Surviving question 3 on paper 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Surviving question 3 on paper 2

on

  • 740 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
740
Views on SlideShare
634
Embed Views
106

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 106

http://ysgol-rhyngrwyd-igcse.wikispaces.com 103
https://ysgol-rhyngrwyd-igcse.wikispaces.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Surviving question 3 on paper 2 Surviving question 3 on paper 2 Presentation Transcript

  • Surviving question 3 on paper 2
  • One reason why we jumped to 2009
    • Having looked at all the available question 3’s, I see that the general plan seems to be changing:
    • For a start they want a title – no marks allocated but without it subsequent answers are down marked
    • So if you are asked for the title or for the question or issue you investigates – they mean the same thing:
  • Title/Question/Issue Examples
    • How does the character of the River _____ change downstream?
    • How does the character of ______ (town’s name) change from the CBD to the rural urban fringe?
    • Is there a link in _____ (town’s name) between the nature of the environment and the number of pedestrians?
    • Even if you are NOT basing it on something you have done yourself – please write something in the textbox NOW that is relevant.
  • Many of them then go on to ask for the aims or 2 aims or the purpose
    • Aims for river examples
    • to identify differences at three (or however many) sites on the River ______ that can be easily and safely reached
    • to measure the width, depth and velocity at all the sites (or whatever information you collected)
    • to determine why velocity changes downstream (possibly if that is what you did)
  • Many of them then go on to ask for the aims or 2 aims or the purpose
    • Aims for town examples
    • To identify X sites in _____ (town’s name) that demonstrate …… {e.g. different types of land use, are equally distributed sites between the CBD and the urban rural fringe etc )
    • To asses the pedestrians using each site
    • To assess the environmental quality of each site
    • To determine if there are links between ……. (list items that you are collecting data on)
    • Please write down aims that apply to yours.
  • There is also a difference between data collection and data presentation
    • Data collection is amassing the information – and do remember data is NOT just numbers, it is any information in the form of numbers, words and pictures, so these are the kind of thing that come under this heading. So …
  • Data collection for rivers
    • Secondary data: To locate suitable site, use of OS map to find for example where access to the river is possible, e.g. footpaths, bridges etc
    • base map of drainage basin
    • field sketches and/or sketch maps at each site – or photographs for annotation
    • measurement of ….. e.g. width, depth, gradient and wetted perimeter, velocity measurement across the channel and of the depth at each site
  • Data collection for towns
    • Secondary data: Google map in aerial view helped to choose representative sites – also house prices if relevant
    • base map of town, locating main roads, stations and important features and the sites chosen
    • sketch maps/field sketches at each site – or photograph for annotation
    • pedestrian counts
    • Information from environmental quality surveys
  • Data presentation however, is what you do with it in the context of your report
    • Data presentation for rivers
    • Annotated map of the area showing the survey points
    • Annotated field sketches/ maps or photographs
    • bar charts, pie charts, scaled cross-sections, scatter graphs (whichever are appropriate)
    • Mini-charts attached to the points of survey on a map of the river course - is a really good way of showing relationships between what you are measuring in relation to place
  • Data presentation however, is what you do with it in the context of your report
    • Data presentation for towns
    • Annotated map of the area showing the survey points
    • Annotated field sketches/ maps or photographs (to show environmental quality for example)
    • bar charts, pie charts, scaled cross-sections, scatter graphs (whichever are appropriate)
    • Mini-charts attached to the points of survey on a map of the town – is a really good way of showing relationships between what you are measuring in relation to place
  • What do I mean by mini charts?