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Ems - Summer I '11 - T101 Lecture 7: Networked Individualism
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Ems - Summer I '11 - T101 Lecture 7: Networked Individualism

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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8StRAJCork
  • social organization no longer fits the little-boxes model. Work, community and domesticity have moved from hierarchically arranged, densely knit, bounded groups (“little boxes”) to social networks
  • A social network is a social structure made up of individuals (or organizations) called "nodes", which are tied (connected) by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, kinship, common interest, financial exchange, dislike, sexual relationships, or relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige. A social network is a social structure made up of individuals (or organizations) called "nodes", which are tied (connected) by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, kinship, common interest, financial exchange, dislike, sexual relationships, or relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige.
  • Start video at 5:54. Stop when scene at bowling alley endshe frequency and supportiveness of interpersonal contact before the Internet was non-linearly associated with residential (and workplace) distance. Under the “little boxes” model people are socially and cognitively encapsulated by homogeneous, broadly-embracing groups. Members of traditional little-box societies deal principally with fellow members of the few groups to which they belong: at home, in the neighborhood, at work, or in voluntary organizations. They work in a discrete work group within a single organization; they live in a household in a neighborhood; they are members of one or two kinship groups; and they participate in structured voluntary organizations: churches, bowling leagues, etc.
  • networked societies, boundaries are more permeable, interactions are with diverse others, linkages switch between multiple networks, and hierarchies are both flatter and more complexly structured.
  • http://www.strimoo.com/video/17213876/Dog-Talking-With-Its-Owner-on-Skype-Metacafe.html,
  • CBS digital family video
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome to Summer
      T101 Day 7
    • 2. Barry Wellman – Sociologist of Social Networks
      University of Toronto
      He studies the shift from group-centered relations to networked individualism.
    • 3. What do we mean by social network?
    • 4. neighborhood
      church
      bowling league
    • 5.
    • 6.
    • 7.
    • 8.
    • 9. Gone are the days of the family business
    • 10.
    • 11. Doggie hotels offer skype
    • 12.
    • 13.
    • 14.
    • 15.
    • 16.
    • 17.
    • 18. Barry Wellman’s take home point:
      Social closeness does not mean physical closeness.

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