Racing to the Future of Learner Support & Academic Success
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  • The Networked Student was inspired by CCK08, a Connectivism course offered by George Siemens and Stephen Downes during fall 2008. It depicts an actual project completed by Wendy Drexler's high school students. The Networked Student concept map was inspired by Alec Couros' Networked Teacher. I hope that teachers will use it to help their colleagues, parents, and students understand networked learning in the 21st century.
  • We had F2F as our only mode of SS & AS – we needed to use Technology to reach our remote students, but then we started to see that technology could also enhance our service for all students – technology was a VALUE ADDED (Force Multiplier) at first and as you will see later, it is becoing a part of a truly blended model of AS & SS
  • Make a reflections booklet….Lisa – to guide through activities…tacy lead
  • The collaborative nature of wikis makes it a great tool for small teams of people who need to create and distribute information to a group of readers. 
  • I am not someone who particularly loves facebook. However, I have found it to be quite useful. I can watch the posts made by students and see where they might need help or where I can offer support/encourage or congratulations.
  • I am not someone who particularly loves facebook. However, I have found it to be quite useful. I can watch the posts made by students and see where they might need help or where I can offer support/encourage or congratulations.

Racing to the Future of Learner Support & Academic Success Racing to the Future of Learner Support & Academic Success Presentation Transcript

  • National College Learning Center Association (NCLCA) Post-Conference Institute October 2010            Charlotte, NC Racing Into the Future of Learner Support & Center Management Dr. Lisa D’Adamo-Weinstein Director of Academic Support Northeast Center SUNY Empire State College   Dr. Tacy Holliday Director of the Science Learning Center Germantown Campus, Montgomery College   Craig Lamb Director of Academic Support Center for Distance Learning SUNY Empire State College
  • Emerging technologies such as social networking, multi-media sharing, collaborative workspaces, and mobile technologies are significantly changing the nature of learning and learner expectations for interaction, access, and engagement. Learning center professionals need to leverage these emerging technologies in ways that can enhance the ways in which we deliver services, create resources, market our centers, manage and train staff, and evaluate our centers. Lisa Tacy Craig
  • Agenda
      • Introductions
      • Students Today
      • Technology and Learning
      • Assessing What Tech You Have & Want
      • Learning Center Tech – Overview and Organization
        • What is x?
        • How can x be used with center management?
        • How can x be used to enhance student learning?
      • Wikis
      • Web Videos
      • Social Media
      • Implementing Tech @ your Learning Center
        • Wildest dreams
        • Defining your focus
        • Starting your plan
  • Quick Intros “Tweet” Yourself – 140 words or less
    • Where are you from (college, university, other)?
    • What role do you play at your institution?
    • What do you hope to get out of this post-conference institute?
  • Source: A Vision of Students Today http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o A short video summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. Created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University. There is a community college student video in response to this one at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hN8GDHZPOvE Who are our students today?
  • RESEARCH on Technology & Students Today
      • 98.5% have some type of computer
      • 82.2% have personal LAPTOP computers (2008, in 2007 - 75%)
      • Average of 19.6 hours a week online for school, work and/or recreation.
        • 69% < 20hours
        • 7.4% > 40 hours
        • Community college students show significantly less time online – 14.8 hrs
      • More than 82% have used a Course Management System (CMS), with more than 46% saying that they have use a CMS many times every week
      • 85.2% have interacted with at least one SNS - social network service (Facebook, Myspace, etc…). with Facebook being the predominate SNS. (2008, in 2007 -80%)
      • 61% of respondents agree that IT within a course improved their learning
      • Over 40% said that they are more engaged in a course requiring IT
    • Sources : EDUCAUSE Applied Research Center ( ECAR )
      • 2008 Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology
      • 2007 Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology
    How’d They & Who’d They? 27, 317 respondents – most “traditional” (under 25 years of age – 78.8%) Attending 4yr institutions (87.8%) Most full-time (84%) Most public (74.8%) 32.2% at schools > 15,000 students.
  • RESEARCH on Technology & Students Today
      • 98.5% have some type of computer
      • 82.2% have personal LAPTOP computers (2008, in 2007 - 75%)
      • Average of 19.6 hours a week online for school, work and/or recreation.
