Effective Reading Intervention: Incorporating Community Volunteers

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Amy Barto, Specialized Language Development Center

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Effective Reading Intervention: Incorporating Community Volunteers

  1. 1. Incorporating Community Volunteers for Effective Reading Intervention
  2. 2. • B I G I D E A S A N D C O M M U N I T Y R E S O U R C E S • C A L L T O A C T I O N & W I L D C A T L E A R N I N G L A B 2 0 1 3 • P R E L I M I N A R Y I M P A C T • F O R M I N G A M O D E L F O R I N C R E A S E D I M P A C T A N D U S E O F R E S O U R C E S Agenda
  3. 3. L I T E R A C Y I N O U R C O M M U N I T Y B I G I D E A S F O R I N T E R V E N T I O N C O M M U N I T Y R E S O U R C E S F O C U S O N R E A D I N G Big Ideas and Community Resources
  4. 4. Literacy Crisis in our Community  2009-2010 school year, 38.3% of students attending schools in Kent County are not at the proficient reading level (Standard and Poor’s School Evaluation Service)  20% of children with a learning disability entering our schools will face a significant challenge in learning to read (NIH)  If these children do not receive appropriate intervention by third grade (age nine), 74% of them will never catch up (NIH)
  5. 5. Harrison Park School GRPS District  Students Proficient in Reading at the end of 3rd Grade: 59.6%  Student Academic Growth 3-8: 12.7%  Students Proficient in Math and Reading 3-8: 16.6%  Students Proficient in Reading at the end of 3rd Grade: 53.2%  Student Academic Growth 3-8: 12.6%  Students Proficient in Math and Reading 3-8: 18.2% 2012-2013 MEAP Data
  6. 6. Effective Intervention Framework Specialized Instruction Strategic Instruction General Instruction
  7. 7. Common Models for Supplementary Reading Programs  Afterschool Programs with Activities  Activities may or may not be reading specific  Methodologies vary  Mentoring/Positive Interactions and Role Models  Activities may or may not be reading specific  Methodologies vary  Homework Assistance  Activities may or may not be reading specific  Methodologies vary  Comprehension and Fluency Practice  Activities may or may not be reading specific  Methodologies vary
  8. 8. Common Struggles  Scheduling of Volunteers  Resources needed by the school  Management/Coordination of physical and human resources  Student transfer of skills (e.g. relating to multiple settings)  Specialized training for working with students who struggle with learning  Need instruction rather than exposure only  Training in reading development and curriculum connection
  9. 9. Effective Reading Instruction Reading Phonological Awareness Decoding Fluency Vocabulary Comprehension
  10. 10. Call to Action for Summer 2013 H A R R I S O N P A R K S C H O O L I M P R O V E M E N T T E A M I D E N T I F I E D A G A P / N E E D : U N D E R A C H I E V E M E N T O F 2 N D G R A D E S T U D E N T S O N S P R I N G M A P S I N R E A D I N G A S C O M P A R E D T O P A T T E R N S O F G R A D E S 3 - 5
  11. 11. What can we do? Develop a community supported summer option focused on 2nd grade readers
  12. 12. KSSN Network Review of Student/Community Need and Request for Support – very limited funding! Secure Volunteers Secure Specialized Resources KSSN Community School Leadership Team Design Program Rationale, Format and Description Final Touches March/April 2013 March/April 2013 April 2013 April/May 2013May 2013
  13. 13. Wildcat Learning Lab Supplement school curriculum Targeted reading instruction 2nd grade students
  14. 14. Brief Site Resource Analysis GRPS Summer School Already Available & Already Funded Not targeted to specific grades Harrison Park School Facility and Staff in use for GRPS Summer School Facility and Staff in use for GRPS Summer School & Large need for 2nd grade reading push KSSN Site Coordinator Not Teaching Staff & No “Extra” Funding
  15. 15. Key Challenges  Funding  Trained Teachers/Tutors to provide instruction and effective intervention  Student supervision  Lack of resources for training for intervention  Personnel for supervision/coordination of adults
  16. 16. Gerontology Network SLD Center  Had a relationship with school and district  Need/Gap: volunteers needed specialized training & direction from educators for intervention (including materials)  Had a relationship with school and district  Need/Gap: minimal number of volunteers available & requirements for implementation of 1:1 intervention with fidelity In the Meantime…..
  17. 17. The Stars Aligned  GN and SLD were in conversations about developing collaboration options  SLD and GRPS were in conversations regarding expanding various collaborations for 2013-2014 school year  GRPS and GN were in conversation for maintaining collaborations for the 2013-2014 school year  The GR Community Foundation was in conversation with all three groups.
