LSS@SMW:  Bernie Hogan Rebuilding The Collapsed Contexts In Social Media
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LSS@SMW: Bernie Hogan Rebuilding The Collapsed Contexts In Social Media

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As part of the LSS@Social Media Week event, Dr. Bernie Hogan took the opportunity to explore what science can show us about Social Networks

As part of the LSS@Social Media Week event, Dr. Bernie Hogan took the opportunity to explore what science can show us about Social Networks

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LSS@SMW: Bernie Hogan Rebuilding The Collapsed Contexts In Social Media Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Rebuilding the Collapsed Contexts in Social Media Bernie Hogan, PhD Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute University of Oxford Local Social @ Social Media Week, February 4, 2010 Saturday, February 6, 2010 1
  • 2. The particular case of a peculiar age Person-to-person networking does not undermine distance. But it makes distance secondary to specific social relationships. Each individual has their own unique relationships. Like a thumbprint. We live in an age of access. To be local is to be accessible. Saturday, February 6, 2010 2
  • 3. The paradox of convenience Everyone is somewhere, no one is everywhere Saturday, February 6, 2010 3
  • 4. Because you can never have too many irrelevant friends Saturday, February 6, 2010 4
  • 5. A social utility? Source: http://www.alexa.com/topsites Saturday, February 6, 2010 5
  • 6. Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/28/Facebook2007.jpg Saturday, February 6, 2010 6
  • 7. What is Facebook? Really? Saturday, February 6, 2010 7
  • 8. Saturday, February 6, 2010 8
  • 9. Saturday, February 6, 2010 9
  • 10. Saturday, February 6, 2010 10
  • 11. Reasons for friends on SNS 1. Actual friends 2. Acquaintances, family members, colleagues 3. It would be socially inappropriate to say no because you know them 4. Having lots of Friends makes you look popular 5. It’s a way of indicating that you are a fan (of that person, band, etc.) 6. Your list of Friends reveals who you are 7. Their Profile is cool so being Friends makes you look cool 8. Collecting Friends lets you see more people (Friendster) 9. It’s the only way to see a private Profile (MySpace) 10. Being Friends lets you see someone’s bulletins and their Friends-only blog posts (MySpace) 11. You want them to see your bulletins, private Profile, private blog (MySpace) 12. You can use your Friends list to find someone later 13. It’s easier to say yes than no. 11 Saturday, February 6, 2010 11
  • 12. The friend numbers game •Large university in the American Midwest. •First year social statistics class (2009) •95% Response Rate •Data captured through Facebook API •N = 393. Saturday, February 6, 2010 12
  • 13. Too Many Friends! Saturday, February 6, 2010 13
  • 14. And too many connections Saturday, February 6, 2010 14
  • 15. But again, scale matters. Men with 500 friends only have mutual conversations with 10 of them. Its up to 16 for women. That’s less than 4% of friends. Source: Economist (via Overstated.net) Saturday, February 6, 2010 15
  • 16. ocial Network Analysis to the Rescue! Saturday, February 6, 2010 16
  • 17. Trace data can tell a lot Source: Predicting tie strength with social media. Eric Gilbert, Karrie Karahalios and Christian Sandvig. CHI ’09 Saturday, February 6, 2010 17
  • 18. Friend lists Tedious and incoherent Saturday, February 6, 2010 18
  • 19. Eigenvector Community Well partitioned, but overwhelming Saturday, February 6, 2010 19
  • 20. Greedy Community Large swaths of Sense Saturday, February 6, 2010 20
  • 21. High School Professional Friends (24%) Colleagues (23%) Single event friends (3%) Current Co-workers (13.4%) Friends from Undergraduate (15%) Summer Camp Friends (2%) Family (8%) Grad School Colleagues and Friends (12%) Intern friends (3%) Saturday, February 6, 2010 21
  • 22. Network as Context in Email Source: Hansen, D. (forthcoming) Analyzing Social Media with NodeXL, chapter 8. Saturday, February 6, 2010 22
  • 23. Network as context in Twitter Source: Smith, M. (forthcoming) Analyzing Social Media with NodeXL, chapter 4. Saturday, February 6, 2010 23
  • 24. Networks in Twitter II Saturday, February 6, 2010 24
  • 25. So what? • Lurking within any social network site profile is a host of clustered peers. Discovering these groups through community detection is an effective way to bring coherence to a profile, and help it scale. • Consider: planning a party, recommending a concert, sending out important news. Saturday, February 6, 2010 25
  • 26. Nearness is now a social property as much as a spatial one. This is not the same thing as collaborative filtering. Networks do not signify similarity, they signify community. These are the people that do things together, disclose information to each other. Saturday, February 6, 2010 26
  • 27. Looking forward Particular relationships create networks. Norms of access create overload. Thinking local is one solution, but it is partial. We need to create contexts, so users don’t have to. Saturday, February 6, 2010 27
  • 28. Thank You Bernie Hogan Research Fellow, OII ;) @blurky bernie.hogan@oii.ox.ac.uk Saturday, February 6, 2010 28