        • 69% < 20hours
        • 7.4% > 40 hours
        • Community college students show significantly less time online – 14.8 hrs
      • More than 82% have used a Course Management System (CMS), with more than 46% saying that they have use a CMS many times every week
      • 85.2% have interacted with at least one SNS - social network service (Facebook, Myspace, etc…). with Facebook being the predominate SNS. (2008, in 2007 -80%)
      • 61% of respondents agree that IT within a course improved their learning
      • Over 40% said that they are more engaged in a course requiring IT
    • Sources : EDUCAUSE Applied Research Center ( ECAR )
      • 2008 Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology
      • 2007 Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology
    How’d They & Who’d They? 27, 317 respondents – most “traditional” (under 25 years of age – 78.8%), Attending 4yr institutions (87.8%) Most full-time (84%) Most public (74.8%) 32.2% at schools > 15,000 students. They have the technology & they are using it, and…
  • RESEARCH on Student Engagement & Technology Source National Survey of Student Engagement ( Promoting Engagment for All Students: The Imperitive to Look Within, 2008 Result s) “ For both first-year and senior students, online learners were more likely than classroom-based learners to: • Be older, transfer, and first-generation students. • Very often participate in course activities that challenged them intellectually. • Very often participate in discussions that enhanced their understanding of different cultures. • Very often discuss topics of importance to their major.” (p. 16) “ Online courses seem to stimulate more intellectual challenge and educational gains . This suggests that integrating technology-enhanced courses into the curriculum for all students might have some salutary benefits .” (p. 16)
  • RESEARCH on Student Engagement & Technology Source National Survey of Student Engagement ( Promoting Engagment for All Students: The Imperitive to Look Within, 2008 Result s) “ For both first-year and senior students, online learners were more likely than classroom-based learners to: • Be older, transfer, and first-generation students. • Very often participate in course activities that challenged them intellectually. • Very often participate in discussions that enhanced their understanding of different cultures. • Very often discuss topics of importance to their major.” (p. 16) “ Online courses seem to stimulate more intellectual challenge and educational gains . This suggests that integrating technology-enhanced courses into the curriculum for all students might have some salutary benefits .” (p. 16)
  • But, while most respondents like information technology (IT) as part of their learning… Conclusion of the Executive Summary of the 2008 Educause Study Available at http://www.educause.edu/
  • But, while most respondents like information technology (IT) as part of their learning… Conclusion of the Executive Summary of the 2008 Educause Study Available at http://www.educause.edu/
  •  
  • Networked Student
    • VIDEO - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwM4ieFOotA
    http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/drexler.html
  • So, students are online and on computers, they are more engaged when there is online learning, and they also want F2F interactions…
      • While, colleges are exploring, integrating and infusing technology into every aspect of the college experience, we need to be mindful that technology is not the only way that students today want to engage .
      • BUT, students expect to have technology be a part of their daily lives, so F2F is not the only way to engage students.
      • When we take this need for blending F2F with technology, many college professionals don’t have the time, support, resources, nor expertise to infuse their existing F2F programs and services with technology .
      • BUT, professionals in Academic Support and Student Services need to adapt the ways in which we deliver services in order to better enhance and engage students in their college experience using a blended approach to service delivery and resource access.
    •  
    • How can these complicated and somewhat conflicting needs/concerns be addressed?
  • Technology Enhancing Learning What you should consider for academic support and learning assistance…
      • BENEFITS to LEARNERS
      • BENEFITS to COLLEGE OVERALL & ACADEMIC SUPPORT/STUDENT SERVICES
      • BENEFITS to ACADEMIC SUPPORT/STUDENT SERVICES STAFF
        • Learning is flexible, accessible, and tailored to a variety of learning preferences. Students can explore, have choice, & engage/create using different modalities where and when they choose to access…
        • Beneficial in both face-2-face and technology enhanced mediums. One does not necessarily have to replace the other – center and college missions as well as learner needs drive the blended use of these learning engagements.
        • Maximize resources (human and time), training options open up, F2F interactions can take on depth when students come into a learning center or seek out student services having gone over the “basics” online – deeper conversations faster – high touch and high quality at the same time
  • Grounding Points: Quotations to Remember
      • “ The particular characteristics and needs of each individual institution drive the organization of [academic support] programs, the format of service delivery, the overall management and operation of the program and the methods of program evaluation.”
      • - Casazza, M. E. & Silverman, S. (1996). Learning Assistance and Developmental Education . San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. p. 71
      • “ In addition to background, aptitude, ability to learn quickly, and the desire to learn, students need persistence, flexibility, and a willingness to cooperate with instructors’ demands and institutional policies if they are to succeed in college.”
      • - Maxwell, M. (1997). Improving Student Learning Skills .
      • H&H Publishing: Clearwater, FL. p. 135
    Student Success Academic Support & Learning Assistance
  • Assessing What Tech You Have & Want… For Technology & Learning Assistance on Your Campus What kinds of technology are you currently using? What kinds of technology are your students using? What do you have to support tech at your institution? What goals do you have for enhancing student learning? What goals do you have for improving center management and staff professional development?
  • Learningcentertech.pbworks.com
  • Wikis, Web Videos, & Social Media
    • What is X and how can I make one/get started?
