May 18-24 Temple
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May 18-24 Temple

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Our little Church is using a Chronological Bible Reading Schedule by Skip Andrews. It can be found here: http://www.churchofchristduluthga.org/ ...

Our little Church is using a Chronological Bible Reading Schedule by Skip Andrews. It can be found here: http://www.churchofchristduluthga.org/
Each Sunday a lesson is given from some of that week's reading. This lesson covers May 18-24.

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May 18-24 Temple May 18-24 Temple Presentation Transcript

  • Commentary
    • All the commentary in this lesson, unless otherwise stated,
    • is taken from:
    • The Word in Life TM
    • Study Bible
  • Psalm 127
    • Psalms 127:1 NET If the LORD does not build a house, then those who build it work in vain. If the LORD does not guard a city, then the watchman stands guard in vain.
  • Psalm 127
    • 2 It is vain for you to rise early, come home late, and work so hard for your food. Yes, he can provide for those whom he loves even when they sleep.
  • Psalm 127
    • 3 Yes, sons are a gift from the LORD, the fruit of the womb is a reward. 4 Sons born during one's youth are like arrows in a warrior's hand.
  • Psalm 127
    • 5 How blessed is the man who fills his quiver with them! They will not be put to shame when they confront enemies at the city gate.
  • Building and Prospering in the Lord
    • How much of our life depends on us, and how much depends on God? This psalm reminds us that while human effort is important, ultimately we need to place our confidence in the Lord. Nowhere is that more apparent than in the home and with our children.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • Psalm 127 links the welfare of the family to the welfare of the city, and also connects both of them to God. God is the ultimate source of strength to home builders and city planners alike.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • Those who build their house according to God's power and wisdom will have the heritage of children who can "speak with their enemies in the gate," or public arena.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • One implication of this psalm is that God's people belong in the public sector. In fact, the objective of raising Godly children is to produce godly people who will be involved in public discourse.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • However, there is a vast difference between ancient Israel in Solomon's day and the pluralistic society of today.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • Modern-day believers face tensions unknown to the ancient Israelites, particularly when it comes to raising their children.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • For example, should they educate their young people in the public sector, which has become increasingly secular and at times unruly, or should they seek alternative schooling?
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • There are no hard and fast answers to this question. In the end, parents must do what they believe is best for their children and right before the Lord.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • There are reasons why a godly family might withdraw its children from public schooling. One of the most important is that children are a valued heritage from the Lord.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • Yet that could also be a reason to remain involved in the public system: children are a heritage—not just one's own children, but all children.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • God's people have a civic duty to be a part of the public debate about schooling, however they decide the question for their own children. There is no place for believers to withdraw from the world.
  • Protecting Your Heritage
    • Scripture calls us to engage our "enemies [and presumably our friends] in the gate." The involvement of Christians in the public arena is a complex issue.
  • Children—A Blessing, Not A Burden
    • The modern world tends to send mixed messages about the value of children, but the Bible is unequivocal in its affirmation that children are a blessing from the Lord and a source of happiness for parents.
  • Children—A Blessing, Not A Burden
    • This biblical view stands in contrast to modern thinking, which slowly but surely has come to regard children as a burden on families and communities, rather than a blessing.
  • Children—A Blessing, Not A Burden
    • Scripture is not blind to the realities of raising children. In fact, it faithfully records many of the difficulties inherent in bringing children into the world. Nevertheless, the Bible insists that children are ultimately a heritage and a reward from God.
  • Psalm 128
    • Psalms 128:1 NET How blessed is every one of the LORD's loyal followers, each one who keeps his commands!
  • Psalm 128
    • 2 You will eat what you worked so hard to grow. You will be blessed and secure.
  • Psalm 128
    • 3 Your wife will be like a fruitful vine in the inner rooms of your house; your children will be like olive branches, as they sit all around your table.
  • Psalm 128
    • 4 Yes indeed, the man who fears the LORD will be blessed in this way. 5 May the LORD bless you from Zion, that you might see Jerusalem prosper all the days of your life,
  • Psalm 128
    • 6 and that you might see your grandchildren. May Israel experience peace!
  • Happiness in Daily Life
    • Most people long for happiness. Psalm 128 shows that the way to have it is to fear the Lord and walk with Him. The psalm paints a picture of peace and security in the most basic areas of life—work and family.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • Do you ever experience tension between your work and your family life? Most people do. Yet ironically, work and family are two of God's primary callings for us. And often find them side by side in Scripture.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • Since the beginning of history, work and family have been the two realms in which people have tended to find both the greatest meaning and fulfillment and the deepest pain and frustration.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • The Bible reflects this paradox by opening with the painfully realistic account of Adam and Eve. On the one hand, their work in the garden and their life with each other brought them great joy and significance.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • But after they sinned, work became "sweat", and family life produced pain, sorrow, and estrangement. The biblical account goes on to record more stress between work and family in the life of Abraham.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • Abraham used his wife Sarah as a bargaining chip as he negotiated for food with the Egyptians. Later, he and his nephew Lot achieved so much wealth that they had to part ways in order to maintain a peaceful relationship!
