOLEY, MATHEW FORTUNA, ROLIO FORULWAY, ADOLPH CONSTANTINE FOTHERGILL, JACK FRANCIS, EMMA 100
  • 101. In Memory of* KNOWN VETERAN FRANCISCO, FRANCISCO FRANEY, JAMES FREEMAN, HARRY M. FRENDS, C. FRISBIE, M.A. (MRS.) FROHOCK, WILLIAM W. FROST, RUEL FRYE, JOHN FULLERTON, JACK FUNK, VELORA GABARDI, PIETRO GAEDARDI, FAUSTO GARBOCCI, ROSO GARCIA, JUAN GARDEURAUX, LOUIS GARIBALDI, G. GATELY, JOHN GATES, JOHN GAXIOLA, FRANK GEBAUER, OTTO GEE, TOM GEORGE, ABRAHAM GEORGE, JOHN GEORGE, JOHN GERMINI, FRANK GHOST, GREGORY GILBERT, GENEVIEVE GILES, ALVIN GILLEN, THOMAS GLAN, BARNEY GLANZMAN, MARY ANN GLASSETT, ELLEN GODDARD, ELI “LEE” GOIK TROY GOLL, FRED GOMEZ, MANUEL GONZALES, MARCARIO GOODWIN, RICHARD C. GORLIN, JOHN B. GORMAN, ANN GOVERS, MANUEL GRANT, SALLY GRAY, JAKE GREENHOOD, ORMAND GREENWOOD, EVA GREER, CHARLES WESLEY GREGORY, ADDIE A. GRENZFELD, WILLIAM GRIFFITH, JOSEPH GUEZARRA, TONY GUIDO, FRANCISCO HADLOCK, THOMAS HAGEN, ROSA HAINES, JOHN HAKALA, SYLVESTER HALLIGAN, WILLIAM’ HALLORAN, PETER HAMLIN, C.C. HANLEY, DAN HANSEN, HOLDER HANSEN, PETER HANSON, HENRY F. HARR, WILLIAM H. HARRINGTON, MARY HARRIS, CATHERINE A. HARRIS, EDWARD HARRISON, CHARLES HART, W.H. HASKELL, FRANK HASPER, HENRY HATCHER, FRANK HAYDEN, ARCHIE HAYES, CHARLES HAYNES, S.L. HEAD, JOHN HEADING, ROBERT HEATHERTY, WILLIAM HECK, JOE HEILSHORN, JOHN H. HEINRICH, HANS HENLEY, EDWARD G. HERRON, JAMES M. HESTER, JOHN “IKE” HEUBECK, PETER 101
  • 102. In Memory of*KNOWN VETERAN HILL, HYRUM HILL, JOHN HILTON, JAMES HINES, WILLIAM HINKELL, JOSEPH W HOFFMAN, ALBERT HOFFMAN, JACOB B. HOLBORN, ALONZO HOLLAND, CHARLES HOLLAND, H. RICHARD HOLTZ, CHARLES HOOPER, GEORGE HOPE, ROBERT * HOPPER, ANNIE HORN, WILLIAM HORSTMAN, JULIUS HOUSE, CASS HUNT, RICHARD HUNTER, MARJORIE HUNTOON, MARY HURLEY, RICHARD HYNDMAN, WILLIAM IMELLI, JOHN INGRAM, ANDREW JACKMAN, HENRY’ JAIS, ENSEBIO JAMES, EDWARD JANES, MATILDA JARVIS, FRED JAYCOX, EDW. JEFFE, LAWRENCE JOERGER, CHARLES R. JOHNNIE, MAGGIE JOHNSON, ALBERT JOHNSON, ALBERT B JOHNSON, EMMA V. JOHNSON, KATE JOHNSON, WILLIAM FRANK JOLIN, WILLIAM JONES, FRANK JONES, JOSEPH JONES, LIBBIE JOSEPH, MANUEL JUANITA, MATTIE JUNGBERG, JOHN ALFRID KAHN, ISABELLE KALAFATICH, PAUL KARNECH, HERMAN KEARNEY, TOM KEATE, OSCAR KEET, LOUIS KELLUM, ELMO FINLEY KELLY, CHARLES H. KELLY, J.C. KELLY, JAMES KELLY, MAE KENNEDY, CHAS I. KENNEDY, CON KENNEDY, P.H. KENWOOD, JOHN KEPOPAS, GUS KEPPLE, JOHN KERR, HUGH W. KETTERING, MARTIN KIELEY, WILLIAM KIELIGER, ALBIN KILET, LIVA KING, GRACE KING, JAMES KING, JOHANNA KINGSMILL, HERBERT GEORGE KINTZ, JAMES KIRK, ROBERT CLIFFORD KISE, WILLIAM KLETZ, FRED KNEESHAW, LESLIE GORDON KNIEKE, PETER H. KNOX, JOHN 102
