Museums & Mobile in 2012 : Survey Results

  • 15,457 views
Uploaded on

An analysis of the main findings from the 2012 Museums & Mobile Survey. …

An analysis of the main findings from the 2012 Museums & Mobile Survey.

Learn about the museum community's perspective on the objectives, challenges & future for mobile projects in cultural institutions in 2012.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
15,457
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
12

Actions

Shares
Downloads
457
Comments
5
Likes
18

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. MUSEUMS &!MOBILE IN 2012 !An analysis of the Museums & Mobile Survey 2012 responses!!!Loïc Tallon, Pocket-Proof.!Survey produced by Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes.!February 2012 Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 1
  • 2. THE MUSEUMS & MOBILE SURVEY 2012 PARTICIPANTS:* #1 BFTS Museum | 1792 Productions | Adler Planetarium | Alabama Historical Commission | AlaskaNative Heritage Center | American Museum of Natural History | American Museum of Science and Energy | Amgueddfa Cymru National Museum Wales | Anderson Arts Center | Armory Centerfor the Arts | Arrow Rock State Historic Site | Art Association of Harrisburg | Art Gallery of Ontario | Artemisia Technologies | Arvid E Miller Memorial Library/Museum | Ashmolean Museum |AZ Historical Society | Bainbridge Island Historical Museum | Bay Area Discovery Museum | Beaver County Historical Research and Landmarks Foundation | Bergstrom-Mahler Museum |Biedenharn Coca-Cola Museum | Birmingham Museum of Art | Bishop Museum | Blue & Gray Museum | Boonshoft Museum of Discovery | Boulder History Museum | British Museum |Broadcastr | Brooklyn Childrens Museum | Brookside Museum | Brunswick Railroad Museum | Canadian Museum for Human Rights | Canadian Museum of Civilization | Canadian Museum ofNature | Canadian Museum of Nature | Cannon Beach History Center & Museum | Cape Fear Museum of History and Science | Carnegie Center for Art & History | Carnegie Museum ofMontgomery County | Chabot Space & Science Center | Charleston Museum | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Chemung County Historical Society | Cheney Historical Museum | Chesterwood(National Trust for Historic Preservation) | Chicago Maritime Museum | Childrens Museum of Tacoma | Chippewa Valley Museum | Christine Lockett Associates: Cultural Intelligence | ChurchHistory Museum | Cinematheque Francaise | City of Hamilton Museums | Clinton House Museum | College Montmorency | Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center | Corning Museum of Glass |Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Museum of Technology | Cortina Productions | Costa Mesa Historical Society | Crocker Art Museum | Crystal Bridges Museum of AmericanArt | CT Humanities Council | DUva Workshop | Dacotah Prairie Museum | Daly House Museum | Danish Nature Agency | Dartmouth Museum | Dauphin Islkand Sea Lab | DeBence AntiqueMusic World | Decorative Arts Center of Ohio | DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum | Dell Rapids Society for Historic Preservation | Des Plaines History Center | Design in Three Dimensions |Dixon Gallery and Gardens | Drayton Hall | DREAM, SDU. | Drexel University | East Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc. | EightSixSix Consulting | Eli Whitney Museum | Engaging Places, LLC |English Heritage | Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum | Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum | Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum | Everhart Museum of Natural History, Science & Art |Experimentarium | Federal Reserve Bank of Boston | Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond | Fleming Museum of Art | Florida Museum of Photographic Arts | Foundation of NYS Nurses (BellevueAlumnae Center for Nursing History) | Fox Island Historical Society Museum, Fox Island, WA | Freelance Consultant | Frisco Historic Park & Museum | Galt Museum & Archives | GearWorks ApS| George M. Murrell Home | GIA | Gooding County Historical Society Museum | Gooding County Historical Society Museum | Gore Place | Grand Encampment Museum | Greece HistoricalSociety | GriZine | Guggenheim Museum | Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland | Hammer Museum | Hanford Mills Museum | Harn Museum of Art | Harvard University Herbaria |Hickory Hill | Higgins Armory Museum | High Plains Womens Museum | Historic Deerfield | Historic Dumfries | Historic New England | Historic New Harmony | Historic Rugby Inc. | HistoricalSociety of Pennsylvania | History Colorado | HistoryMiami | Holocaust Memorial Center | Holter Museum of Art | Hong Kong Maritime Museum | Horniman Museum and Gardens | IcebreakerMackinaw Maritime Museum, Inc. | Illinois State Museum | Indianapolis Museum of Art | International Quilt Study Center & Museum | Iolani Palace | Ipswich Museum | Iron Work Farm inActon | IWM | IZITEQ | J. Paul Getty Trust | J.F. Willumsens Museum | Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum | Johns Hopkins University | Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art | Joslyn ArtMuseum | Juneau-Douglas City Museum | Køge Byhistoriske Arkiv | Kapesni LLC | Kelley House Museum | Kiasma | Kunsten | LA Maritime Museum | La Salle University Art Museum | LakeCounty Discovery Museum | Lakeshore Museum Center | Lakewoods Heritage Center | Landsnetvarket for Folkekirkens Skoletjeneste | Leffingwell House Museum | Lincoln Park Zoo | LogCabin Village | Longo Consulting LLC | Longue Vue House and Gardens | Lopez Memorial Museum and Library | Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust | Louisiana Art & Science Museum |Lowell Parks & Conservation Trust, Inc. | Lower East Side Tenement Museum | Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art | Maine State Museum | Mariemont Preservation Foundation | Marthas VineyardMuseum | Mattress Factory | McKinley County Government | McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina | McNay Art Museum | Memorial Art Gallery | Memorial Art Gallery of University ofRochester | Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Michigan State University | Michigan Supreme Court Historical Society | Mid-America Arts Alliance | Middlesex County Cultural and HeritageCommission | Milford Historical Society | Mingei International Museum | Minster Historical Museum | Mission Houses Museum | Missouri Department of Conservation | Moffatt-Ladd House |MOMA | MonDak Heritage Center | MUMOK Museum of modern Art | Musee des Beaux-Arts de Montreal | Musee dHistoire de Nantes | Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico | Museo de Historia,Antropoogía y Arte | Museo Dolores Olmedo | Museo Nacional de Historia Natural | Museum 2.0 Barcelona | Museum