Social Storytelling WorkbookThe Next Wave of EngagementPresented by Mark Williams and Carri BugbeeSXSW March 11, 2013
Document Title                                                                   Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWOR...
Document Title                                                       Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldSocial Story Ch...
Document Title                                               Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet #1: Crafting ...
Document Title                                                    Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 2: Devel...
Document Title                                               Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorld5. Tactical Objectives ...
Document Title                                               Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 3: Customers ...
Document Title                                               Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldDetailed Character Desc...
Document Title                                                Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 4: Finding Y...
Document Title                                                  Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 5: Content...
Document Title                                                       Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorld2. Brand Events...
Document Title                                             Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldAnnual Event Calendar At-...
Document Title                                                   Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 6: Start ...
Document Title                                                   Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorld       FLOW with th...
Document Title                                                  Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 7: Social ...
Document Title                               Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldStory Engagement Frequency:Best Practic...
Document Title                           Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldStory Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:8...
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Social Storytelling: The Next Wave of Engagement

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Most of today’s content strategies involve publishing hundred of bits of content per month across social networks, without any cohesive story or narrative behind the content. These random pieces of information tell a story to your fans and customers, whether intended or not.

Are you telling the right brand story? This hands-on session will help you:

· Identify the genre or type of story that you want to tell
· Develop a monthly story arc in your content calendar
· Create compelling, interesting characters your customers will want to engage
· Invite your customers to be in your story
· Frame your story within the Facebook Timeline layout

Presented by Liveworld at SXSW Interactive 2013 by Mark Williams and Carri Bugbee