  • 103. In Memory of* KNOWN VETERAN KODROF, CHARLES KOELLING, HENRY KOENIG, GEORGE KRANICH, HERMAN KUNKLER, FRED LA BATE, WILLIAM LADD, R.E. LAITY, JAMES LAMB, ROBERT LANCASTER, MORRIS LANDON, ROSA LANE, GEORGE LANE, MICHAEL LANE, NETTIE LANNIGAN, JOHN LARSEN, CHARLES LARSON, ANDREW LARSON, LAURA LAWS, WILLIAM LEAVITT, DEBORAH LEBOLDT, MADISON LEDFORD, JOHN E. LEE, CHARLEY LEE, EDWARD SARTANN LEE, PETER LEROY LEE GOON LEE SONG TOY LEEHY, JOHN LEEHY, THOMAS A. LEFEVRE, EUGENE LEONARD, HONORA LEPERE, DICK LEWIS, J.M. LIBBY, WILLIAM LING, OTTO LIPINSKI, AUGUST LIVINGSTON, FRED LOMACH, OSWALD LOPEX, MANUEL LORENTZ, EMIL LORING, JOHN LOVE, CHARLIE LOVE, KATIE LOZANO, PEDRO LUCERO, T. LUDWIG, FRANK LUNDHOLM, CHARLOTTE LYNCH, FRANK LYNCH, MIKE LYNCH, THOMAS LYONS, JOSEPH D. LYTLE, HATTIE MACKEY, ELMER MADUR, MARCELLA MAGLIA, LUIGI MAHONEY, PATRICK MALLON, P. MAIN, CHARLES MANLEY, MAMIE MARLINSON, L.C. MARMASSARI, LORENZO MARQUIS, LILLIE MARTIN, JAMES MARTIN, JOHN JACOB MARTIN, RUTH K. MARTIN, WALTER MASON, AL MASON, PHILLLIP G. MASONIA, FRANCISCO MAXWELL, F.C. MAYER, WILLIAM MAYNARD, H.G. MCALLISTER, JAMES MCCAFFERTY, CHARLES MCCARTNEY, J.D. MCCLELLAND, JAMES MCCONVEY, CHARLES V.J. MCCREERY, A.J. MCCRIMMON, BELLE MCCULLOUCH, HERBERT MCDONALD, JOHNNY G. MCELHOLME, MARY MCFARLAND, CHARLES MCGINLEY, JOHN 103
  • 104. In Memory of* KNOWN VETERAN MCGINNIS, JAMES MCGRAIL, TIM MCINTYRE, BEN MCKILLOP, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, DUNCAN MCLAUGHLIN, JOSEPH MCLAUGHLIN, MARK MCLEOD, JOSEPHINE MCMITCHELL, IRA MCNEILL, JOHN MCQUITTY, WILLIAM MEDINA, ANTONIO MEDLYN, EDWIN MEEKER, LILLIAN, N. MERCURE, F.G. MERCURIO, SALVADOR MERRILL, SARAH MERRILL, WILLIAM E. MEYER, JACOB MICKEY, ESSIE MIDAS, TOM MILLER, JOHN DOE MILLER, NICHOLAS MILLER, THEODORE MILLER, WILLIAM MILLRICK, EDWARD MITCHEL, CHARLES N. MITCHELL, JOHNANNAH MOLIN, OSCAR, A. MONAHAN, JAMES MONDADA, FRANK MONTELIUS, ROSE MOORE, M.J. MOORE, M.B. MOORE, SARAH ANN MORGAN, JACOB MORGAN, PATRICK MORGAN, SUSAN MOYER, WILLIAM MOYNIER, FRED MUFFLEY, WILLIAM H. MUNDAY, JAMES NEEST, JOE NEILSON, MORRIS NELSON, NEIL NELSON, OLE NOLAN, RICHARD NOLAN, THOMAS NOONAN, PETE NORTON, MICHAEL NOVAK, MIKE NUNA, JESUS O’BRIEN, JOHN O’BRIEN, JOHN O’BRIEN, SOPHIA OGLESBY, WILLIAM O’KEEFE, BESSIE OLSON, GEORGE O’NEAL, JOHN O’NEAL, ROBERT O’NEILL, JAMES F. OPPLIGER, EMIL ORSETTI, GIOVANNI OULT, GEORGE OWENS, EDNA OWENS, PATTERSON PABLO, PAUL PALMER, MARGARET PAPAGIE, LOUIS PARKER, LEONARD M. PASTORINA, G. PATTERSON,, SARAH A. PAY, G.W. PEANEY, ROBERT PEDROLI, STEVEN J. PEEK, EDWARD PENN, JOHN WILLIAM PERRY, J.S. PETERS, OHO PETERSON, SWAN PETERSON, WILLIS PHALAN, PATRICIA PHIPPS, EUGENE K. PICKETT, GEORGE W. PIPER, LOUIS PLACE, WILLIAM RILEY PLASTAN, SAMUEL PLATT, JAMES H. POLLARD, JOHN DOE POOLE, WILLIAM 104
  • 105. In Memory of*KNOWN VETERAN PORTUGAL, ELLOUISE MCWILLIAM PRADA, ANICETA PRECIADO, SANCHES (MRS.) PRISTAS, GEORGE QUINN, MORRIS QUINN, WALTER QUONG MOY RAFFENBURG, SAMUEL HOLLINGER RAMENTERIA, JOSE M. RAMOS, E. DONDOSA RANGER, SAMUEL RANGLE, RAMON RASCH, FRANK RASMUSSEN, NELSON RATHCHFORD, C.P. RAYS, REY REAGAN, HERBERT A. REBER, ADAM REILLEY, FRANK REIS, ALEXANDRIA REYNOLDS, ALONZO RIAL, JOSEPH RICE, FELIZ RICHARDS, JAMES RICHARDSON, WILLIAM ROBERTS, VERNA ROBERTSON, N.E. ROBIUS, JOSEPH RODDEY, CORNELIUS RODIN, JAMES M. ROGAN, BRIDGET ROOT, LILA ROVER, ANNIE ROWAN, ANDY A. RUDD, EDWARD RULE, THOMAS RYAN, JOHN RYAN, PATRICK SACALARIS, CHARLES SADLER, WILLIAM SAMBA, SAMBO SANBORN, CHARLES H. SARGENT, MARYANN SARSFIELD, FRED SAYERS, HENRY