Midtjylland | Museum of Computing @ Swindon | Museum ofcontemporary art, Lyon | Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney | Museum of English Rural Life | Museum of Health Care | Museum of Inuit Art | Museum of Life and Science | Museum ofLondon | Museum of Nature & Science | Museum of Photographic Arts | Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago | Museum of Science, Boston | Museum of the Grand Prairie | MuseumVictoria | Museums Association of Saskatchewan | Naper Settlement | Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site | National Bonsai & Penjing Museum | National Building Museum | NationalCenter for Preservation Technology & Training | National Civil Rights Museum | National Gallery | National Gallery of Canada | National Hellenic Museum | National Maritime Museum | NationalMuseum of Australia | National Museum of Nuclear Science & History | National Museum of Wildlife Art | National Museums Scotland | National Portrait Gallery | National Sprint Car Hall ofFame & Museum | National Underground Railroad Freedom Center | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art | Neuberger Museum of Art | Neville Public Museum of Brown County, WI | New Mexico HistoryMuseum/Palace of the Governors | New York Botanical Garden | Nez Perce National Historical Park | Niagara Historical Society & Museum | Nohwike Bagowa Museum | Nora Eccles HarrisonMuseum of Art | Nordiska museet | Norman Rockwell Museum | North Canton Heritage Society | North Carolina Museum of History | Northwest African American Museum | Northwest Museumof Arts & Culture | Odense City Museums | Oklahoma City Museum of Art | Old North Foundation of Boston, Inc. | OMSI | OnCell Systems | Oshkosh Public Museum | Owens Community College| Pacific Science Center | Parks Canada Agency | Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology | Pennsylvania Hospital | Peoria Historical Society | Plymouth Antiquarian Society | Politecnicodi Torino | Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach | Prince Georges County Memorial Library | Project Manager | PS2 arquitetura + design | Pueblo Grande Museum | Quinlan Visual ArtsCenter | Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden | Restigouche Regional Museum | Reynolda House | Rijksmuseum Amsterdam | Riley Centeer/Museum | RISD Museum of Art | Rosson HouseMuseum | Royal BC Museum | Royal Pavilion and Museums, Brighton & Hove | Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp | Ruthmere Museum | Sagnlandet Lejre | saint louis art museum | SaintLouis Art Museum | San Jacinto Museum of History | Sandy Davis Communications | Santa Fe Botanical Garden | Santa Fe Trail Center Museum & Research Library | SBMH SHS |Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center | Science Museum of MN | Science World | Scurry County Museum | Seabridge | Sedalia Museum | SFMOMA | SFO Museum | sgscripts | SharlotHall Museum | Sheldon | Shiloh Museum of Ozark History | Shofuso Japanese House and Garden | SI | SIUE | Sloan Museum | Sloan*Longway | Smiths Castle at Cocumscussoc |Smithsonian NMAI | SOMArts Cultural Center | Springfield Art Association | Springs Museum | St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum | St. Johnsbury Athenaeum | State Historical Society ofNorth Dakota | State Museum of Pennsylvania | Statens Museum for Kunst | Susan B Anthony House | Tairawhiti Museum | Teh Danish Museum of Science and Technology | Tellus ScienceMuseum | Texas State History Museum | The British Postal Museum & Archive | The Bundy Museum of History & Art | The Cleveland Museum of Art | The Drexel Collection, Drexel University,Philadelphia, PA | The Fitzwilliam Museum | The Henry Ford | The Hermitage: Home of President Andrew Jackson | The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County | The Margaret R. GrundyMemorial Museum | The Mariners Museum | The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science | The Royal Collection | Tohono Chul Park | Toledo Museum of Art | Tryon Palace | Tyler Museum ofArt | University Museum, SIUC | University of Michigan Museum of Art | USF Contemporary Art Museum | Utah Museum of Fine Arts | Utrecht University | Vejle Kunstmuseum | VendsysselHistoriske Museum | Victorian and Albert Museum | Virginia Museum of Fine Arts | VMFA | Warrenville Historical Musuem & Art Gallery | Waterton Lakes National Park | Weisman Art Museum| Wellcome Collection | West Florida Historic Preservation, Inc. | Wildlife Conservation Society | Williamson Museum | Wisconsin Maritime Museum | World Figure Skating Museum & Hall ofFame | Wyoming State Museum | Yiddish Book Center | Youth Science Center. * Only those institutions that ‘opted in’ to being identified are listed. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 2
  • 3. Thank you to everyone who participated in the Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. This is the third year of the survey,and once again the response to the survey has been overwhelming: we’re delighted to have had over 600 participants!In this report you’ll find an analysis of all the main points from the survey. Also this year we’ve focused a little more ontwo particular mobile strands we we think are of timely interest to the community.•  The first is the type, cost and hardware platform of an institutions mobile experience. Our aim here is to help inform decisions on whether an institution’s mobile experience be an in-gallery or out-of-gallery experience, be available free or at additional cost, and be accessible on the users smartphone or on a museum provided device.•  And the second is the relationships between an institution’s size, and the type, objectives and challenges of the mobile experience they offer. We hope these analysis will advance existing discussions on the types of mobile experiences that are most successful for differently resourced institutions.We hope you find these analyses valuable.Thank you for all the feedback we’ve received about the survey. Our aim is to keep the survey as universal andstraight forward as possible. Nonetheless it feels a little inevitable that as the definition of what constitutes a mobileexperience expands into apps and mobile web sites, and as institutions start to offer a range of different mobileexperiences, structuring a museum mobile survey so that it remain accessible, simple and informative becomes morechallenging. Your suggestions on how to overcome these challenge are always welcome, and we look forward towatching the debate about what museums mean by ‘mobile’ evolve in the coming months.And finally, a big thank you to all the team at LearningTimes and Pocket-Proof for their amazing hard work on thisproject, without which this report would not be possible.Good luck everyone with your mobile projects in 2012! Loic Tallon. Pocket-Proof. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 3