Published in: Business

Social Storytelling: The Next Wave of Engagement

  1. 1. Social Storytelling WorkbookThe Next Wave of EngagementPresented by Mark Williams and Carri BugbeeSXSW March 11, 2013
  2. 2. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWORKBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTSWORKBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................................... 2SOCIAL STORY CHECKLIST................................................................................. 3WORKSHEET #1: CRAFTING YOUR BRAND STORY ......................................... 4WORKSHEET 2: DEVELOPING BUSINESS OBJECTIVES .................................. 5WORKSHEET 3: CUSTOMERS AS CHARACTERS ............................................. 7 Main Character/Primary Customer(s) .................................................................................... 7 Detailed Character Description Worksheet........................................................................... 8WORKSHEET 4: FINDING YOUR BRAND TONE & VOICE.................................. 9 Personifying the Brand – Social Media is a Party. ............................................................... 9WORKSHEET 5: CONTENT CALENDAR AS STORY ARC ................................ 10 Seasonal, Sales and Life Events .......................................................................................... 10 Annual Event Calendar At-A-Glance ................................................................................... 12WORKSHEET 6: START THE STORY AND KEEP IT GOING ............................ 13 Story Starters and Rules for Scripted Improv .................................................................... 13WORKSHEET 7: SOCIAL CHANNELS AS GENRES .......................................... 15 Page 2
  3. 3. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldSocial Story Checklist o Who is the main character that we can identify with? 1. Is the character real, fictional, or a customer profile? 2. Why will we identify with him or her? (Inspire, Aspire, Entertain, Inform) o Context for the story: Place, Time Restrictions, and Relationships 1. Where does the story happen and what time restrictions spur action? 2. Brand to customer? Peer to peer? Customer to product? Customer to lifestyle? o Challenge to Overcome: o How does the story end? o Who is the intended audience? o How are you going to encourage interaction? (Channels/media) o Why will people interact? (Express themselves, Make friends, Gain attention, Status): o What is your response plan? (How often will you respond to different prompts?) o What are we (the brand) giving that is of value? (What does the audience get out this?) o Why will people share this? (Express themselves, Make friends, Gain attention, Status) Page 3
  4. 4. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet #1: Crafting Your Brand Story 1. What are your strategic objectives? (Branding, Transaction, Engagement, Education, Rebranding) 2. How will you use social to fulfill the objectives? (Express, Connect, Attention, Status) 3. How will you measure success? (KPIs) 4. Whose voice tells the story? (POV: Customer, Brand, Blend of both, 3rd person) 5. Describe the characters in your brand story. Who is the star and who plays supporting roles? (Customer/Brand profiles) 6. What problem does your brand solve for your customers? (Character objectives) Am I special? Am I Good or Bad? Am I Beautiful? Smart? Safe? In control of Life? 7. What challenges to their needs and wants do your customers face? (Character obstacles) 8. Which social channel(s) will you use to tell and amplify your story – and why? (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, etc.) 9. How does the story begin and how will you keep it going? (How frequently will you update?) 10. How does the story end? Page 4
  5. 5. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 2: Developing Business Objectives1. Business Objectives (Rank each by % of priority of attention.) • Brand Awareness ____________ • Transaction (sales, registrations, promo codes, etc.) ____________ • Engagement (customer feedback, ideation):__________ • Education (downloads, product info): _____________ • Re-branding (re-brand, alternative uses of product): _______________2. Objectives KPIs - How will you know your effect on the audience? Pick 2-3 KPIs for each strategic objective and your target: (Story analogy: Plan for laughs, chuckles, gasps, ahhhs, etc.)Objective KPI #1 Goal KPI #2 Goal KPI #3 Goal Brand Awareness TransactionEngagement Education Re-branding3. Business Strategies - How do you hope to achieve selling more product, earning more market share, share of voice, etc. Goals can be broad or very specific. 1. Objective (sample): Increase market share among single females 18 – 34 2. Objective (sample): Increase share of Hispanic market 3. Objective (sample): Be most authentic brand in our industry4. Business Objective KPIs - How will you know when you have reached your objectives? Pick 2-3 KPIs for each business objective and your target. Objective KPI #1 Goal KPI #2 Goal KPI #3 Goal Increase Increase Increase Positive mention Engagement engagement sales to market share Share of voice by 3-4 key Sales revenue rates from 8% to group women 18-24 influencers 12% on FB by 5% Page 5
  6. 6. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorld5. Tactical Objectives – What will you do to support your business objectives, and how willthey benefit your customer? (Check against your customer profiles, and their wants and needs.)Objective #1 Tactical/Creative Brainstorm (Increase market share among 18-24 female)Idea 1:Customer benefit:Idea 2:Customer benefit:Objective #2 Tactical BrainstormIdea 1:Customer benefit:Idea 2:Customer benefit:Objective #3 Tactical BrainstormIdea 1:Customer benefit:Idea 2:Customer benefit: Page 6
