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NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
NTFS - Summary Report
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NTFS - Summary Report

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National Teen Food Survey

National Teen Food Survey

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  • 1. NATIONAL TEEN FOOD SURVEY Irish Universities Nutrition Alliance Summary Report
  • 2. INTRODUCTION
  • 3. This summary report describes the methods used and the main findings with regard to food and beverage consumption, nutrient intakes and anthropometric, physical activity and attitudinal data from the National Teen Food Consumption Survey (NTFS). This survey investigated habitual food and beverage consumption, physical activity, health & lifestyle characteristics and factors influencing food choice in a representative sample of 13-17 year olds (n=441) in the Republic of Ireland. The extensive electronic database which has been compiled from this survey has been collated with data from the National Children’s Food Consumption Survey (NCFS) of 5-12 year olds (n=594) and is one of the most comprehensive of its type in Europe providing the Irish food industry, regulatory authorities and policy makers with a state of the art database for estimating intakes of foods, nutrients and food chemicals in 5-17 year olds. It represents a very valuable resource which has many applications including product development and promotion as well as for the development and implementation of National and EU policy.
  • 4. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE SURVEY 1. To establish in a representative sample of teenagers aged 13 to 17 years on the Republic of Ireland a database of: habitual food and beverage consumption height, weight, waist & hip circumferences health and lifestyle characteristics factors influencing food choice socio-demographic characteristics 2. To apply this database to investigate: food and nutrient intakes in relation to nutritional adequacy and excess and compliance with current dietary guidelines body weight, habitual physical activity levels, lifestyle and socio-demographic characteristics, and attitudes in relation to food and health In addition the survey design and the database structure were selected with a view to facilitate its use for a number of other key purposes, including: risk assessment for exposure to chemical and biological hazards in the food supply the development of quantitative and qualitative food based dietary guidelines for healthy eating estimation of current nutrient intakes, and modeling of potential future nutrient intakes from fortified foods and nutritional supplements to provide scientific data to underpin food product development and promotion
  • 5. SAMPLING AND RECRUITMENT PROCEDURES & METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION
  • 6. SAMPLING AND RECRUITMENT PROCEDURES A sample of 441 teenagers aged 13-17 years (224 males, 217 females) were selected from 32 secondary schools throughout the Republic of Ireland. Schools were selected from a database of secondary schools available from the Department of Education and Science. All schools in this database (n=722) were classified into secondary (56%), vocational (31%) or comprehensive/community schools (13%). Schools were further classified according to gender served (‘all boys’, ‘all girls’ or ‘mixed’), whether disadvantaged or not disadvantaged and location (urban or rural). A number of schools were randomly selected from each category. An introductory letter and information about the survey was posted to the principal of each selected school. This was followed up by a phone call from the coordinating nutritionist in each centre. Over 95% of schools selected agreed to participate in the survey. The school principal was given information packs to give to all students to bring home to their parents/guardians. Information packs contained an introductory letter, an information brochure and a reply slip. If the parent/guardian and the selected teenager were interested in finding out more about participating in the survey they were instructed to fill out their contact details on the reply slip and return it to the school and a visit from one of the researchers was arranged. METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION Food intake was determined using a 7-day semi-weighed food record. The respondent kept a diary of everything he/she ate and drank over a one-week period, recording the time, location, cooking method and quantity of each item of food and drink consumed. To ensure that the level of detail and accuracy of recording was kept at a consistently high level, a researcher visited the respondent in their home four times during the recording week. A comprehensive quantification protocol, which included a combination of food quantification methods, was used to obtain the best estimates of food and drink consumed. Each respondent was given a food scales and asked to weigh foods that they commonly consumed during the week. A specially designed photographic food atlas was
  • 7. used to assign weights to other foods. Respondents were encouraged to keep food packaging to allow improved accuracy of the food and portion descriptions. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect information on parental employment and education, social and demographic variables, lifestyle factors, habitual physical activity levels, factors influencing food choice, supplement use and dieting habits. The researcher carried out body measurements, including height, weight and waist and hip circumferences. Fieldwork was carried out from September 2005 to September 2006. Data collection was seasonally balanced. The data were compiled into a fully integrated relational database, meaning that each piece of data collected for each respondent is linked to that respondent’s ID number. Quality control procedures were implemented throughout the collection, processing and compilation of data.