  • 4. about  What type & size of institutions responded to the 2012 Survey?   & are there trends in the types or sizes of institutions using mobile? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 4
  • 5. about1.1 The Museum & Mobile Survey 2012 was launched in late-November 2011. Responses to the survey were solicited through the Museums-Mobile.org email subscribers, the LearningTimes newsletter, the MCG listserv, the MCN listserv, the Culture24 newsletter, the Future for Museums Facebook group, and on Twitter via the #mtogo hashtag.1.2 By the time the survey closed in early-January 2012, we had received responses from 615 individuals working within the field of mobile, either in a museum or as a vendor / researcher.1.3 78% (480) of all respondents came from the USA, with 5% (33) from both the United Kingdom and Canada. In total, responses to the survey were received from 24 countries.1.4 Of the 554 survey respondents currently working in a museum: 177 worked in an institution that currently offered a mobile experience. •  165 worked in an institution that had plans to launch their first mobile experience in the next 12 months. •  212 worked in an institution that was not currently using mobile, nor had plans to do so. (Figure 1)1.5 Individuals working in a History Museums made up the largest proportion of respondents from a museum (25% / 141 respondents). These were followed by Art Museums / Galleries (20% / 113), Local Heritage Museums (10% / 53) and Monuments / Historical Sites (8% / 46). (Figure 2) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 5
  • 6. about1.6 Similar to 2011, survey respondents from an Art Museum / Gallery were more likely to already be offering a mobile experience to their visitors than their counterparts in a History Museum. Over half of all respondents from a History Museum reported that their institution was not currently using mobile, nor had any plans to do so: the equivalent figure from those working in an Art Museum was 20%. (Figure 3)1.7 Over half of all respondents working in a museum reported an annual attendance of under 50,000 visitors. One-in-five reported an annual attendance of over 250,000 visitors annually. (Figure 4)1.8 There was close correlation between whether a respondent’s institution was currently offering a mobile experience and the annual attendance of that institution, with the ‘pivot’ point being at c.250,000 annual visitors, above which a majority of respondents’ institutions offered a mobile experience. 55% of respondents from institution with annual attendance of under 50,000 visitors were not currently offering mobile nor had plans to. (Figure 5) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 6
  • 7. Figure 1 // Proportion of survey respondents that currently offer amobile experience at their institution. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 7
  • 8. Figure 2 // Survey respondents by type of institution vs. whether thatinstitution currently offers a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 8
  • 9. Figure 3 // Survey respondents by whether that institution currentlyoffers a mobile experience vs. the type of institution. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 9
  • 10. Figure 4 // Survey respondents by annual attendance vs. whether thatinstitution currently offers a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 10
  • 11. Figure 5 // Proportional representation of survey respondents byannual attendance vs. whether that institution currently offers amobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 11
  • 12. type & platform  What type of mobile experience are institutions offering?  Are the mobile experiences free or a paid extra?  Are visitors required to use their own hardware, and if so is this factor related to the size of an institution? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 12
  • 13. type & platform2.1 63% of respondents from an institution that either offered a mobile experience, or which were planning to do so, defined their mobile experience as an on-site / in- gallery enhancement to the museum visit. However those institutions that were planning their first mobile experience were more likely to be developing an off-site experience compared to their counterparts in institutions that already offered a mobile experience. (Figure 6)2.2 Of those respondents from institutions currently offering a mobile experience, or which were planning to do so, over 70% reported that the mobile experience was free to visitors: just 10% reported that it was available at an additional cost. (Figure 7)2.3 The majority of respondents from institutions that currently offered a mobile experience provided the hardware for that experience to visitors, though half of these also made that experience available to visitors via there own smartphone. A significantly greater proportion of institutions that were planning their first mobile experience were more likely to require visitors to use their own smartphone / hardware. (Figure 8)2.4 Whilst there was little discernable relationship between the type of mobile experience and its cost to the visitor (Figure 9), a relationship was evident between the cost of the mobile experience and whether visitors had to use their own hardware to access that experience. (Figure 10)2.5 There was little discernable relationship between the size of an institution and whether that institution requires visitors to use their own smartphone / hardware to access its mobile experience. (Figure 11) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 13
  • 14. Figure 6 // Type of mobile experience by those institutions thatcurrently offer / have plans to offer a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 14
  • 15. Figure 7 // Cost of the mobile experience by those institutions thatcurrently offer / have plans to offer a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 15
  • 16. Figure 8 // Hardware platform of the mobile experience by thoseinstitutions that currently offer / have plans to offer a mobileexperience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 16
  • 17. Figure 9 // Cost to the visitor to use the mobile experience vs. thetype of the mobile experience, (focused on institutions currentlyoffering a mobile experience only). Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 17
  • 18. Figure 10 // Cost to the visitor to use the mobile experience vs. thehardware platform on which visitors access the mobile experience,(focused on institutions currently offering a mobile experience only). Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 18