F. SCHMIDT, JOSEPH SCHUCOROUGH, JOHN SCHWARTZ, ELIZABETH SEVILLE, HARRY SHANEY, FREDERICA SHARP, DICK SHAW, FLOYD W. SHEATS, DAVID SHELLEY, J.M. SHELTON, FREEMAN J. SHERIDAN, JOHN SHERRY, MICHAEL SHERWOOD, WILLIAM SIGMUND, JULIUS SIGUERRITOS, ANTONIO SILVA, TONY E. SIMMONS, CHARLES ROBERT SMITH, ANNIE MINNIE SMITH, CHARLES SMITH, FRANCIS M. SMITH, JAMES SMITH, JOHN W. SMITH, SYLVESTER P. SMITH, WILLIAM SMITH, WILLIAM SMYLES, JOHN C. SNEADE, HIRAM A. SOTO, DOMINGO SPANGLER, JOHN SPECK, GEORGE SPRAGUE, HENRY 105
  • 106. In Memory of* KNOWN VETERAN SPRATT, CHRIS STANLEY, GEORGE STEWART, MAGGIE STEWART, THOMAS STICKLER, H.W. STOLTZ, HENRY STRADA, JOHANA STRAUSSMAN, LEO STRONG, DORA STUART, ISAAC SULLIVAN, JOHN SUMMERS, ANNIE SUTLIFF, GEORGE SWEENEY, JOHN MICHAEL TACCHINO, JOE TALBOT, JAMES TANAGLEA, DOMINICK TAORMINA, G. TAVOAL, MARY TAYLOR, HENRY TAYLOR, JOHN G. TAYLOR, MAE THERIEN, MINERVA THEUERGARTEN, LEOPOLD THOMAS, S.W. THOMAS, TONY THOMPSON, CHRISTIE THOMPSON, JAMES, T. THORINGTON, MARIA L. TINKHAM, STACY SEVERN TOBIN, JAMES TOM, SADIE TONER, THOMAS TONETTI, NATALE TOOMEY, ANDREW H. TOPELL, CHARLES TRACK, JIM TRIGGS, JOHN TRITICOVICH, VICK TUCOVICH, CARL URBAN, JOHN URIGUEN, FRANKIE VAIR, HUGH VALLARGO, G. VANZA, VINCENZO VAUGHN, HARRY VOIGHT, ANTONE VON CAMPEN, AUGUST VON MOLAUSKY, TOUY VUVOVICH, ALICE WAGMAN, MARY B. WAH JIM WAHLE, JACOB WAITE, M. (MRS.) WALKER, MARGARET WALKER, WILLIAM WALLACE, HARRY WALLACE, JOHN WALLING, GEORGE WALLS, MINNIE WALTER, FRANK WAREHAM, FRANCIS WARNER, CHARLES WARNER, P. WARNER, PETE WATSON, JOHN WATSON, MARY WEBER, HENRY WEEKS, JOHN (MRS.) WEISMAN, AXEL WELDON, RICHARD WELLS, JOHN WEMPLE, JAMES WERRICK, GUS WEST, CHARLES W. WESTON, A.M. WHALEN, THOMAS 106
  • 107. In Memory of*KNOWN VETERAN WHEELER, CHARLES AUGUSTUS WHITE, EDWARD L. WHITE, S.A. WHITE, WILLIAM L. WILLARD, CHAS W. WILLARD, J. WILLIAMS, ALMA WILLIAMS, SETH WILLIAMS, SUSAN WILLIS, JOHN WILSON, CHARLIE WILSON, JAMES W. WILSON, J.C. WILSON, JOHN WILSON, SAM (MRS.) WOOD, SARAH WOOD, WILLIAM WOODFOLK, LIZZIE WRIGHT, GEORGE B. WRIGHT, TIMOTHY J. WROBBLE, THEODORE YEE FONG YENG WONG YOUNG, BRIGHAM V. YOUNG, CLEBURNE YOUNG, W. FITZGERALD YRIBAR, ANTONIO ZANOLLETTI, CELESTINE ZANOLLETTI, PETER ZENITZ, GEORGE ZIMMERMAN, J.W. ZIMMERMAN, THOMAS ZUVIZARRETA, ELIAS LAST NAME UNKNOWN, JUDY LAST NAME UNKNOWN, JOSEPH LAST NAME UNKNOWN, NELLIE LAST NAME UNKNOWN, DICK LAST NAME UNKNOWN, MUGGINS AN ADDITIONAL 400 INTERMENTS ARE THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN LOST TO HISTORY 107
  • 108. Last Burial(until 2010 reinterments) Nellie Dixon Age 68 Death recorded January 13, 1949 The monument memorializes Nellie Dixon as Nellie Last Name Unknown. 108
  • 109. Cemetery DedicationJanuary 21, 2011, in Sparks, Nevada The cemetery was dedicated 129 years after the first burial in 1882. 62 years after the last burial in 1949. 109
  • 110. Website for further information www.friendsofnorthernnevadaadultmentalhealthservicescemetery.com 110
