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Literate environment analysis presentation
 

Literate environment analysis presentation

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    Literate environment analysis presentation Literate environment analysis presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Creating a Literate Environment By: Lisette Vargas Walden University Dr. Bernice GregoryEDUC6706-3: The Beginning Reader PreK-3rd
    • Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners (P-3)O In creating a literate environment there are three perspectives to keep in mind: interactive, critical, and responsive.O A better purpose for literacy education today would be to look at implementing instruction with fidelity to making students better, “ readers, writers, thinkers, and speakers,” not teaching specific program or text with fidelity(Laureate Education, Inc., 2010).O As a professional teacher, or as I tell my children-a professional learner, collaboration between families, colleagues, administration and our community in order to make sure that my students achieve the highest literacy potential (National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1998).O The more you know about your students, the better you will be able to connect them with texts that can have a profound impact upon them (Laureate Education, 2010b).O Everyone has experiences that helped shape how they perceive themselves as literate beings (Laureate Education, 2010a). CREATE A SENSE OF ERGENCY FOR LEARNING AND READING!!
    • Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners (P-3)O Through non-cognitive assessments, teachers can learn about a student’s motivations, self-concept, interests, and attitudes (Afflerbach, 2007). O• Some Non-cognitive assessments include: • Interest Surveys • Elementary Reading Attitude Surveys or ERAS (McKenna & Kear, 1990). • Multiple Intelligence Survey • Interest Games • “Me Stew” (Laureate Education, 2010b). • Student interviews and conferences • Teacher Observations • Literacy Autobiographies
    • Getting to Know Your Literacy Learners (P-3)O Cognitive assessments focus on the skills and strategies used by a student as they develop as a reader (Afflerbach, 2007).O Some Cognitive assessments include:• Reading inventories• Developmental Reading Assessments (DRA)• NWEA• Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literary Skills tests (DIBLES) or AIMS Web• Running Records• Checklists
    • Selecting TextsFrom printed books to digital media, today’s texts come in a variety offorms, all of which should reside in the literacy classroom (LaureateEducation, 2010c). The Literary Matrix Linguistic Texts (word orientated) O The matrix is intended to help educators ensure that they have a balance among the texts they use in the classroom (Laureate Education, 2010c). Informational Texts O As an instructional decision maker, the matrix helps you to Narrative Texts see the landscape of texts that you are using in the classroom … It gives you a “big picture” that is often times missed and helps keep goals ever-present in your mind (Laureate Education, 2010c). Semiotic Texts (picture orientated)
    • Literacy Lesson: Interactive PerspectiveO The primary goal of the Interactive Perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can independently navigate through the textual world (Laureate Education, 2010d).O When approaching literacy instruction from the Interactive Perspective, teachers are to help students become strategic processors (Laureate Education, 2010d).O Strategic processing should be threaded through all Five Pillars: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension (Laureate Education, 2010d).
    • Feedback• What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruction from viewing this presentation?• How might the information presented change your literacy practices and/or your literacy interactions with students?• In what ways can I support you in the literacy development of your students or children? How might you support me in my work with students or your children?• What questions do you have?
    • ReferencesO Afflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, Inc.O Castek, J., Bevans-Mangelson, J., & Goldstone, B. (2006). Reading adventures online: Five ways to introduce the new literacies of the Internet through childrens literature. Reading Teacher, 59(7), 714-728. doi:10.1598/RT.59.7.12O Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). Getting To Know Your Students. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: AuthorO Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Literacy Autobiographies. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.O Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Analyzing and selecting texts. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.O Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010d). Strategic Processing. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.O Laureate Education Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010e). Critical Perspective {Webcast}. The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.O Laureate Education Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010f). Response Perspective {Webcast}. The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.O Tompkins, G. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach. Boston, MA: Pearson Custom Publishing.