  • 19. Figure 11 // Proportional representation of annual attendance vs. thehardware platform on which the visitor access the mobile experience,(focused on institutions currently offering a mobile experience only). Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 19
  • 20. audience  What type of audience are the mobile experiences targeted towards?  Is the target audience linked to whether a visitor uses their own smartphone? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 20
  • 21. audience3.1 The top five terms used to describe the target audience of the mobile experience currently offered by, or planned by, museums are:* •  Tourists (55%) •  Visitors to the institution (56%) •  Adult visitors (55%) •  All visitors (47%) •  Those that like audio guides (41%)3.2 Museum that are planning their first mobile experience are more inclined than those institutions with an existing mobile experience to define their target audience in relation to a visit to the institution.* 3.3 Those institutions that were planning to offer their first mobile experience were more likely than those institutions already offering a mobile experience to identify the following visitor groups as the target audience of their mobile experience: •  School groups.* •  Twitter & Facebook users. •  Local community. •  Those wanting a more playful experience. 3.4 Those institutions already offering a mobile experience were were more likely than those institutions planning to offer their first mobile experience to identify the following visitor groups as the target audience of their mobile experience:* •  Those that like audio guides. •  Adults. * (Figure 12). Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 21
  • 22. audience3.5 In some cases, the relationship between the target audience was linked to the hardware platform a visitor must use to access the mobile experience. For example: •  Institutions were unlikely to target “Twitter and Facebook users” for an experience only available on a hardware visitors must borrow from the institution. •  For a target audience of “Those that like audio guides”, it was less likely that an institution would make the mobile experience only accessible on a visitors own hardware. •  If the target audience was “those wanting a more in-depth experience,” institutions were most likely to have the experience only available on a hardware the visitor must borrow from the institution. (Figure 13)3.6 Those institutions that offered their mobile experience both on visitors’ own hardware and on a hardware the visitor could borrow from the institution, were more likely to have a broad-description / multi-category target audience than those institutions that offered the mobile experience only on a visitors hardware or only on a hardware the visitor could borrow from the institution. (Figure 13) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 22
  • 23. Figure 12 // Target audience of the mobile experience of thoseinstitutions that currently offer / have plans to offer mobile. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 23
  • 24. Figure 13 // Target audience of the mobile experience of thoseinstitutions that currently offer and have plans to offer mobile vs. thehardware platform visitors use to access the mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 24
  • 25. objectives  What are the objectives of your institution’s mobile experience?  Are the objectives of the mobile experience linked to the type of experience? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 25
  • 26. objectives4.1 Whether or not the institution currently offered a mobile experience, and / or was planning to offer a mobile experience, institutions identified the same four points as the primary objectives of their / a mobile experience. These were: •  To provide additional interpretation information to visitors. •  As part of institution’s experimentation in engaging visitors. •  To provide a more interactive experience. •  To raise the profile of the institution with new audiences. (Figure 14-16)4.2 Among the main differences in objectives for their / a mobile experience between institutions that currently offered, were planning to offer, or were not planning to offer, were: •  Institutions that currently offered a mobile experience were the least likely to identify revenue generation as an important objective of their mobile experience. •  Conversely, institutions that did not currently offer, or plan to offer, a mobile experience were the most likely to see revenue generation as an important objective of an institution’s mobile experience. •  Institutions that did not currently offer, or plan to offer, a mobile experience were the least likely to see “to keep up with museum practices” and “as part of the institutions experimentation in engaging visitors” as important objective of an institution’s mobile experience. •  And Vendors / Researchers were more likely than institutions to view “to raise the profile of the institution”, “to satisfy visitor demand”, “to facilitate way-finding through the site”, “to provide better access for visitors with special needs” and “as a foreign language provision” as important objectives of an institution’s mobile experience. (Figure 17) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 26
  • 27. objectives4.3 For those institutions that currently offered, or were planning to offer, a mobile experience that was an on-site / in-gallery enhancement to the visitor experience, the objectives most likely to be “Very important” for their mobile experience were: * •  To provide additional interpretation information to visitors. (75%) •  As part of institution’s experimentation in engaging visitors. (70%) •  To provide a more interactive experience. (62%) •  To keep up with current museum practices. (45%)4.4 For mobile experiences that were an off-site enhancement to a past of future visit to the institution, the objectives most likely to be “Very important” were: * •  As part of institution’s experimentation in engaging visitors. (67%) •  To provide additional interpretation information to visitors. (64%) •  To raise the profile of the institution with new audiences. (61%) •  To attract new visitors to the institution. (58%)4.5 And for mobile experience that were an off-site stand-alone experience, the objectives most likely to be “Very important” were: * •  To raise the profile of the institution with new audiences. (64%) •  To attract new visitors to the institution. (59%) •  As part of institution’s experimentation in engaging visitors. (57%) •  To provide additional interpretation information to visitors. (50%) * (Figure 18) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 27