  • 111. For all who made this historic cemetery a reality. . . Thank you to all of those caring people who unselfishly volunteered and have given countless hours and years of their time, to assure that this cemetery was properly memorialized for the people who were buried there, for their families, and for the cemetery to be preserved as a part of Nevada’s rich history. Sometimes doing the right thing takes perseverance, a common vision, and the will to overcome many obstacles set in your path. 111
  • 112. Friends of Northern Nevada Mental Health Services Cemetery, a Nevada Nonprofit Corporation Board of Directors: Carolyn Mirich, Board/Family/Research/Missoula, Montana Scott Borchert, Board/Family/Research/Orem, Utah Larry Nicodemus, Board/Family/Research/Pilot Point, Texas Lorraine Hermiston, Board/Family/Research/Plains, Montana Annette DeBusk, Board/Family/Research/Wellington, Nevada Dennis Cassinelli, Board/Research/Cemetery Expertise/Dayton, Nevada David Davis, Board/Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, General William Passmore Carin (Camp 25)/Reno, Nevada 112
  • 113. Thank You to Consultants and Contributors Bob Berrington, Photography. It is with great sadness he passed before seeing the new monument at the cemetery. Sue Silver, Consultant, Cemetery Preservationist, Advocate, and Local Historian Elinor Berger, Family/Research Susan Kirby, Elizabeth Chapter of Daughters of American Pioneers Arline Laferry, Docent, Nevada Historical Society, for her unending support of this cemetery, her research, and photographic contributions Gerry Perry, Manager, Nevada Tombstone Project, for her research efforts, and support of efforts to preserve this cemetery Cassinelli Landscaping and Construction Hayley Mirich, Editing Liz McKinnell, Graphic Design 113
  • 114. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Thank you first and foremost to the taxpayers of the State of Nevada, without whom this historic cemetery would have continued to decay. Dr. Harold Cook, Administrator, Division of Health and Developmental Services, under whose watch this cemetery was restored to a respectful place of rest for approximately 800 people Cody Phinney, Lisa Echan, Tanya Benitez, Rosalyne Reynolds, LaQueta Armstrong, Art Melders, and other staff Governor Jim Gibbons, for signing SB 256 Mayor Geno Martini and the staff at the City of Sparks for recognizing the need to respect those in this cemetery and returning Pinion Park to its proper purpose Ronald M. James, Department of Cultural Affairs, for overseeing and supporting this historic cemetery 114
  • 115. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Senator Bob Coffin, for his early support Senator Bernice Mathews and Assemblywoman Debbie Smith, for caring about preserving this historic cemetery and sponsoring SB 256 Robbie Oxoby, Project Manager, Public Works, for coordinating with all parties and making this historic cemetery’s monument and fencing a reality and all other staff at public works Candace Wheeler and Alexis Dillon, for preparing a master plan for the cemetery and for their support and research efforts Arlan Melendez, Chairman, Reno/Sparks Indian Colony, for his advice on Native American burials and his support of this monument and historic cemetery Brian Worcester, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Camp Sec/Treasurer; Nevada Governor for the Order of Founders and Patriots of America, Deputy Governor for the Sons and Daughters of the Pilgrims, Nevada Trustee for the Sons of the American Revolution and member American Legion Post 56 115
