Cities and the Maker Movement
Thomas Kalil
Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation
White House Office of Science and...
Overview
• The White House will hold the first ever White House Maker Faire
(date TBD, likely mid-June).
• The Obama Admin...
President Obama on the White House
Maker Faire
“We cannot wait to see more of that innovative spirit later this year
when ...
Congressional Maker Caucus
• A bipartisan group of legislators aimed at promoting American
manufacturing and entrepreneurs...
What’s New
Individuals self-identifying as Makers, participating in
grassroots/community activities like Maker Faires
What’s New
Democratization of tools needed to design and make just about
anything (declining cost/ease of use)
What’s New
Shared access to non-profit and commercial makerspaces, Fab Labs,
TechShops, etc.
What’s New
Embrace of Making by many institutions (e.g. large companies,
government agencies, mayors, labor unions, univer...
What’s New
Use of Internet to share blueprints and instructions, create
communities like DIY Drones
What’s New
Crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and IndieGoGo, equity-based
crowdfunding enabled by JOBS Act
What’s New
Leverages other business concepts like Open Innovation, Lean Startup,
Rise of the Rest (innovation hubs outside...
What’s New
Factories/Models for Makers to scale-up in US (e.g. Factorli in Las
Vegas, SFMade in San Francisco)
Why is the Maker Movement Important?
• Promotes values and dispositions that are worthwhile in their own
right, such as se...
What Are Cities Doing?
Celebrating the ingenuity and creativity of local Makers by hosting Mini
Maker Faires
What Are Cities Doing?
Helping to identify locations within the community where makerspaces
can be established to broaden ...
What Are Cities Doing?
Convening summits with key stakeholders that serve as catalysts for
public and private commitments ...
What Are Cities Doing?
Encouraging entrepreneurship and job creation related to Making and
advanced manufacturing by suppo...
What Are Cities Doing?
Supporting initiatives that engage women and under-served
communities in Making
What Are Cities Doing?
Participating in efforts to identify and share “promising practices” so
that we can all learn from ...
What Are Cities Doing?
Encouraging schools to integrate making into their STEM curriculum
in unique ways
Possible Next Steps:
• Increase number of communities with vibrant Maker ecosystems to at
least 100, consider signing lett...
Possible Next Steps:
• Consider creating coalition to increase the number of organizations
involved in Making at national ...
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Cities and the Maker Movement

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The Congressional Maker Caucus is a bipartisan group of legislators aimed at promoting American manufacturing and entrepreneurship by giving congressional support to new technologies that revolutionize manufacturing and help eliminate barriers to entrepreneurship.

The White House will hold the first ever White House Maker Faire (date TBD). The Obama Administration believes that the Maker Movement has the potential to advance several national goals, including STEM education/workforce development, and entrepreneurship/job creation.

Many cities are already playing an important role, the White House is interested in highlighting new/expanded commitments and a “sign on” letter.

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Cities and the Maker Movement

  1. 1. Cities and the Maker Movement Thomas Kalil Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation White House Office of Science and Technology Policy & National Economic Council tkalil@ostp.eop.gov
  2. 2. Overview • The White House will hold the first ever White House Maker Faire (date TBD, likely mid-June). • The Obama Administration believes that the Maker Movement has the potential to advance several national goals, including STEM education/workforce development, and entrepreneurship/job creation. • Many cities are already playing an important role, the White House is interested in highlighting new/expanded commitments and a “sign on” letter. • Contact us at maker@ostp.gov if you’d like to get involved.
  3. 3. President Obama on the White House Maker Faire “We cannot wait to see more of that innovative spirit later this year when we host our first ever White House Maker Faire. We already have a White House Science Fair. This new event is going to highlight how Americans young and old -— tinkerers and inventors —- are imagining and designing and building tools and machines that will open our minds and power our economy.” (remarks at the White House Student Film Festival, Feb. 28, 2014)
  4. 4. Congressional Maker Caucus • A bipartisan group of legislators aimed at promoting American manufacturing and entrepreneurship by giving congressional support to new technologies that revolutionize manufacturing and help eliminate barriers to entrepreneurship. • Co-founded by Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), Mark Takano (D-Calif.) and Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.). “Technologies like desktop 3D printers, CNC machines and consumer- grade laser cutting machines can help forge new product lines and create opportunities in niche manufacturing markets.” -Congressional Maker Caucus
  5. 5. What’s New Individuals self-identifying as Makers, participating in grassroots/community activities like Maker Faires
  6. 6. What’s New Democratization of tools needed to design and make just about anything (declining cost/ease of use)
  7. 7. What’s New Shared access to non-profit and commercial makerspaces, Fab Labs, TechShops, etc.
  8. 8. What’s New Embrace of Making by many institutions (e.g. large companies, government agencies, mayors, labor unions, universities, libraries, museums, schools, manufacturing/hardware accelerators, non-profits)
  9. 9. What’s New Use of Internet to share blueprints and instructions, create communities like DIY Drones
  10. 10. What’s New Crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and IndieGoGo, equity-based crowdfunding enabled by JOBS Act
  11. 11. What’s New Leverages other business concepts like Open Innovation, Lean Startup, Rise of the Rest (innovation hubs outside of Silicon Valley and Cambridge, MA)
  12. 12. What’s New Factories/Models for Makers to scale-up in US (e.g. Factorli in Las Vegas, SFMade in San Francisco)
  13. 13. Why is the Maker Movement Important? • Promotes values and dispositions that are worthwhile in their own right, such as self-efficacy, collaboration, tinkering, curiosity, and imagination. • Inspires more young boys and girls to excel in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) subjects. • Upgrades the skills of our workforce so that America can compete in what some are calling the “Third Industrial Revolution” – digital manufacturing. • Encourages innovation, entrepreneurship and job creation in manufacturing by lowering the cost of designing and manufacturing new products.
  14. 14. What Are Cities Doing? Celebrating the ingenuity and creativity of local Makers by hosting Mini Maker Faires
  15. 15. What Are Cities Doing? Helping to identify locations within the community where makerspaces can be established to broaden access to tools need for design, prototyping and manufacturing
  16. 16. What Are Cities Doing? Convening summits with key stakeholders that serve as catalysts for public and private commitments that will strengthen the local Maker “ecosystem”
  17. 17. What Are Cities Doing? Encouraging entrepreneurship and job creation related to Making and advanced manufacturing by supporting accelerators, design/production districts, changes in zoning policy, and worker training for 21st century manufacturing
  18. 18. What Are Cities Doing? Supporting initiatives that engage women and under-served communities in Making
  19. 19. What Are Cities Doing? Participating in efforts to identify and share “promising practices” so that we can all learn from local experimentation
  20. 20. What Are Cities Doing? Encouraging schools to integrate making into their STEM curriculum in unique ways
  21. 21. Possible Next Steps: • Increase number of communities with vibrant Maker ecosystems to at least 100, consider signing letter on Making as a first step. • Roles for Mayors/cities: –Celebrate Makers by participating in Maker Faires –Find space for makerspaces, TechShops, FabLabs –Convene local/regional summits that serve at catalysts for commitments –Encourage entrepreneurship/job creation by supporting innovation/production districts, changes in zoning policy, workforce development –Support initiatives that engage women and under-represented minorities in Making
  22. 22. Possible Next Steps: • Consider creating coalition to increase the number of organizations involved in Making at national and regional/local level, document/share promising practices. • Scale-up programs like Maker Education Initiative to reach hundreds of thousands of students/year • Your idea here • Contact us at maker@ostp.gov to get involved.
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