  • 28. objectives4.6 There were differences in the “Very important” objectives of the mobile experience currently offered, or planned, by an institution based on the hardware platform the visitor used to access the mobile experience. Among the main differences were: •  An institution that identified “to keep up with museum practice” as an objective of their mobile experience was more likely to give the visitor the choice of accessing the mobile experience on their own mobile platform or on a device they could borrow from the institution. •  Institution’s that positioned their mobile experience as part of their experimentation in how to engage visitors were more likely to make that experience accessible on a hardware owned by the visitor than on a hardware they must borrow from the institution. •  If specific funds had been made available for the mobile experience, it was deemed more important that the institution provide a hardware which the visitor may borrow to access the mobile experience. (Figure 19) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 28
  • 29. Figure 14 // Objectives of their institution’s mobile experience, asseen by those institutions that currently offer a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 29
  • 30. Figure 15 // Objectives of their institution’s planned mobileexperience, as seen by those institutions that no not currently offer amobile experience, but have plans to do so in the next 12 months. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 30
  • 31. Figure 16 // Objectives of an institution’s mobile experience as seenby those institutions that currently do not offer a mobile experience,nor have any plans to do so. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 31
  • 32. Figure 17 // Objectives deemed “Very Important” by all surveyrespondents vs. whether their institution currently offers a mobileexperience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 32
  • 33. Figure 18 // Objectives deemed “Very Important” of the mobileexperience of those institutions that currently offer and have plans tooffer mobile vs. the type of mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 33
  • 34. Figure 19 // Objectives deemed “Very Important” of the mobile experienceof those institutions that currently offer and have plans to offer mobile vs.the hardware platform visitors use to access the mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 34
  • 35. no mobile  Of those institutions that don’t use mobile, and have no plans to, why not? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 35
  • 36. no mobile5.1 Of those institutions that neither currently offer a mobile experience, nor have plans to do so, the most popular response to ‘why not?’ related to the maintenance of the experience as opposed to its implementation. (Figure 20)5.2 Of the 21% of responses that felt that the reason their institution did not use mobile was not covered by the options provided, a selection of the responses were as follows: “I actually want to say ‘All of the above’. Our Director just does not see mobile apps as being relevant.” “Our location does not have good mobile reception. Were kind of in a ‘no service’ pocket.” “We are inexperienced in the field, both in determining its value and in implementing it.” “All of the above.” “Board at this time feels being open is enough.” “Both too expensive and insufficient staff to operate/maintain.” “We attempted an audio tour that did not see to be utilized.” “I want to but only have time to do so much.” “Almost all of the above.” Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 36
  • 37. Figure 20 // Reason for not offering a mobile experience by thoseinstitutions that currently do not offer a mobile experience, nor haveany plans to do so. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 37
  • 38. challenges  What is the greatest challenge in developing and delivering a mobile experience?  How are these challenges linked to the type of experience an institution chooses to develop? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 38
  • 39. challenges6.1 Institutions that did not currently offer, or were planning to offer, a mobile experience perceived the challenges of developing and operating a mobile experience to significantly greater than either an institution that currently offered a mobile experience, or an institution that was planning to offer their first mobile experience. (Figure 21)6.2 The three aspects of developing and operating a mobile experience that were identified as most challenging by those institutions that currently offered a mobile experience were: •  Keeping the experience up-to-date. •  Encouraging take-up of the mobile experience. •  Production of the content. (Figure 22)6.3 Institutions that were planning their first mobile experience, and institutions that did not currently offer, or were planning to offer a mobile experience, identified the same aspects of developing and operating a mobile experience as most challenging. These were: •  Cost of sustaining the mobile experience. •  Cost of maintaining the mobile experience. •  Keeping the experience up-to-date. (Figure 22)6.4 Overall, the aspect of developing and delivering a mobile experience that was identified as most challenging by all institutions was “keeping the experience up-to- date.” (Figure 22). This aligns with the reason given for not offering a mobile experience given by those institutions that did not currently offer, or were planning to offer a mobile experience, i.e. insufficient staff to operate / maintain the experience. (See 5.1) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 39
  • 40. challenges6.5 “Encouraging people to take the mobile experience” was the only aspect of developing and operating a mobile experience that institutions who did not currently offer a mobile experience perceived to be less challenging than those institutions that currently did offer a mobile experience. (Figure 21)6.6 The other aspect more readily identified as a big challenge by institutions that currently offered mobile than by institutions that did not, was “production of the content.” (Figure 22)6.7 Among institutions that currently offered a mobile experience, there were differences in the main challenges those institutions faced in developing and operating a mobile experience based on the type of mobile experience they were offering. Among the main differences were: •  Institutions that offered an off-site enhancement to a future or past visit to the institution were more likely to identify both the design and technical development of the mobile experience as very challenging. •  The cost of implementing and sustaining a mobile experience was considered to be a greater challenge for an in-gallery mobile experience than for an off-site mobile experience. •  Ensuring the mobile experience supported the mission of the institution was deemed a greater challenge for off-site experiences than for on-site experiences. (Figure 23) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 40