    • How can I use X for staff development/center management?
    • How can I use X to enhance student learning and support?
    •  
    •  
  • Wiki's
  • What is a Wiki ...
      • A page, site, or document that is accessable and editable by multiple users
      • The focus of the tool is on collaboration
      • EX: Wikipedia, WikiLeaks, LearningCenterTech 
  • ...and how can I make one?
      • Think about the wiki platform that you will use
    •  
      • Think about the use or function of your wiki
    •  
    •  
      • Add your users and dive in!
      • Build your &quot;wiki&quot; foundation
  • Staff Development/Center Management
      • Wiki as collaboration and communication space.
        • Security: Control who can use the space and how they can use it.
  • Staff Development/Center Management
      • Wiki as e-file cabinet
        • Training resources, weekly schedule, policies & procedures, FAQs, guidelines for tutoring/solving center problems/or storage for commonly used forms.
    •  
  •  
  • Staff Development/Center Management
      • Wiki-Meetings
        • Enhance meetings: Keep minutes of the meeting and give people additional time to give feedback.
        • Replace some meetings: Keep track of a project through the wiki.
    •  
      • Project organization/documentation
        • With wiki organization, all participants in the project can get the same information and are able to share ideas seamlessly.  
  • Staff Development/Center Management
      • Other Ideas
        • Brainstorming sessions (30/30)
        • Asynchronous tutor training (example: case studies with area for discussion)
        • Professional development tool
  • Learner Support/Development Wikis can be used as curricular tools for students to access and/or collaborate on in first-year, study skills or developmental education classes.  Wikis can also be used for as repositories for information for students, professional staff, and tutors containing academic support and learning skills content,  FAQs, policies, procedures, insights, etc. Idea #1 - Create a wiki for your learning center, link it to your existing website and market it as a collaborative learning space where current students and alumni can add information about what it means to be a successful student at your institution. Here's an example for the Office of Academic Support at the Northeast Center of SUNY Empire State College.   Idea #2 - Use a wiki as part of repository for handouts, study guides, and workshop materials. Ask students to add to and review the content on these materials.  Students can describe their experiences using the skills or resources you post. Most wikis will support videos, so you can even post videos of your workshops.   Idea #3 - Use a wiki as a collaborative learning space for your courses.  I've just started two for the Fall 2009 term for two academic support courses - Enhancing the Academic Eye: Multiple Perspectives on Thinking and Learning  &  Critical Thinking & Research .   Idea #4 -  Have your students create their own wikis for individual presentations and/or projects. They can use the wiki as a collaborative learning space if they are working on a group project or if they are  creating their own digital learning portfolio.    Wikis in Support of Student Learning
  • necacademicsupport.pbworks.com
  •  
  • Study Groups Christine: I love taking the online courses (in Elluminate) Jess: if only i could be working out an doing this all at once
  •  
  • http://peercoaches.pbworks.com/
  •  
  • http://necntsw.pbworks.com/ http://www.youtube.com/user/NortheastCenterVids
  • Web Videos
  • What are Web Videos...
      • Short clips of video, usually in a digital format, often found on web pages and shared through links
    •  
      • Known for being easily accessable and transferable (email, RSS, wall post, etc) 
    •  
      • Can often be embedded with ease
    •  
  • ... and how can I make one?
      • Think about what you want to record, and why?
        •   Script? Captions? Length?
        • Audience
    •   
      • Get a recording device (digital camera, laptop, etc)
        • Can you rent or borrow a camera?
    •  
      • Use preinstalled computer software to edit and adjust the video (Microsoft Movie Maker), or upload to a video holding website (YouTube)
  • Staff Development/Center Management
      • Record feedback from student interviews for use in staff training.
      • Make or use video case studies for use in staff training
      • Orientation video for new hires.
      • Have an employee review and reflect on his or her recorded performance.
      • Montage of student testimonials for marketing or for managing &quot;up&quot; the chain of command.
  • Sample Writing Center Training http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHOA623j3aM
  • Web Videos in Support of Student Learning
    • Web videos can be used to support student learning in so many different ways... You can use  existing videos, create your own, or have students create their own. 
    •  
    • Idea #1 - Use Existing Videos – Use existing YouTube videos & channels that include a series of videos related to study skills.  Some are student generated and some are produced by learning center professionals. There are a range of videos, with most coming the &quot;How To&quot; perspective.   
    •  
    • Idea #2 - Create your own videos.  You can use a simple webcamera set up or you can use some free resources to create a &quot;video&quot; through Voki (see a sample on the bottom front page of this wiki), or you can do some screen captures for free by using Jing .  Either way, you can add very simple videos without needing a webcamera or expensive video equipment.  Here's a link for some more how-tos for creating your own videos - Resources for educators - http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/blog/2009/4/web2tools.html
    •  
    •  
    • Idea #3 - Have students create their own videos as part of a class project or as testimonials when they have found the courses and services of your learning center to be useful  If you are having students make the videos as a course assignment, here is a link to a rubric you can use to help assess the students' work.