  18. 18. Wildcat Learning Lab Supplement school curriculum Targeted reading instruction 2nd grade students Community Vision
  19. 19. Responsibilities Training Pre and Post Assessment Materials Supervision of Fidelity of 1:1 Volunteer Tutors Homeroom Supervision Initiative Coordination Facility Students DIBELS Spring and Fall Homeroom Activities
  20. 20. Funding  Organizational structures provided much cost savings  SLD Center – no new program or materials required to be developed  Gerontology Network – no new program or funding required to provide volunteers for training and/or summer  GRPS – Harrison Park already in use for Summer School  Funding needed for Training, Training Materials and Internship Implementation
  21. 21. Program Description  Gerontology Network Senior volunteers trained in Phonics Fundamentals© will provide instruction & intervention  One hour 1:1 Language Links intervention (focused on phonological awareness and reading foundational skills)  One hour Homeroom focused on reading fluency and comprehension skills Language Links Homeroom Wildcat Learning Lab Specialized Intervention Strategic Instruction
  22. 22. Program Goal  Increase the success rate of this cohort of students and increase their success as 6th grade Challenge Scholars by providing rigorous summer learning supports focused in all areas of reading
  23. 23. Start Up: Specialized Intervention Intervention: Training of Specialized Tutors • June 4-June 13, 2013 Phonics Fundamentals: 32 hour training through SLD Center including curriculum materials & multisensory tools • 21 volunteers from GN trained to work with HP students at Wildcat Learning Lab Intervention • Baseline Assessment completed for each student by SLDC Assessment Specialists • GN Volunteers work directly with 2nd grade students during Wildcat Learning Lab • 21 students receive 1:1 reading instruction for 1 hour per day when in attendance at Wildcat Learning Lab • Post Assessment completed for each student by SLDC Assessment Specialists Intervention: Fidelity of Implementation • GN Volunteers work 1:1 with an SLDC Master Tutor for first 20 hours with a student (internship phase) • SLDC Observers provide direct feedback on curriculum use and methodology for interns as well continuing SLDC tutors
  24. 24. Funding Breakdown $11,300 • Phonics Fundamentals: 32 hour training through SLD Center including curriculum materials & multisensory tools $3,300 • Baseline Assessment completed for each student by SLDC Assessment Specialists • GN Volunteers work directly with 2nd grade students during Wildcat Learning Lab • 21 students receive 1:1 reading instruction for 1 hour per day when in attendance at Wildcat Learning Lab • Post Assessment completed for each student by SLDC Assessment Specialists • Coordination of student/tutor schedules and materials $4,400 • GN Volunteers work 1:1 with an SLDC Master Tutor for first 20 hours with a student (internship phase) • SLDC Observers provide direct feedback on curriculum use and methodology for interns as well continuing SLDC tutors
  25. 25. Our “AHA!” of Sustainability $3,300 • Baseline Assessment completed for each student by SLDC Assessment Specialists • GN Volunteers work directly with 2nd grade students during Wildcat Learning Lab • 21 students receive 1:1 reading instruction for 1 hour per day when in attendance at Wildcat Learning Lab • Post Assessment completed for each student by SLDC Assessment Specialists • Coordination of student/tutor schedules and materials • Bulk of cost for volunteers trained for specialized intervention was training and internship • To maintain Language Links with same volunteers approximately $3,300 during academic year per site
  26. 26. Additional Goal  “large scale social change comes from better cross- sector coordination rather than from the isolated intervention of individual organizations” (Kania & Kramer, 2011)  Establish a framework for collaboration for collective impact rather than isolated impact  a.k.a. maximize the value of the expertise and development established during the summer program
  27. 27. Language Links Experience Corps  K-3rd grade students  8 hours – 35 hours per week  12 GRPS schools  470 students  Training for mentoring and reading support  Use school materials with teacher guidance  Ongoing trainings  1st-3rd grade students  2-4 hours per week  4 GRPS schools  18 students  Specialized training for 1:1 multisensory instruction  Use PF© and multisensory materials (aligned with common core) and supplements classroom instruction  Ongoing specialized trainings Organizational Impact 2012-2013
  28. 28. Potential Collective Impact 2013-2014 Impact through ONLY those volunteers trained during summer 2013  194 students  Summer Impact: minimum of 18 students through Wildcat Learning Lab and LOOP  Academic Year Impact: 176 students  13,090 Hours of Intervention  Summer Hours of Intervention: 230  Academic Year Hours of Intervention: 10,560  6 GRPS Buildings  Building Breakdown of Impact by Percentage  Summer  Harrison Park, 100%  Academic Year 2013-2014  Harrison Park, 59%  Campus, 14%  Palmer, 9%  Mulick Park, 5%  Buchanan, 9%  Brookside, 9%
  29. 29. “…FINDINGS SUPPORT A STRONG FOCUS IN TITLE I SCHOOLS ON IMPROVING CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION AND THEN PROVIDING ONE-TO-ONE, PHONETIC TUTORING TO STUDENTS WHO CONTINUE TO EXPERIENCE DIFFICULTIES” (SLAVIN, 2011) Impact Measurement