  • 41. Figure 21 // Challenges deemed “Very Challenging” for developing &operating a mobile experience vs. whether that institution currentlyoffers a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 41
  • 42. Figure 22 // Ranked view of challenges deemed “Very Challenging”for developing & operating a mobile experience vs. whether thatinstitution currently offers a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 42
  • 43. Figure 23 // Ranked view of challenges deemed “Very Challenging” fordeveloping & operating a mobile experience vs. the type of mobile experience,(focused on institutions currently offering a mobile experience only). Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 43
  • 44. take-up  Is the challenge of encouraging visitors to take-up the mobile experience linked to cost?  Is the challenge linked to whether the visitor can access the mobile experience on their own smartphone? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 44
  • 45. distribution7.1 Among institutions that currently offer a mobile experience, encouraging visitors to take the mobile experience was deemed less challenging by institutions who made the experience available free-of-charge than by institutions that charged extra for the mobile experience. Nonetheless, it was ranked respectively as the greatest and second-greatest challenge of developing and operating a mobile experience by each type of institution. (Figure 24)7.2 Whether the experience was available only on a hardware that the visitor borrowed from the institution, or was also available on a visitors own hardware did not have a significant effect on the challenge institutions faced in encouraging visitors to use the mobile experience. (Figure 24) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 45
  • 46. Figure 24 // Challenge of encouraging a visitor to take a mobileexperience vs. 1) the cost to the visitor to use mobile experience, and2) the hardware platform visitors use to access the mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 46
  • 47. future  Where will museum mobile be in two years time?  Do museums that currently offer a mobile experience see the future differently to those that do not currently use mobile?  And how does the size of an institution affect its vision for the future? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 47
  • 48. future8.1 Despite variation in those aspects of mobile which an institution has already implemented, institutions that already offer a mobile experience and institutions that are planning to offer a mobile experience have a similar vision of what their institution will and will not have implemented, within the field of mobile, in the next two years. (Figures 25-26)8.2 The three aspects relating to mobile which institutions that currently offer a mobile experience, and institutions that are planning to offer mobile experience, are most likely to have implemented within the next two years are: •  Increased in-house content production for mobile. •  A strategy for mobile at the institution. •  Development of a web site optimised for mobile. (Figures 25-26)8.3 Institutions which currently offer a mobile experience and institutions that are planning their first mobile experience envision it as more likely that they will have a web site optimised for mobile than a smartphone application within the next two years. (Figures 27)8.4 Relationships exist between an institutions vision of where they will be with mobile in two years time, and the annual attendance (or size?) of their institution. These include: •  The aspect of mobile for which there is the greatest variance in relation to the institution’s annual attendance, is whether the institution will install a free public Wi-Fi network within the next two years. •  The increased production of content in-house content production appears to have little correlation to annual attendance of an institution. (Figure 28) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 48
  • 49. Figure 25 // Future / next two years of mobile experiences atinstitutions that currently offer a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 49
  • 50. Figure 26 // Future / next two years of mobile experiences atinstitutions that do not currently offer a mobile experience, but haveplans to do so in the next 12 months. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 50
  • 51. Figure 27 // Features of mobile experiences that are “AlreadyImplemented” or “Will Definitely Implement” in the next two years vs.whether that institution currently offers a mobile experience. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 51
  • 52. Figure 28 // Features of mobile experiences that are “Already Implemented” or“Will Definitely Implement” in the next two at institutions that currently offer, orhave plans to offer, a mobile experience vs. the annual attendance of the institution. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 52
  • 53. favorite!mobile exp.?  What is your favorite museum mobile experience of 2011? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 53
  • 54. and finally... Out of all the museum mobile experiences you havetaken in the past 12 months, which is your favorite?!Yes, Currently using mobile. (A selection) "911 memorial. Real sense of place. | A historic area in a Houston, TX park. Several restored houses were arrangedin a beautiful setting, on the outdoor signage was a number to call on your own cell phone. It was easy and addedadditional information about the houses and their history, it did not repeat the information provided on the signage. |AB EX NY iPad app by MoMA - because its beautifully executed, has a seamless UX, and makes use of the mobiledevices specific functionalities in meaningful ways (web access, multimedia, interactive map) | Antenna audio tourfor Birth of Impressionism exhibit which traveled from the Musee dOrsay. It added so much more information to theexperience (I went to the exhibit 3 times and listed to the audio all three times) and was much easier than crowdingaround the paintings to read the labels which were in a much too small typeface (in order to minimize their presence?)