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Closing the Loop

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  • Sticky notes—What specific questions are you hoping that this session will answer? If you don’t have any specific questions, what are you hoping to get out of this session?
  • CB To give you an idea where we’re coming from…We are from East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma. Ada has a population of about 16,000 and is located 90 miles from Oklahoma City. East Central is a regional public university offering Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees, with an enrollment of about 4400 students. East Central University’s Linscheid Library has 5 full-time librarian positions, in addition to the dean, and offers 75 hours of operation each week during the regular semesters.
  • AL talks about steps 1 and 2 briefly
  • CB ( 10 minutes ) One kind of instruction assessment involves student learning outcomes. This is a direction that we are moving toward, by looking at SAILs test scores and other measurements. Until recently, we’ve been focused on rather traditional forms of program assessment, like surveys, usage data, and evaluation forms, rather than on student learning. Currently and historically, we’ve collected traditional data in three areas for our program assessment: reference, instruction, and resources.
  • For reference program assessment, we have two measurements: evaluation forms which are completed by the other librarians, and reference assessment survey cards which patrons are invited to fill out after reference interactions.
  • For instruction program assessment, we have three data points: peer evaluations which are completed by the other librarians, faculty or instructor evaluations which are completed by the instructor of the course for which we are providing library instruction, and student evaluations which are completed by the students in the course.
  • Now that you know what kinds of data we collect, we’d like to know…what kinds of data do you collect?
  • CB talks about step 4 briefly, then AL talks about Step 5: Closing the Loop CB: Once you’ve collected your data, don’t just put it on a shelf. You need to spend some time analyzing and interpreting the data. This is when you would apply any statistical analyses that you may want to do. This step is really about identifying the highs, lows, and mid-points of your data. Where are you doing well? What area needs the most help? And so on…Once you’ve identified these areas, then you can move on to your final step of using the data to close the loop.
  • AL
  • AL explains data, then we tag team the modeling session. CB hands out data sheet while AL explains the data
  • Tag team
  • CB 1. Here we mean the causes for the low points in your data. Sometimes there are multiple causes for one poor rating. Sometimes there is one root cause underlying multiple low scores…So try to keep this in mind and cast your net widely while you’re brainstorming possible problems. 2. Select the problem to address. Which problem seems to be the likeliest or the most pressing? 3. Brainstorm many possible solutions to the problem, and the resources needed for each solution. Again, you want to brainstorm as many solutions as possible because if your initial intervention doesn’t work you might be coming back to this list. And, of course, we need to take into account the resources needed for each solution at this point. Sometimes the best solution just might not be feasible once you start looking at the resources. We all have constraints that we have to work within. 4. Finally, select a strategy that seems feasible and promising, and implement it. Now, let’s apply this process to the dataset that we’ve been looking at.
  • Tag team
  • CB (AL hands out worksheets) Now, it’s your turn! Let’s break into groups of 3-5 people. (even # of groups) (Once we’ve gotten the groups organized…) Let’s start by having you all introduce yourselves to your group. Maybe say your name, where you’re from, and what position you hold at your institution. Ok, now we are going to hand out some data sets and you are going to go through the closing the loop process using the worksheet on the back of your data set. Two groups will look at each set of data, so we’ll be interested to see what different strategies are selected. Once everyone is done, we’ll come back together, and each group will have a chance to present about their process. Adrianna and I will be roaming around to help answer any questions… (We’d like 6 or 9 groups so that each dataset is assigned to at least two groups) (After 20 minutes , I’ll bring the groups back together, and then they will present for 20 minutes .)
  • AL
  • AL
  • AL
  • AL (and CB)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Georgia International Information Literacy Conference September 21, 2012 Closing the Loop: UsingAssessment Data to ImproveLibrary Instruction Programs Adrianna Lancaster, Dean Chelsea Baker, Instruction & Circulation Librarian East Central University Linscheid Library
    • 2. Institutional Snapshot
    • 3. Assessment Process
    • 4. Kinds of Data
    • 5. Reference Assessment Data• Peer Evaluation Forms• Reference Assessment Survey Cards
    • 6. Instruction Assessment Data• Peer Evaluation Forms• Faculty Evaluation Forms• Student Evaluation Forms
    • 7. What Kinds of Data Do You Collect?
