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Affinity spacesste mxcon13
 

Affinity spacesste mxcon13

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Affinity Spaces as Learning Tools.

Affinity Spaces as Learning Tools.
Presented at STEMxCon 2013 presentation.

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    Affinity spacesste mxcon13 Affinity spacesste mxcon13 Presentation Transcript

    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Anity Spaces as Learning Tools 1
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide About Me 2(Gee, 2004) Doctoral Candidate: School Psychology @ University of Florida Specialization: Program Evaluation Minor: Research & Evaluation Methodology Dissertation (Pending): Motivation, Goal Orientation, and Academic Performance in Educational Games and Anity Spaces School Psychology Intern with Alachua County Public Schools (Gainesville, Florida area) Co/founder & CEO of Immersed Games (early ed tech startup)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 1 Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 1 Literature Review Community of Practice Affinity Space 2 Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 1 Literature Review Community of Practice Affinity Space 2 Research On Affinity Spaces for Learning 3 Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 1 Literature Review Community of Practice Affinity Space 2 Research On Affinity Spaces for Learning 3 Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 1 Literature Review Community of Practice Affinity Space 2 Research On Affinity Spaces for Learning 3 Examples from Case Studies & research 4 Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 1 Literature Review Community of Practice Affinity Space 2 Research On Affinity Spaces for Learning 3 Examples from Case Studies & research 4 Classroom Implementation Ideas & discussion for implementing Agenda 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Literature Review 4
    • Impacting the way people learn Children now learn frequently in informal settings Gee argues: Learning process is more ecient when the learning becomes part of a culture Learner becomes more involved with learning Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Technological Changes 5 if students think of themselves as scientists, how will this impact their practices? (Gee, 2004)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 6 “Groups of people who share a concern or passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.” Community of Practice (Wenger, 2009)
    • Learning is deeply tied to identity Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Identity within a Community of Practice 7 Becoming Skillful Developing an Identity+ one process membership motivates & provides meaning (Lave, 1991)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 8 1 Problems Applying Community of Practice “Community” has connotations of belonging & personal ties (not necessarily accurate) 2 “Community” implies people are ‘members’ (not necessarily anymore) 3 “Community of Practice” term broadly used (makes organizing research dicult) to online spaces (Cox, 2005; Gee, 2005; Hayes & Duncan, 2012)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 9 Online environment where people are organized around a common endeavor or interest. Anity Spaces (Gee, 2004)
    • Tropf - Defense Slide Anity Space Generator Content Portals people engage with content through (such as forums) for the content to be about (such as the game) 10(Gee, 2005)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 11(Gee, 2005) Common endeavor, not race, class, gender, or disability, is primary. 1
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 12(Gee, 2005) Newbies and masters and everyone else share common space. 2
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 13(Gee, 2005) Some portals are strong generators. 3
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 14(Gee, 2005) Content organization is transformed by interactional organization. 4 content often changed based on portal discussions students get a real impact
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 15(Gee, 2005) Both intensive and extensive knowledge are encouraged. 5
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 16(Gee, 2005) Both individual and distributed knowledge are valued. 6
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 17(Gee, 2005) Dispersed knowledge is encouraged. 7
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 18(Gee, 2005) Tacit knowledge is used and honored. 8
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 19(Gee, 2005) There are many dierent forms and routes to participation. 9
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 20(Gee, 2005) There are lots of dierent routes to status. 10
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Features of Anity Spaces 21(Gee, 2005) Leadership is porous and leaders are resources. 11