  • 116. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Kim Henrick and Rosie Cevasco, Historic Reno Preservation Society Susan Searcy, Nevada State Library and Archives, for tirelessly searching for documents University of Nevada Reno Library University of Nevada School of Medicine University of Nevada Las Vegas DeLaMare Library Washoe County Library 116
  • 117. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. California State University, UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library Washoe County Coroner’s Office Walton’s Funeral Home, Tammy Dermody, Owner, whose team of professionals handled those who were reinterred. Matthew Budak, who was responsible for carefully exhuming remains to be reinterred Kim Hopkinson, Archeologist Mark Picker, Esq., Friends Legal Counsel Ross Knobel Sparks Police Department Nevada Legislature Research Library 117
  • 118. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Rob Graffio, Attorney, Catholic Church Canon Law Reno Diocese of the Catholic Church Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War Washoe County Recorder Commission for the Preservation of Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries and Landmarks of the West Tammy Krikorian, Reno Gazette Journal, Ed Pearce and Terry Russell, KOLO TV, for covering all sides of this issue Cheryl Obos, for photography 118
  • 119. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Luana Ritch, Chief, Bureau Health Planning & Statistics   Alice Baldrica, Office of Cultural Affairs Edward K. Foster, Nevada Department of Agriculture, for working with our concerns on the cemetery Marilyn Newton Harry Ferris Hedy Weston Don Hotchkiss Melissa Robards 119
  • 120. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Bruce Borchert Dee and Al Schiavone Jennifer Frotton/Portland General Electric Dianne Smail Tressa Remic Judith Fuller Martha Tews Prudence Muran 120
  • 121. Thank you to all of the people who made this possible. Alice Baldrica and Michael Fischer, Department of Cultural Affairs   Eric Moody, Nevada Historical Society Paul Noell Courtney Mooney Ross Knobel 121 This list is by no means comprehensive as there were countless individual citizens who wrote letters of support for this cemetery. If your name is not included, we apologize, and thank you for your support.
  • 122. The End PowerPoint created in 2010 for the Dedication of the Historic Northern Nevada Adult Mental Services Cemetery January 21, 2011 by, Lorraine Riehl Hermiston In collaboration with Carolyn Riehl Mirich Descendants of Nevada Pioneers Cousins of Cora Wilcox Clark Unknown Gravesite Dedicated to Friends of Northern Nevada Mental Health Services Cemetery They thought they could, they did 122