    • 8. Assessment Process
    • 9. Closing the Loop… Why Not?
    • 10. Our DataPeer Evaluations Survey Questions 1. Does the librarian seem approachable and generally aware of the reference floor while at the reference desk? 2. Does the librarian greet people in a courteous manner as they approach the reference desk? 3. Does the librarian understand the users needs and respond accordingly? 4. Does the librarian make full use of the available resources to meet the user’s needs? 5. Does the librarian seem at ease and take steps to make the user comfortable? 6. Does the librarian ask follow-up questions to ensure the users needs are met? 7. Does the librarian close the transaction tactfully and make the user aware they are available should they require further assistance?
    • 11. Our DataDoes the librarian make full use of the available resources to meet the usersneeds? 2008 2009 2010Does Not Meet Expectations (1) - - 5 18% 1 3%Meets Expectations (2) 13 57% 7 25% 14 45%Exceeds Expectations (3) 10 43% 16 57% 16 52%Does the librarian seem at ease and take steps to make the usercomfortable? 2008 2009 2010Does Not Meet Expectations (1) 2 9% 1 4% -- 0%Meets Expectations (2) 15 65% 20 71% 25 81%Exceeds Expectations (3) 6 26% 7 25% 6 19%
    • 12. Closing the Loop Process1. Brainstorm possible problems.2. Select the problem to address.3. Brainstorm many possible solutions to the problem, and the resources needed for each solution.4. Select a strategy or strategies to implement.
    • 13. Our DataDoes the librarian make full use of the available resources to meet the usersneeds? 2008 2009 2010Does Not Meet Expectations (1) - - 5 18% 1 3%Meets Expectations (2) 13 57% 7 25% 14 45%Exceeds Expectations (3) 10 43% 16 57% 16 52%Does the librarian seem at ease and take steps to make the usercomfortable? 2008 2009 2010Does Not Meet Expectations (1) 2 9% 1 4% -- 0%Meets Expectations (2) 15 65% 20 71% 25 81%Exceeds Expectations (3) 6 26% 7 25% 6 19%
    • 14. Your Turn
    • 15. Our DataDoes the librarian make full use of the available resources to meet the usersneeds? 2008 2009 2010Does Not Meet Expectations (1) - - 5 18% 1 3%Meets Expectations (2) 13 57% 7 25% 14 45%Exceeds Expectations (3) 10 43% 16 57% 16 52%Does the librarian seem at ease and take steps to make the usercomfortable? 2008 2009 2010Does Not Meet Expectations (1) 2 9% 1 4% -- 0%Meets Expectations (2) 15 65% 20 71% 25 81%Exceeds Expectations (3) 6 26% 7 25% 6 19%
    • 16. Our SolutionLibrarian and Staff Training Manuals
    • 17. The Closed LoopDoes the librarian make full use of the available resources to meet the usersneeds? 2008 2009 2010 2011Does Not Meet Expectations (1) - 0% 5 18% 1 3% 1 3%Meets Expectations (2) 13 57% 7 25% 14 45% 21 53%Exceeds Expectations (3) 10 43% 16 57% 16 52% 18 45%Does the librarian seem at ease and take steps to make the user comfortable? 2008 2009 2010 2011Does Not Meet Expectations (1) 2 9% 1 4% - 0% - 0%Meets Expectations (2) 15 65% 20 71% 25 81% 24 60%Exceeds Expectations (3) 6 26% 7 25% 6 19% 16 40%
    • 18. Questions? Thank you!Adrianna Lancaster Chelsea Baker580.559.5368 580.559.5370alancaster@ecok.edu cbaker@ecok.edu library.ecok.edu