| Audio guides. | Augmented Reality - the visual expereince of the then & nows are cool! | Augusta Canal NationalHeritage Area. Augmented Reality is not perfect technology yet, but is exactly along the lines of what we hope to doin 2012 -- has great potential for our site in seeing the layers of history that are no longer visible -- in doing so, wehope to more strongly reinforce the historical importance of our site to the South Carolina Lowcountry and to thenation. | CNAPn application for iPhone. | Have not experienced any. | Hmm... in last 12 months. Prolly LeafSnap || Indianapolis Museum of Art TAP Tour of the Tara Donovan exhibition. | Just Add Art - Bonnefantenmuseum:simple, user-centric, fun, unique | Montreal Museum of Fine Arts musical audio tour for Tiffany exhibition | Ours, itwas fun to get our feet wet with the technology | Sadly I have had little time to go outside of work to anywhere withnew mobile experiences in the past year and prefer personal contact to find out information. I have in the pastenjoyed way finding apps at larger institutions. | smartphones | TATE trumps. I have not tried it on site, but it seemsthat this app really take in consideration the use of smartphones, not only used as a digitalized catalogue. But usesthe technologies capability for interaction in a playful way | website and app. talesofthings--lets you comment onmuseum artifacts Website and app. Search the collections of the Victoria & Albert museum--awesome to see whatthey have. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 54
  • 55. and finally... Out of all the museum mobile experiences you havetaken in the past 12 months, which is your favorite?!No mobile, but have plans to. (A selection) "Augmented reality guide at the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, WI | Augmented Reality walking toursfascinate me, and I have used AR apps that were games or interactive advertisements, but I have not been able toexperience an on-site AR tour. I would LOVE to take the Museum of London Street Museum tour one day, which Ihave only read about online. Second to that, QR codes with additional online content are always nice when Im inother museums. | Canadian War Museum... it allowed us to see something that we could emulate, and itsshortcomings showed us many places that we could improve upon for our own application. | Have never tried one.That kind of technology is new to me. | Havent taken one to be honest | Historypin. It works, its relevant, itssmooth. | I have enjoyed the experience at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. I didnt have to pick up the audio tour -just relied on my telephone. The content was well-written. | I have not had the opportunity to do so. | I haventexperienced a museum mobile experience in the past 12 months because I live in a small community in New Mexico.We have a large, historic New Deal Art Collection and an historic Courthouse where the collection should be housed.Developing a museum-mobile experience for tourists, residents and schools seems ideal for our needs. | I haventtaken a museum mobile experience in the past 12 months. | Met Museum Guitar application -- good use of theproperties of the medium in an accessible and engaging way. | MOMA | MoMA Ab Ex, for its content, aesthetic,creativity and diverse sets of knowledge | Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Black History Museum. Very educational, butshort enough to make the visit doable within a limited time block; animated characters engaging and providedauthenticity to understanding the history. | Sadly, none. Not one mobile experience Ive personally had felt like itreally connected me with the museum. | Tate trumps - kept me occupied, entertaining, learned about my own artpreferences and offered the facility to interact with other users. And simple - not bogged down with hard to learnfunctionality. | The dinosaur app from the American Museum of Natural History, because it is engaging andeducational. | Western Heritage Center, Billings, because it provides additional interesting factual information nototherwise at hand. | Whitney Museum retrospective on Kara Walker. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 55
  • 56. and finally... Out of all the museum mobile experiences you havetaken in the past 12 months, which is your favorite?!No mobile, and no plans to. (A selection) "(N/A Im one of those people who doesnt do tours when Im a visitor!) | curators tour at DeYoung Museum |Desert Museum in Phoenix, AZ. Enjoyed the descriptions and information of the various plants. | first timeexperience | Gallery specific/initiated audio guides. | have not had any museum mobile experiences | Have nothad one in past 12 months. | Have not had one. | I dont think I have taken any. Or if I have, it obviously wasntmemorable. ( I dont have a "smart" phone, just an old fashioned cell phone that calls and takes messages. Noteven a camera. My museum pays for it.) | I dont think Ive had any museum mobile experiences, quite frankly.Most of the museums in my neck of the woods (CT) havent developed mobile apps. Theyre on facebook andtwitter, but thats about it. | I have not attended a mobile experience in the past 24 months | I have not done inpast 12 months | I have not experienced any. | I have not used a museum moblie experience. | I havent used anymobile experiences in a museum ever. Usually I have looked around with printed maps (or just wandered). In a fewcases I have used a human tour guide or the like. | I really liked the phone app for the City Hall Park exhibit of SolLeWitt sculpture. | I recently downloaded three Civil War Trust apps for the iPhone (Gettysburg Battle App,Fredericksburg Battle App, and Bull Run Battle App), mostly out of curiosity. Although not exactly museum-specific, Ifound them to be informative even though I have not visited any of those sites. However, I havent recently downloadmany museum-related apps. | Indiana Historical Society Interesting interactives and connections with people. | n/a| NA | none taken | SFMOMA Podcasts | St. Augustine FL Lighthouse | The Summer Palace Beijing had amobile tour which was geo location based. It took the burden off the user to key in numbers or stops. | To beperfectly honest, I have never had a museum mobile experience. Despite being 31 - an age that readily accepts newtechnological innovations and experiences - I very much dislike them. I find the idea/experience of being plugged invery lonely despite the obvious arguments otherwise. My attention span is too short to support it and I find that I geta better personal experience (as well as personally interesting, learning more, making better connections, etc.) if I amable to follow my own initiative and see the museum as I am interested in it. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 56