    • Extension of spaces onto social media Anyone can publish, create a new portal, become a generator Participation multimodal: videos, user art, podcasts, etc. Increased expectation for this type of sharing Even more distributed knowledge - multiple portals Socializing important (doesn’t all have to be on the endeavor) Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Impact of Social Media 22(Lammers et al., 2012) also lets new members engage with low risk
    • Characteristics of anity spaces often not present in classrooms (or more weakly present than online) Digital natives have access to many anity spaces Dierent, and possibly more powerful, way to learn & have identity, with anyone developing skills & becoming a leader Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Anity Spaces & Classrooms 23 “What these young people see in school may pale by comparison” -Gee (Gee, 2004; Gee, 2005; Squire, 2008)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Research 24
    • Most research case studies & individual observation such as in ethnography and qualitative research Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Quick Summary 25 Fields & Kafai (2007) observed students playing game together learned by asking questions of strangers or club members in game or helping each other oine Davies (2006) found learning is social, motivated, embedded in the participant’s life, enjoyable, and compelling social patterns around sharing information development of literacy around games & spaces Steinkuehler and King (2009) at-risk boys playing game used literacy for problem solving, researched and created resources, and synthesized information Thomas (2005) students spent hours improving literacy to improve engagement online Steinkuehler and Duncan (2008) found most posts for game reflected scientific literacy
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Examples 26
    • Looked at learning through online photography space Concluded learning taking place was: Social Motivated Embedded in participant’s life Enjoyable Compelling Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Online Learning Site 27(Davies, 2006)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 28
    • Observed online role-playing & fan fiction around Middle Earth Literature behavior was the most highly valued form of participation & ability in community Students spent hours improving literacy in order to improve their abilities in the online space A student explained that since his character was supposed to sound intelligent, he spent lots of time studying how to improve his English - in books, society, articulate people Students didn’t think of their community as being a ‘learning community’ Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Tolkein Fan-Fiction 29(Thomas, 2005)
    • After School Program with World of Warcraft for at-risk boys develop literacy practices using forums Observed students: using literacy for problem-solving researching creating multi-modal game resources online synthesized information over multiple resources Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide After-School with WoW 30(Steinkuehler & King, 2009)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 31
    • Coding WoW forum posts on scientific literacy framework 86% of posts included “social knowledge construction” Most (65%) also had evidence of evaluative epistemology (i.e. treating knowledge as open-ended process of evaluation and argument) Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Examining WoW Forum Posts 32(Steinkuehler & Duncan, 2008) used systems based reasoning 58% of posts built on others’ ideas 37% of posts used counter-arguments 37% of posts used data and evidence 28% of posts model-based reasoning 11% of posts
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 33 does calculations on data experiments draws conclusions
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Classroom Implementation 34
    • Anity spaces can be online or oine Try to think in terms of these types of interactions Can you adopt these? Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Make Your Classroom Like an Anity Space 35 common endeavor is primary encourages intensive and extensive knowledge many dierent forms and routes to participation newbies and masters and everyone else share common space encourages individual and distributed knowledge lots of dierent routes to status some portals are strong generators encouraged dispersed knowledge leadership is porous and leaders are resources content organization is transformed by interactional organization uses and honors tacit knowledge (Gee, 2005)
    • Remember: Encouraging distributed/specialized knowledge for projects Multiple ways to contribute Multiple ways to leadership (which is fluid) Encouraging identity with the subject Can create an informal learning space in the classroom 8th Grade Language Arts Class Example District 504 around Hunger Games to explore utopian/ dystopia societies, connect with current events (eg: women’s rights for education), “grati” wall, digital media beliefs Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Make Your Classroom Like an Anity Space 36
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 37 dystopian utopian student-created digital art on social issues (Bruozas, 2013)
