Tribal Libraries Advocacy
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Tribal Libraries Advocacy

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Presentation given at the 5th Gathering of Arizona Tribal Libraries--April 14, 2008

Presentation given at the 5th Gathering of Arizona Tribal Libraries--April 14, 2008

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  • 1. Advocacy for Tribal Libraries Sandy Littletree April 14, 2008 5 th Gathering of Arizona Tribal Libraries Salt River Tribal Library
  • 2. What is Advocacy ?
  • 3. Why is this important to tribal libraries ?
  • 4. Who are library advocates?
  • 5. How do you do it?
  • 6. How do you do it?
  • 7. What is Advocacy?
  • 8. Advocacy = Public Relations + Lobbying + (Marketing and Publicity) + (Professionalism)
  • 9. Public relations the everyday advocacy of working to provide the best library services and taking everyday opportunities to tell people about the library
  • 10. Lobbying advocacy directed at decision-makers and politicians.
  • 11. Getting the support you need from people who are in a position to help you and the library.
  • 12. Getting decision makers, potential partners, and community members on the side of the library… through the messages you send on an ongoing basis.
  • 13. Why is this important to tribal libraries?
  • 14. Reasons why tribal libraries matter
    • Tribal libraries…
    • Serve a vital role in revitalizing and preserving tribal culture, history, and language
    • Promote literacy for our community
    • Bring technology to our people
    • Are important for the growth and development of our children
    • Empower tribal members
  • 15.
    • Bring reading material and news to tribal members
    • Promote intergenerational activities
    • Strengthen cultural identity
    • Serve as research centers for Tribal and non-tribal members
    • Belong to the people.
    Reasons why tribal libraries matter
  • 16. Tribal libraries are special places. Why is this important to tribal libraries?
  • 17. Educate our communities about why tribal libraries and librarians are essential in an information society. Why is this important to tribal libraries?
  • 18. The possibilities of positive growth are endless. Why is this important to tribal libraries?
  • 19. Decision makers may support the library in spirit, but may not realize all of the potential benefits a well-supported library would have for the community and its people. Now is the time to speak up for your library! Why is this important to tribal libraries?
  • 20. Who are tribal library advocates?
  • 21. Who are tribal library advocates?
    • Tribal and community leaders
    • Library users
    • Librarians and library staff
    • Potential advocates
  • 22. Potential advocates?
    • Many people would be glad to speak out for the tribal library if asked.
    • had good experiences in using libraries in the past
    • have family members who benefit from the library,
    • or who just believe that tribal libraries are important.
  • 23. How do you do it?
  • 24. Four ways to win support
    • Use every opportunity to tell people what’s going on in the library.
    • Don’t be afraid to speak up and ask for support.
    • Don’t do this alone.
    • Be generous. Giving is just as important as receiving
  • 25. Basic Tools
  • 26. Annual Report A basic tool for telling your library’s story, it should be brief, attractive and reinforce the library’s key message. Make sure it gets into the hands of tribal government officials, funders and other key stakeholders.
  • 27. Business Card Don’t forget the obvious. Be sure to include the library’s URL and hours. Give it out as often as you can.
  • 28. Fact Sheet
    • A good way to present key points quickly. Keep narrative to a minimum.
    • Use bullets to highlight key facts/statistics.
    • Shorter is better—no more than two pages.
    • Use with tribal officials, community groups, reporters or anyone who wants information—fast.
  • 29. News Release & Public Service Announcement Start with the most important information and end with the least. Be sure to cover the 5Ws (Who, What, When, Where, Why)—and H (How).
  • 30. Get Recognized
  • 31.
    • Honor Generations
    • It’s a good day to read
    • Native Pride
    • The heartbeat of your tribal community is
    • Tribal news
  • 32. Steps to Getting Started
    • Identify what you want
    • Gather statistics
    • Build your team
    • Make an action plan
    • Identify strategies
    • Have a memorable message
    • Target your audiences
    • Encourage everyday advocacy
  • 33. How do you do it?
  • 34. How do you do it?
  • 35. How do you do it?
    • How do you make your library visible?
    • How have you used the media (radio, newspapers, newsletters, etc) or other basic tools to your advantage?
    • How do you reach out to the community?
    • Any advice on speaking successfully (especially to tribal officials)?
    • How have you gotten others in the community to speak for the library?
    • How have you made the library the heart of your community?
  • 36. Start now! Don’t wait for a crisis.
  • 37. Ahehee‘ Thank You! Sandy Littletree [email_address]
  • 38. Image Credits
    • Slide 9: You have new Picture Mail!, uploaded May 23, 2006 by The Shifted Librarian , http://www.flickr.com/photos/shifted/152082945/
    • Slide 10 MIT Forum Hosted at UM, uploaded by alexdecarvalho , http://www.flickr.com/photos/adc/414753294/
    • Slide 11: Faithful Support for the Masses, uploaded April 27, 2005 by Pulpolux !!! , http://www.flickr.com/photos/pulpolux/11185712/
    • Slide 12: Lazy Sign, uploaded on October 11, 2007 by josephp , http://www.flickr.com/photos/sumsinnow/1541640811/
    • Slide 16-19: Photo taken at Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Library, Suitland, Maryland by Sandra Littletree
    • Slide 21: “Reading” from Sinte Gleska University, Mission, South Dakota. Permission to use given by Rachel Lindvall
    • Slide 22: Novus Ordo Seclorum, uploaded on November 23, 2004 by Dawn Endico ; http://www.flickr.com/photos/candiedwomanire/1651866/in/set-42477/
    • Slide 25: toolbox – open, uploaded on March 7, 2008 by salsaboy , http://www.flickr.com/photos/salsaboy/2316715896/
    • Slide 26: David Hayes – Editorial Report, uploaded on June 20, 2007 by openDemocracy , http://www.flickr.com/photos/opendemocracy/575778823/
    • Slide 27: Business card – back, uploaded on March 23, 2009 by Stuart Frisby , http://www.flickr.com/photos/36-degrees/510914804/
    • Slide 28: Drupal Modules as of 11/09/07, uploaded on November 13, 2007 by kentbye , http://www.flickr.com/photos/kentbye/2007464793/
    • Slide 29: A stack of newspapers, uploaded on November 21, 2007 by DRB62 , http://www.flickr.com/photos/drb62/2054107736/
    • Slide 30: How to get out of McDonalds, uploaded on July 4, 2005 by maebmij , http://www.flickr.com/photos/maebmij/23472646/
    • Slide 36: Panic button, uploaded April 6, 2007 by star5112 , http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnjoh/448665548/