  • 57. and finally... Out of all the museum mobile experiences you havetaken in the past 12 months, which is your favorite?!Vendors & Researchers. (A selection) "Catellan-Guggenheim. Liked the visual trigger for ascertaining more info. | Diego Rivera iPad app at the DetroitInstitute of Arts. It is the perfect way to provide interpretation for a confined and unusual exhibit. The usability anddesign of the interactive made it a pleasant and engaging experience. | Dinosaurs! | | Have not had such anexperience in past 12 months. | Have not had that experience -- still have a "dumb phone"! | Have not taken any in12months. | Havent really seen any interactive truly mobile experiences here. | honestly cant pull one outspecifically right nowl... | I really dont know... Maybe Museum of Londons Streetmuseum app? because it islocation based and links the past to the present and makes it relevant for the viewer?? | Just Add Art! One of thesimplest, yet coolest, educational experiences Ive ever seen in this market. | LEAFSNAP. It uses the technicalpowers of the mobile devices to create a new experience, different from that of the museum visit. It finds a way toconnect the public with the content in an exciting and pleasing way. Besides it is beautifully designed. | None. Ihavent come across something that would be more then typing and listening. | Prototype Macbeth the Kingtransmedia service taking people into the landscape and ending in a museum visit | QR codes at Fundacion JoanMiro (Barcelona) linked to wikipedia articles, done by the community and check by the museum curators |Smithsonian African Art Museum, Artists in Dialogue. | Smithsonian is the only one I have had contact recently. Theyare sometimes dificult to locate the specific research item but they have great people in the system that get back toyou with suggestions if not the actual information you are looking for. | The AMNHs integration of scanning of on-site QR codes/images with their exhibit on space exploration was an absolute delight for people of all ages. Theexecution was brilliant because the collecting of all of the images results in a "reward" which must be collected backat ones own computer. | The Andy Warhol Museum has really been on the cutting edge of aps that not only takeplace within the museum, but continue to connect the museum and its mission outside the walls of the museum.Theyve done a fantastic job of keeping the content relevant to their audiences (which are a tough one to crack--generally young and generally very tech savvy. They can smell a bad tech experience a mile away!) Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 57
  • 58. Glad you continue to do this survey; great benchmarking tool! Thank you! | I liked the design of the survey! Speciallythe banners and how readable was the text (I have a little impaired vision). | Id suggest you start the next surveywith a brief description of what you mean by "mobile". Lots of people are using it to describe different types of tours,apps, audio tours, ipods, tablets etc while other consider it to only be smartphone tours. Im not sure how wide of adefinition you intended. | In the future, I think it would be a good idea to structure this assuming that institutionshave more than one mobile offering. Id include questions about tablets as well. | In your survey, the choices were"Very challenging," "Quite challenging." and not challenging. Truthfully, "very and "quite" are similar modifiers, andmeant the same thing to me. I would have liked to see "somewhat challenging" as the middle choice - as it coversmore middle ground than "quite challenging." Just a suggestion. | Part of this survey did not cover our situation.We have no full-time employees - every curator, technician and support staff member is a volunteer. | Please giveme feedback on the results of your survey. | Survey was too speculative. | Thanks for including me in this survey. |Thanks for your work! | Thanks you for your continued work on this survey and contributions to the world ofmuseums. | The survey presupposes more knowledge than we have on the topic. I found answering the questionswas not entirely simple | This is an incredibly useful annual initiative. Thank you. | Very useful and timely research!Excited to see the results. | Very useful survey. Well-placed questions; not too long, etc. | We had fun participatingin the conference this year. Looking forward to it growing. | Would be interesting to know what platforms culturalorganisations are supporting in smartphone and tablet apps: is the bias towards iOS really disappearing? Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 58
  • 59. Hashtag: #mmonlineEmail: loic@pocket-proof.com Please cite paper as: Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile in 2012: An analysis of the Museums & Mobile Survey 2012 Responses. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes), published at http://www.museums-mobile.org/surveyABOUT POCKET-PROOF ABOUT LEARNING TIMES Pocket-Proof is a leading knowledge center / thought leader in LearningTimes is a global leader in creating innovative,mobile experiences for museums. Pocket-Proof assists interactive online learning programs. LearningTimes producesmuseums internationally in the planning, design and live online conferences, webcasts, podcasts, and educationaldevelopment of experiences that meet the needs and programs for more than 400 organizations and associations inpreferences of their visitors through new mobile technologies. the technology, publishing, museum, library, K-20 education,Clients include MFA Boston, Whitney Museum of American government, training and non-profit sectors. LearningTimes isArt, National Museums Scotland, National Museum Wales, headquartered in New York with offices in San Francisco,Louis Vuitton Cultural Centre & National Museum of Qatar. London, Calgary and Philadelphia. Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 59
  • 60. SAVE THE DATE // May 9, 2012On May 9, 2012, join museum colleagues from around the world for Museums & Mobile IV Online ConferenceSpeakers include:•  Charlotte Sexton, Head of New Media, National Gallery, UK.•  David Klevan, Senior Digital Engagement Strategist, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, USA.•  Elizabeth Margulies, Assistant Director, Family Programs, MOMA, USA.•  Charlie Keitch, Formal Learning Officer, National Maritime Museum, UK.•  Jane Findlay, Digital Participation Officer, National Maritime Museum, UK.•  Sheila McGuire, Manager of Learning Resources, Minneapolis Institute of the Arts, USA.•  Richard C. Cooper, Manager of Interpretive Services, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, USA.•  Shelley Mannion, Digital Learning Programs Manager, The British Museum, UK.•  Dan Davis, Multimedia Producer, National Museum of the American Indian, USA.•  Eric Longo, Longo Consulting, USA.•  Nancy Proctor, Head of Mobile Strategy, Smithsonian Institute, USA.And remember, it all takes place online so you can attend from the comfort of your own desk. No travel necessary!Register Today! (early bird pricing ends April 25th): http://www.museums-mobile.org Tallon, Loïc. Museums & Mobile Survey 2012. (February 2012: Pocket-Proof & LearningTimes). 60