  7. 7. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 3: Customers as CharactersMain Character/Primary Customer(s)Name _____________________________ • Age __________ • Gender ____________ • Marital Status ______________ • Children (number and ages) __________________ • Location (rural, small town, medium, urban) ___________________ • Three adjectives to describe them _____________________________________ • What do they want? _______________________________________________ • What size role do they play in the story? (% of customer base) _________________ • Name _______________________________ • Age __________ • Gender ____________ • Marital Status ______________ • Children (number and ages) __________________ • Location (rural, small town, medium, urban) ___________________ • Three adjectives to describe them _____________________________________ • What do they want? _____________________________________________________ • What size role do they play in the story? (% of customer base) _________________ • Name _______________________________ • Age __________ • Gender ____________ • Marital Status ______________ • Children (number and ages) __________________ • Location (rural, small town, medium, urban) ___________________ • Three adjectives to describe them _____________________________________ • What do they want? _____________________________________________________ • What size role do they play in the story? (% of customer base) _________________ Page 7
  8. 8. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldDetailed Character Description WorksheetIt’s very helpful to have a very clear picture of your customers as characters, and to know asmuch about them as possible. This checklist helps draw a character sketch of people your brandwill interact with. Fill out one form for each persona, including the brand.Character Profile: (include a photo) Name: Age/Sex/Location: Education:Occupation:Responsibilities:Likes About Job or Home life:Dislikes About Job or Home life:Frustrations:Concerns:Customer for How Long:Needs:Wants:Role in Buying Process (decider, user, gatekeeper, advisor):Motivation to Buy:Social Channels Used and Experience in Channel:Optimal Social Times (when is s/he online?) Page 8
  9. 9. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 4: Finding Your Brand Tone & VoicePersonifying the Brand – Social Media is a PartySometimes you’re the host of the party, and sometimes you’re just another invited guest. Theimage you portray of your brand might not be what people actually think of you; and likewise, youcan change your image by participating in social channels.This is a very customer-centric model of discovery. When “I, your customer, exist in myrelationship networks… 1. Who is your Brand to me? (Relationship) 2. Why should we invite your brand along? (What do you bring to the party?) 3. How does the brand empower my network of associates and friends? (What do you do for me?) 4. How should I introduce you to my friends? 5. What will they tell me about you? 6. What kind of party are you having in your social channel? 7. How do we give recognition or status? Page 9
  10. 10. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 5: Content Calendar As Story ArcSeasonal, Sales, and Life Events1. Identify the seasonal events that are most influential on your customers.What are your customer objectives and obstacles around these events?(Example: For a young mom, Thanksgiving might be a stressful time. She wants to gain approvalfrom her and her spouse’s parents, and prove her worthiness by having an amazingThanksgiving dinner for the entire extended family. Her obstacles might be that she isn’t a greatcook, doesn’t know very many recipes, and she has never cooked for 12 people before.) Main Character 1: Seasonal Event Date(s) Character Objective Obstacle(s) Betsy, 28 yo mom Create a happy memory for Event 1 Valentines Day Feb 1-14 Time, resources her daughter Event 2 Mothers Day Event 3 Spring Break Event 4 Thanksgiving Main Character 2: Seasonal Event Date(s) Character Objective Obstacle(s) Brad, 32 yo dad Event 1 Valentines Day Feb 1-14 Demonstrate his love for wife Not romantic Event 2 Mothers Day Event 3 Summer Vacation Event 4 Christmas Main Character 3: Seasonal Event Date(s) Character Objective Obstacle(s) Event 1 Event 2 Event 3 Event 4 Page 10
  11. 11. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorld2. Brand Events – What are the most significant events for the brand during the year? What does the customer get from them? What tangible or emotional benefit do they get? Customer Sales Event Story Theme Date(s) Customer Benefits Obstacles Taking the family Labor Day Season of Change Great prices is expensive and a hassle Can’t get there CES The Future is Now Trendsetter himself Be a great dad and make Christmas Family Traditions Too busy to shop great memories Self esteem – show their Express the Real Social norms Halloween heroic/naughty/creative You self3. Life Events – What events happen in the lives of your characters/customers that are notnecessarily seasonal, but happen in common to us all? What are their benefits and obstacles? Character Character Life Event Date(s) Obstacle(s) Objective Logistics, schedule, Betsy Weddings Spring/Summer Create a fairy tale expense Memorial Day, Recall pride, sense of Forgotten or ignored Brad Military Service Veterans Day duty, show patriotism, past +/- 2 weeks sense of community Late Create great memories Expense, choosing Character 3 Spring break March/Early and friendships destination/experience April Character 4 Page 11
  12. 12. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldAnnual Event Calendar At-A-Glance Month Holiday/Event/Theme Main Character(s) Story Objective(s) Resolve to be a smart Jan Clearance Sale Becky mom Becky – pass on romantic Becky Feb Valentines Day traditions to kids Brad Brad – prove your love Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Page 12