  • 8. FOOD CONSUMPTION
  • 9. Mean and SD of food group intakes (g/day) in the total sample, percentage consumers of food groups and mean and SD of food group intakes (g/day) in consumers only Population ( n= 4 4 1 ) Consumers only Mean SD % consumers Mean SD 1 Rice & Pasta, Flours, Grains & Starches 39 61 64 61 67 2 Savouries 47 51 76 62 50 3 White Breads & Rolls 63 43 96 66 42 4 Wholemeal & Brown Breads & Rolls 20 39 48 41 48 5 Other Breads 9 16 41 41 23 6 ‘Ready to Eat’ Breakfast Cereals 31 32 81 38 32 7 Other Breakfast Cereals 16 56 15 110 106 8 Biscuits 12 17 69 17 18 9 Cakes, Pastries & Buns 12 22 48 25 27 10 Wholemilk 206 232 82 253 232 11 Low fat, Skimmed & fortified foods 42 122 24 176 197 12 Other milks 9 33 12 79 61 13 Creams 1 2 11 5 4 14 Cheeses 11 17 62 18 18 15 Yoghurts 22 36 43 51 39 16 Icecreams 10 17 48 22 19 17 Puddings & Chilled Desserts 9 23 31 31 34 18 Milk Puddings 2 9 5 29 25 19 Eggs & Egg dishes 8 14 41 20 16 20 Butter 2 7 26 9 12 21 Low Fat Spreads 2 6 25 9 10 22 Other Spreading Fats 7 11 68 10 11 23 Oils 0 0 6 1 1 24 Hard Cooking Fats 0 0 0 0 0 25 Potatoes 70 63 83 84 60 26 Processed & Homemade Potato Products 7 16 24 27 23 27 Chipped, Fried & Roasted Potatoes 62 50 93 67 49 28 Vegetable & Pulse Dishes 7 18 26 26 28 29 Peas, beans & Lentils 16 23 55 29 24 30 Green Vegetables 8 13 41 19 14 31 Carrots 10 14 51 19 15
  • 10. Mean SD % consumers Mean SD 32 Salad Vegetables 7 14 44 17 17 33 Other Vegetables 13 22 56 23 25 34 Tinned or Jarred Vegetables 1 3 8 10 7 35 Fruit Juices 86 116 62 140 120 36 Bananas 17 39 34 52 52 37 Other Fruits 36 78 56 64 94 38 Citrus Fruit 8 27 18 47 47 39 Tinned Fruit 1 7 6 17 23 40 Nuts, Seeds, Herbs & Spices 1 4 16 6 9 41 Fish & Fish products 9 15 37 23 17 42 Fish Dishes 2 11 3 48 41 43 Bacon & Ham 13 16 66 19 16 44 Beef & Veal 11 18 41 27 20 45 Lamb 3 11 15 22 18 46 Pork 5 10 24 21 12 47 Chicken, Turkey & game 25 28 71 35 27 48 Offal & Offal Dishes 0 0 0 0 0 49 Beef & Veal Dishes 30 44 52 57 46 50 Lamb, Pork, Bacon Dishes 4 17 10 43 32 51 Poultry & Game Dishes 19 31 36 52 31 52 Burgers ( Beef & Pork) 13 20 45 29 20 53 Sausages 10 13 57 17 13 54 Meat Pie & pastries 5 16 16 30 28 55 Meat Products 28 50 76 37 54 56 Alcoholic Beverages 9 71 5 172 278 57 Sugars, Syrups, Preserves & Sweeteners 8 12 66 12 14 58 Chocolate Confectionary 21 20 84 25 20 59 Non-chocolate Confectionary 11 18 66 17 19 60 Savoury snacks 13 14 75 17 14 61 Soups, Sauces & Miscellaneous Foods 43 45 91 47 45 63 Teas 110 189 54 203 218 64 Coffees 7 33 8 86 79 65 Other Beverages 418 388 92 455 384 66 Carbonated Beverages 185 189 82 225 186 67 Diet Carbonated Beverages 21 65 18 121 108 68 Squashes, Cordials & Fruit Juice Drinks 34 66 45 76 80
  • 11. During the course of the survey, respondents recorded 1761 individual food items into the 7-day food diary. Each food was allocated to one of 68 food groups. The above tables summarise some of the data from the report on the average food group intakes in the total population and in consumers only. Commonly consumed foods Analysis still in progress
  • 12. NUTRIENT INTAKES