    • Classroom Wikipedia Use existing anity space for students to engage in Find an online portal for your area for students to contribute to -- or even in person in your local community Example: Maker Culture (one portal: http:// makerfaire.com) Create your own online forum with assignments students post to it -- all of your classes can interact together, or even pair with multiple teachers Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Using Online Spaces 38
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide 39
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Tools for Creating a Portal 40 Name URL About Edmodo https://www.edmodo.com Free social learning system Wikispaces http://www.wikispaces.com Free Wiki creating for teachers Free Forums http://www.freeforums.org Free forums with lots of features (advertising supported) ActiveBoard http://activeboard.com Easy forums with unlimited user free plan (advertising supported, $8/mo to remove) Lefora http://www.lefora.com Simple free forum, also ad supported or ad removal
    • Students who didn’t use an online portal said it was because: “I felt that I had nothing to contribute.” “I find it’s not a very useful way to get answers.” “I didn’t really need to.” If you want participation, may need to guide at first Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide Practical Notes 41(Moore & Iida, 2010)
    • Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide DISCUSSION ? 42
    • Beavis, C., Apperley, T., Bradford, C., O’Mara, J., & Walsh, C. (2009). Literacy in the digital age: Learning from computer games. English in Education, 43(2), 162–175. doi:10.1111/j. 1754-8845.2009.01035.x Bruozas, M. (2013). Anity spaces at Gray school - Engaging and connected learning! Retrieved http://ccap-team.blogspot.com/2013/03/anity-spaces-at-gray-school- engaging.html Cox, A. (2005). What are communities of practice? A comparative review of four seminal works. Journal of Information Science, 31(6), 527–540. doi:10.1177/0165551505057016 Davies, J. (2006). Anities and beyond! Developing ways of seeing in online spaces. E- Learning, 3(2), 217. doi:10.2304/elea.2006.3.2.217 DeVane, B. (2012). Whither membership? Identity and social learning in anity spaces. In E. R. Hayes & S. C. Duncan (Eds.), Learning in Video Game Anity Spaces (pp. 162–185). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. Fields, D. A., & Kafai, Y. B. (2007). Tracing insider knowledge across time and spaces: A connective ethnography in a teen online game world, 199–208. Gee, J. P. (2004). Situated Language and Learning: A Critique of Traditional Schooling. New York, NY: Routledge. Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide References 43
    • Gee, J. P. (2005). Semiotic social spaces and anity spaces. In Beyond Communities of Practice (pp. 214–232). Cambridge: Cambridge UP. Hayes, E. R., & Duncan, S. C. (2012). Expanding the Anity Space. In Learning in Video Game Anity Spaces (pp. 1–22). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. King, E. M. (2010). Exploring intersections between online and oine anity space participation (pp. 486–487). Presented at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences, International Society of the Learning Sciences. Lammers, J. C., Curwood, J. S., & Magnifico, A. M. (2012). Toward an anity space methodology: Considerations for literacy research. English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 11(2), 44–58. Lave, J. (1991). Situating learning in communities of practice. Perspectives on Socially Shared Cognition, 2, 63–82. Moore, K., & Iida, S. (2010). Students’ perception of supplementary, online activities for Japanese language learning: Groupwork, quiz, and discussion tools. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26(7), 966-979. Steinkuehler, C., & Duncan, S. (2008). Scientific Habits of Mind in Virtual Worlds. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 17(6), 530–543. doi:10.1007/s10956-008-9120-8 Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide References 44
    • Steinkuehler, C., & King, E. (2009). Digital literacies for the disengaged: creating after school contexts to support boys' game-based literacy skills. On the Horizon, 17(1), 47–59. doi:10.1108/10748120910936144 Steinkuehler, C., Compton-Lilly, C., & King, E. (2010). Reading in the context of online games, 222–229. Presented at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences. Squire, K. (2008). Critical education in an interactive age. Mirror Images: Popular Culture and Education, 105–125. Squire, K. (2011). Video Games and Learning: Teaching and Participatory Culture in the Digital Age. New York: Teachers College Press. Thomas, A. (2005). Children online: learning in a virtual community of practice. E- Learning and Digital Media, 2(1), 27–38. Wenger, E. (2000). Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems. Organization, 7(2), 225–246. doi:10.1177/135050840072002 Wenger, E. (2009, January 31). Communities of practice: a brief introduction. Ewenger.com. Retrieved January 12, 2013, from http://www.ewenger.com/theory/ Tropf - Anity Spaces Slide References 45