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Presentation used during the first day of class of LAHS 333: Approaches to Visual Culture, at Berklee College of Music.

Presentation used during the first day of class of LAHS 333: Approaches to Visual Culture, at Berklee College of Music.

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  • What does Sargent experiment with?
  • That’s not the culture we’re in, though. We inherit a mainstream American culture based on advertising. Commodification of images has a long history, but we can start thinking about the time when mass consumer culture became “modern”—in the 1920s, the time when moving pictures, still images in print, and fashion all reinforced each other in an increasingly national web of production and consumption in which people were encouraged to define themselves primarily as consumers (by what they bought, wore, saw, and owned) rather than by what they made or did. These ads still have a lot of copy—but that was shifting, too, towards more images, in the attempt to persuade and tempt the consumers to buy the product.
  • Now there is no need for the word “Nike,” only the icon, and people gladly pay to walk around with it emblazoned on their chests.
  • People will also contribute small amounts of money, like $10, to campaigns such as the one to keep the Lime Green Icicle Tower at the MFA.
  • We need to think about visual culture as we experience it now, which means through networked and digital technology, like the internet. Think about how many pictures you take, how many pictures there are of you, and what they are for. Think about how many images you can access of any given object, and how you would do that.
  • Now, let’s think about ads, and with a partner, make an ad. First we’ll look at some spoof ads that parody real ads, pointing out the visual and emotional rhetoric of much advertising to bring some popular strategies into relief and get you thinking critically about something so ubiquitous. Then you’ll make your ads and we’ll share them at the end of class.

Transcript

  • 1. Dr. Lori Landay
  • 2. The Treason of ImagesRené Magritte1928-29
  • 3. Apollo and the Muses on Mount HeliconClaude Lorrain1680 Oil on canvas99.7 x 136.5 cm (39 1/4 x 53 3/4 in.)Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • 4. The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, John Singer Sargent, 1882
  • 5. Standing FigurePablo Picasso1908 Oil on canvas150.2 x 100.3 cm (59 1/8 x 39 1/2 in.)Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • 6. Nude Descending A StaircaseMarcel Duchamp1912
  • 7. Delta GammaMorris Louis, American, 1959Acrylic solution (Magna) on canvas262.3 x 382.6 cm (103 1/4 x 150 5/8 in.)Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • 8. The Artist in His LoftGeorge Segal, American,1969Plaster, wood, glass, porcelain, &metalOverall: 228.6 x 175.3 x 152.4 cm (90 x 69 x 60 in.)Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • 9. Self-PortraitChuck Close1997Oil on canvas102 x 84MoMA, NY
  • 10. Dale Chihuly, Lime Green Icicle Tower, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
  • 11. VISUAL CULTURE & THE IMAGEDATABASE
  • 12. VISUAL CULTURE & MEDIA- MAKING
  • 13. VISUAL CULTURE & IDENTITY
  • 14. VISUAL CULTURE & INTERFACE
  • 15. VISUAL CULTURE & COMPUTER-GENERATED ENVIRONMENTSHow are we going to study Visual Culture?
  • 16. How are we going to study Visual Culture?
  • 17. creatively & critically
  • 18. from Understanding Comics,Scott McCloud
  • 19. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • 20. Visual culture ismedia culture.
  • 21. Spoof adsCreate yourown ad