  30. 30. Program Goal Data  Increase the success rate of this cohort of students and increase their success as 6th grade Challenge Scholars by providing rigorous summer learning supports focused in all areas of reading  Based on pre/post data  Average number of LL hours: 15.6  Measurement: Phonics Fundamentals© Inventory  Average 4% increase in reading skills  Do not yet have MAPS for students Program Assessment
  31. 31. Experience Corps  Use school based academic and attendance data for individual students  MAPS, DIBELS and MEAP  Students selected by school admin and teachers  Teacher Feedback  More than 80% of teachers report that students who work with AARP Experience Corps members made significant academic progress  2012-2013 were NOT in Harrison Park School
  32. 32. Language Links Wildcat Learning Lab 2013  Spring 2013, Harrison Park with 1st grade students (not yet pub.)  2 groups of 4 students  Average number of LL hours: 25  Measurement: Phonics Fundamentals© Inventory  LL students: average 9% increase in reading skills  Non LL students: average 5% increase in reading skills  Consistent with 20 years of LL data in GRPS, KPS and Portage Public Schools  Based on pre/post data  Average number of LL hours: 15.6  Measurement: Phonics Fundamentals© Inventory  Average 4% increase in reading skills  Do not yet have student MAPS data LL and Harrison Park
  33. 33. “THE POWER OF COLLECTIVE ACTION COMES NOT FROM THE SHEER NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS OR THE UNIFORMITY OF THEIR EFFORTS, BUT FROM THE COORDINATION OF THEIR DIFFERENTIATED ACTIVITIES THROUGH A MUTUALLY REINFORCING PLAN OF ACTION” (KANIA & KRAMER, 2011) Forming a Model for Increased Impact of Volunteer Programs
  34. 34. Collaboration Specialized Instruction Strategic Instruction General Instruction
  35. 35. Leveled Volunteer Training Phonics Fundamentals© Multisensory Reading: Rules and Tools Reading Development and Language Processing  Specialized training for working with students who struggle with learning  General Instruction Foundation  Instructional Techniques and Foundations for Curriculum Scope & Sequence  Specialized Training for Intensive Intervention Planning
  36. 36. Leveled Programs for Volunteers  Varied opportunities to maximize expertise of volunteers  Volunteers with specialized trainings in all GN programs as appropriate  Expand options for volunteers of both organizations  Maximize support for student transfer of skills  Experience Corps volunteers see in settings outside of Language Links and can use multisensory supports in areas other than Reading Experience Corps Language Links Experience Corps Foster Grandparents
  37. 37. Sustainability  Experience Corps and Language Links already supported programs within 4-6 school buildings  Maintain efforts for securing community funds of support  Increase ability to report collective impact to shared donors  Phonics Fundamentals© trainings already offered twice a year  Additional funding will be needed for additional trainings and internships  Sustainable through collaboration!
  38. 38. S P E E D B U M P S C E L E B R A T I O N S O U T L I E R S Last Thoughts
  39. 39. Speed Bumps  Recruitment of Students  Targeted for 18-21 students  Principal brought in students from Summer School which varied ages more than planned  Had 6-8 with 5 completing the entire Lab  Attendance of Students  None of the students were present for all 40 hours of available instruction  Maximum Language Links instruction was 18 hours  Moving students into program after start date impacted motivation  Format of Lab Varied from Usual for All Organizations  KSSN Site Coordinator Moved  LL Coordinator not available in summer  Shortage of Master Tutors to mentor for internships  Volunteers used to 1:1 settings rather than working in proximity  EC Volunteers receive daily communication (and materials) from classroom teacher/school
  40. 40. Celebrations  Student numbers allowed for increased observation opportunities for interns  Increased opportunities for volunteers  Sep 2013:  One student was from another GRPS Elementary School. She will be repeating 1st grade this year.  Direct feedback: this student noticeably increased her MAPS Reading score to 49%ile and has “finally” moved to the yellow level on DIBELS (from Intense to Strategic)
  41. 41. Outliers  Materials Management  PF materials are copyrighted and in use only for Language Links or SLD Tutoring Sessions  Building Coordination for School Year  Consistent communications with district  Collaboration outside of GRPS  Student numbers allowed for increased observation opportunities for interns  Collective definition of data measurements  Full data analysis  Coordination of data sharing and compilation of report out
  42. 42. Research Support Hernandez, Donald J. (2012) Double Jeopardy: How Third- Grade Reading Skills and Poverty Influence High School Gradution. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. Kania, John & Mark Kramer (2011) Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review. National Center for Reading Disabilities. (2011). Parent’s Guide to RtI. National Reading Panel. Teaching Children to Read. Summary Report (April 13, 2000) Slavin, Robert. (2011) Effective Reading Programs for Title I Schools. John Hopkins University. Wolf, M. (2007) Proust and the Squid: the story and sequence of the reading brain. Harper Collins Publishers.

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