    •  
    • A+ Video Project Rubric A grading rubric created by Joan Vandervelde from the University of Wisconsin - Stout
    •  
  •  
  • Web Videos and Student Learning www.youtube.com/necacademicsupport
  •  
  •  
  • Social Media
  • What is Social Media...
      • Media designed and developed for social interaction. Sharing and interacting is the key
    •  
      • Highly accessible, scalable and easy to publish
    •  
      • The author may or may not be the authority
    •  
      • Wikis and web videos are forms of social media
  • ... and how can I get started?
      • Define your purpose for using social media?
        • What do you hope to provide or accomplish?
        •   How will your audience use this tool/service?
      • Select your social media tool
        • Will you need to pay for the advanced version or should the free version suffice?
        •   Who might you need to seek permission from?
      • Send invitations to your audience
      • Play, try, explore, test, etc...
  • Staff Development/Center Management
      • Collaborate
        • We did this presentation using Google Docs
    •  
      • Build community with social media.
        • Keep in touch with current students/alumni.
          • Learn about student/alumni success (Heroes/Stories to share with your supervisor).
          • Market to current students.
          • Scan for opportunities to serve.
          • Get feedback on services/products
    •  
      • Use what your &quot;tribe&quot; is using for easiest access.
    •  
  • Social Media in Support of Student Learning As an instructional tool in study skills, development education, and other courses, social networking can help connect students based on interests, help instructors learn more about students and help students learn more about their instructors.   Using existing social networking sites like Facebook can be a great way to tap into the virtual spaces your students are already involved in. However, you shouldn't limit your understanding of social networking to only include only sites like Facebook and MySpace.  LinkedIn can be used to help students begin to think about their professional image and be linked to a career center course or be the basis of a professional e-portfolio.   Social networking and social media as a way of reaching students in your classes and learning centers is something that can expand your reach and find out more about what your students are really interested in. You can also direct them to what you think is important in the areas of learning assistance, tutoring, developmental education, study skills, etc.  By using social bookmarking sites like you can also use RSS feeds to keep students informed about updates .
  • http://www.usnews.com/articles/education/best-colleges/2010/08/16/twitter-goes-to-college-.html
  • Web Videos and Student Learning
  •  
  •  
  • From: Drexler, W. (2010). The networked student model for construction of personal learning environments: Balancing teacher control and student autonomy. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology , 26(3), 369-385. http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/drexler.html Technology Enhanced Personal Learning Environments
  • What holds us back?
    • Possible Reasons
      • I don't know how to do &quot;that.&quot;
      • I need support from __________.
      • I'm afraid &quot;it&quot; won't work.
      • I'm afraid that &quot;they&quot; won't like it.
      • Other...
  •  
  • How to Change the Culture
      • Extreme: &quot;Reward excellent failure. Punish mediocre success.&quot; &quot;Fail faster. Succeed sooner.&quot; &quot;Fail. Forward. Fast.&quot; --Tom Peters, Management Consultant
      • Baby steps: Pilot. Measure/Report. Build on Success.
      • Always: Heroes, stories, and demos.
  • ACTIVITY #1 – Wildest Dreams… For Technology & Learning Assistance on Your Campus Directions : Don’t be burdened by constraints – what (related to technology & the delivery of learning assistance programs & services) do you wish you had, could learn, has been on your “To Do” list that you haven’t had the chance to get to? List 10 things – Your Ultimate Wish List
  • ACTIVITY #2 – Focusing on Just One Thing For Technology & Learning Assistance on Your Campus Directions: Pick from your wish list. What is your number one interest/priority?-- You can determine this based on your center/college’s constraints, $$$, time (workload, seasonal demands, etc.), staff desires/access, student needs, access to technology, etc. Defining your top priority… Major idea/goal/priority - Narrowing it down… List at least 3 components related to this idea/goal/priority – 1. 2. 3. What research/people/resources/etc. do you need to connect with to get a start on making your idea/goal/priority a reality? Outline some of the first steps you need to take.
  • ACTIVITY #3 – Making Your Plan For Technology & Learning Assistance on Your Campus
    • Directions: In Small Groups – review your focus and flesh out what you can do to take action – develop your action plan with your group.
    • What new insights and ideas to enact your plan do you have?
    • CREATING A Detailed “To Do” List for this Project
    • While at the conference….
    • Immediately upon my return to the office…
    • 2nd Week after the conference
    • 1st Month after the conference