  13. 13. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 6: Start The Story And Keep It GoingStory Starters and Rules for Scripted Improv 1. Ask questions to Get Story Idea. These set the conditions for the story to follow. For any story you tell, you need: a. Location/environment b. Character objectives c. Relationship between people (could be between brand and customers) d. Conflict e. Time limits This is easily done on Facebook, Twitter, and most social media channels. This technique can be used as a process of discovery to create/develop campaigns, AND be used as a check-in during a campaign to adjust the story according to interest and KPIs. Asking Who Is, Why, and Fill-in-the-Blank questions are great story-starters, and check- ins to either escalate the story, or take it in another direction. 2. AGREE and say YES, AND… Listen to what the other characters are saying and use their comments in Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc., to inform your next communication. Sometimes this means using an individual customer comment that is clever, sometimes it means using analytics to determine “most of our customers say…” Do not block or deny what your customers are saying. You cannot possibly defend yourself or change anyone’s mind online anyway. But you can play with them and engage by saying yes. (You CAN be selective and ignore some things, unless the noise becomes overwhelming.) 3. Give Up Control. You know where YOU want the story to go, but the story that is being told may not be the story you wanted to tell. That’s okay. You don’t have to know how the story is going to end (even though we set objectives at the beginning). No matter what happens, the story WILL end and you will have gained something valuable, one way or another. Page 13
  14. 14. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorld FLOW with the story. If you’re listening, saying “yes, and…”, and incorporating what is being said into the narrative, you will learn, influence, and most importantly, truly engage with your customers. They will continue to engage with you as long as the story is compelling. 4. Fail Big! Be bold in your ideas and execution. You cannot be GREAT (and memorable) if you’re not bold and shooting for a Big Win. There is nothing worse than a boring, pointless story; customers get tuned out and make you irrelevant. Even a big failure in telling your story will get you talked about. That will humanize you and endear you to some, and turn others away, AND it will gain you attention for you NEXT story. People will be eager to see how you recover from a failure and you can develop DEEPER loyalty by recovering from a failure. You just can’t fail 3X’s in a row. 5. Make Statements. Give your characters something to respond to and work with! Most brands try not to offend their customers, and that’s understandable. In doing so, they don’t advance the story, and don’t show any personality or connection with their customers, characters and audience — they are BORING. Which of these do you think will provoke a response and invite people to tell a personal story? 1. People are messy. 2. Who’s the messiest person in your house? 3. Men are so MESSY! 6. There Are No Mistakes — Only Opportunities. The whole point of a story is to entertain, inform, or inspire. We (audience and brand) LEARN from mistakes. Many people are entertained by finding mistakes embrace them. You just gave them an opportunity to show how smart they are! 7. Reincorporate! When something works, keep using it until it no longer works. Remember the rule of 3 for comedy: set-up, anticipation, pay-off. Page 14
  15. 15. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldWorksheet 7: Social Channels As GenresSocial Channels are both a distribution path and a storytelling device. There are bestpractices/rules in using each channel, similar to conventions used in story genres. While wefocus on online channels here, don’t forget to ALSO include print, TV, radio, other marketing.1. Channel: FacebookStrengths: Big audience potential, multi-media storytelling, multiple integration points — canconnect customers offline and online (events, check-ins, deals, encourage real-worldrelationships), threaded conversations, robust advertising platform, based on symmetricalrelationshipsLimitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:2. Channel: TwitterStrengths: Discovery (people curious about the unknown), hashtags/tagging conversation,trends, brevity, becoming multimedia; organic, paidLimitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:3. Channel: PinterestStrengths: Heavily female, aspirational content, visual identity, more topic oriented thanindividual oriented, pop-culture, fashion, buildLimitations: Page 15
  16. 16. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldStory Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:4. Channel: InstagramStrengths: Visual, creative, playfulLimitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:5. Channel: Linked InStrengths:Limitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:6. Channel: YouTube (other video channels)Strengths:Limitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:7. Channel: BlogsStrengths:Limitations: Page 16
  17. 17. Document Title Confidential | March 11, 2013LiveWorldStory Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:8. Channel: Mobile AppsStrengths:Limitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:10. Channel: Social Samba/StorytellingStrengths:Limitations:Story Engagement Frequency:Best Practices:11. Channel: Owned CommunitiesBest Used For:Limitations:Optimal Post Frequency:Best Practices: Page 17

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