  • 13. Mean daily energy and macronutrient intakes and the % of energy from macronutrients of males and females are presented below. Males had higher intakes of energy and all macronutrients than females. Among both sexes, energy intakes were higher in 15-17 year olds than 13-14 year olds. Mean and SD of energy and macronutrients and the % of energy from macronutrients in males and females aged 13 to 17 years Total Population Males Females (n=441) (n=224) (n=217) Mean SD Mean SD Mean SD Energy (MJ) 8.3 2.4 9.5 2.4 7.1 1.9 Protein (g) 73.1 24.9 85.5 24.2 60.3 18.2 % Energy 14.8 2.6 15.2 2.5 14.3 2.6 Fat (g) 78.7 26.8 89.1 26.8 68.0 22.0 % Energy 35.6 5.0 35.4 5.2 35.8 4.8 CHO (g) 257.8 78.2 292.6 79.8 222.0 57.8 % Energy 49.0 5.1 48.7 5.4 49.3 4.8 Mean daily % Energy from macronutrients Over half (females: 57%, Protein 15% males: 54%) of teenagers surveyed did not meet the Carbohydrate recommendation for fat of 49% total fat intake ≤ 35% Fat 36% energy (Institute of Medicine 2002)
  • 14. Percentage contribution of food groups to energy Five food groups contributed Meat & meat 59% of energy intake in the Other products 18% 16% population overall, i.e. meat and Beverages 5% meat products (16%), breads Bread & rolls Biscuits, cakes & pastries 12% (12%), sugars, preserves, 5% Breakfast cereals Sugars, confectionery and savoury snacks 6% confectionery, preserves & (12%), potatoes and potato savouries Grains, rice, 12% pasta & products (10%) and milk and savouries 7% Milk & yoghurt Potatoes & yoghurt (9%), shown above. 9% potato products 10% Percentage contribution of food groups to fat The four main sources of fat in the diet were meat and meat Other Meat & meat products products (22%), sugars, 22% 22% preserves, confectionery and savoury snacks (13%), milk and Grains, rice, pasta Sugars, & savouries confectionery, yoghurt (12%) and butter, 6% preserves & Biscuits, cakes savouries spreading fats and oils (9%), & pastries 13% 6% contributing between them Potatoes & Milk & yoghurt potato products 12% 56% of the fat content of the 10% Butter, spreading fats diet. & oils 9%
  • 15. Percentage contribution of food groups to carbohydrate The four main sources of carbohydrate in the diet were Bread & rolls 18% breads (18%), sugars, Other 28% preserves, confectionery and Sugars, confectionery, savoury snacks (13%), preserves & savouries 13% potatoes and potato products Grains, rice, pasta & savouries 9% (13%) and breakfast cereals Potatoes & potato products 13% (10%), contributing 54% of Beverages 9% Breakfast cereals the total carbohydrate intake. 10% Percentage contribution of food groups to protein Sixty four percent of the Other protein content of the diet was 24% Meat & meat products provided by three food groups, 40% Potatoes & meat and meat products potato products 5% (40%), milk and yoghurt Grains, rice, pasta & (12%) and breads (12%). savouries 7% Bread & rolls 12% Milk & yoghurt 12%
  • 16. Mean and SD of daily intakes of micronutrients in the total population and for males and females aged 13 to 17 years Total Population Males Females (n=441) (n=224) (n=217) Mean SD Mean SD Mean SD Vitamins Retinol (μg) 363 295 416 315 308 262 Carotene (μg) 2593 2393 2909 2751 2267 1909 Total Vitamin A (μg) 795 539 901 601 686 441 Vitamin D (μg) 2.7 2.4 3.0 2.6 2.3 2.2 Vitamin E (mg) 8.7 8.2 9.3 6.4 8.0 9.7 Thiamin (mg) 2.1 2.8 2.2 2.4 1.9 3.2 Riboflavin (mg) 2.3 2.8 2.6 2.5 2.0 3.1 Pre-formed Niacin (mg) 22.6 10.5 26.5 11.0 18.7 8.3 Total Niacin Equivalents (mg) 37.0 14.4 43.3 14.6 30.5 10.8 Vitamin B6 (mg) 2.8 2.8 3.1 2.5 2.5 3.1 Vitamin B12 (μg) 5.1 3.3 6.0 3.2 4.2 3.1 Folate (μg) 276 150 320 157 230 129 Biotin (μg) 32.0 37.9 37.9 38.6 25.9 36.2 Pantothenate (mg) 6.3 4.2 7.3 4.1 5.2 4.0 Vitamin C (mg) 95 94 98 87 92 100 Minerals Calcium (mg) 906 406 1070 409 738 328 Magnesium (mg) 234 87 271 92 196 62 Phosphorous (mg) 1210 436 1413 430 1000 331 Iron (mg) 12.4 11.7 14.1 11.5 10.7 11.6 Copper (mg) 1.0 0.5 1.2 0.6 0.8 0.4 Zinc (mg) 8.7 3.7 10.2 3.7 7.2 3.1

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