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • Another prime example of frustration in work and family is Solomon. His success as a king was spectacular, but his family life was not, affected as it was by the many political marriages he made.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • In the end, he found both his work and family to be very unsatisfying, even though he believed that both were gifts from God to be treasured.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • Psalms 127 and 128 hold out hope for these areas as well. By centering our work in the Lord, we can find a measure of fulfillment and reward. Likewise, family life can be satisfying and secure when we build our homes on a godly foundation.
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • As you think about the connections between your family and work, how much do the members of your family know about your work?
  • Work And Family: 2 Great Callings, 1 Great Conflict
    • How much do you know about theirs? In what ways could your church help to bridge the gap between work and family life?
  • David’s Final Words to Solomon
    • 1 Kings 2:1 NET When David was close to death, he told Solomon his son: 2 “I am about to die. Be strong and become a man .
  • David’s Final Words to Solomon
    • Do the job the LORD your God has assigned you by following his instructions and obeying his rules, commandments, regulations, and laws as written in the law of Moses.
  • David’s Final Words to Solomon
    • Then you will succeed in all you do and seek to accomplish, 4 and the LORD will fulfill his promise to me,
  • David’s Final Words to Solomon
    • 'If your descendants watch their step and live faithfully in my presence with all their heart and being, then,' he promised, 'you will not fail to have a successor on the throne of Israel.'
  • David’s Final Words to Solomon
    • David's charge to Solomon is, to keep the charge of the Lord. The authority of a dying father is much, but nothing to that of a living God. God promised David that the Messiah should come from his descendants, and that promise was absolute;
  • David’s Final Words to Solomon
    • but the promise, that there should not fail of them a man on the throne of Israel, was conditional; if he walks before God in sincerity, with zeal and resolution: in order hereunto, he must take heed to his way. (MHCC)
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • Solomon immediately is forced to defend his kingship, and again it is Adonijah’s intent to grab it away.
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • This time Adonijah is crafty and approaches the King’s mother Bathsheba to do his dirty work.
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • He asks Bathsheba to ask Solomon for their father’s virgin concubine Abishag to be given as his wife.
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • Solomon received Bathsheba with all the respect that was owing to a mother; but let none be asked for that which they ought not to grant.
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • It ill becomes a good man to prefer a bad request, or to appear in a bad cause. According to eastern customs it was plain that Adonijah sought to be king, by his asking for Abishag as his wife,
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • and Solomon could not be safe while he lived. Ambitious, turbulent spirits commonly prepare death for themselves. Many a head has been lost by catching at a crown. (MHCC)
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • 1 Kings 2:22 NET King Solomon answered his mother, "Why just request Abishag the Shunammite for him?
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • Since he is my older brother, you should also request the kingdom for him, for Abiathar the priest, and for Joab son of Zeruiah!"
  • Solomon Defends His Kingship
    • 23 King Solomon then swore an oath by the LORD, "May God judge me severely, if Adonijah does not pay for this request with his life!
  • Building The Temple
    • We read this week how Solomon built the Temple and his palace. God’s hand was truly involved in the work.
  • Building The Temple
    • How else could craftsmen of that era chisel out stones so perfectly that there were never sounds of hammers, chisels or any other tools at the Temple site?
  • The Temple’s Dedication
    • Let’s join the dedication service for the Temple. Here is part of Solomon’s prayer.
    • 1 Kings 8:37 NET "The time will come when the land suffers from a famine, a plague, blight and disease,
  • The Temple’s Dedication
    • or a locust invasion, or when their enemy lays siege to the cities of the land, or when some other type of plague or epidemic occurs.
  • The Temple’s Dedication
    • 38 When all your people Israel pray and ask for help, as they acknowledge their pain and spread out their hands toward this temple,
  • The Temple’s Dedication
    • 39 then listen from your heavenly dwelling place, forgive their sin, and act favorably toward each one based on your evaluation of his motives.
  • The Temple’s Dedication
    • (Indeed you are the only one who can correctly evaluate the motives of all people.)
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • God cares about the personal needs of each believer. Solomon's prayer of dedication is a passage of Scripture that especially supports belief in a personal, loving God.
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • Solomon realized that the temple at Jerusalem was a place of prayer—not only a place in which people would pray, but also a place toward which people would pray.
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • The temple would be a representation of God's presence on earth. So when people prayed toward Jerusalem, they would be doing so in order to pray to the Lord.
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • When would people be likely to lift up their prayers? Surely when they experienced trouble—famine, pestilence, blight, and other plagues and sicknesses.
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • But it was not just general calamity that would move a person to turn to the Lord, but one's personal needs as well, “ the plague of his own heart ” (most older translations) as Solomon put It.
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • It's an intriguing thought—a plague of one's own, the point at which the trouble, pain, and sorrow of a fallen world intersect with a person's own heart and life. In that moment, when one "spreads out his hands" toward the Lord, God hears.
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • What is the plague of your heart? What trouble binds your soul so that you have nowhere else to turn but toward God?
  • A Plague Of Your Own
    • Are you willing to lift up your prayers to Him? His presence is abiding, and He has promised to hear your cry. Why not enter into His presence right now?
  • Drawing Near to God in Enduring Faith
    • Hebrews 10:19 NET Therefore, brothers and sisters, since we have confidence to enter the sanctuary by the blood of Jesus ,
  • Drawing Near to God in Enduring Faith
    • 20 by the fresh and living way that he inaugurated for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh,
  • Drawing Near to God in Enduring Faith
    • 21 and since we have a great priest over the house of God, 22 let us draw near with a sincere heart in the assurance that faith brings,
  • Drawing Near to God in Enduring Faith
    • because we have had our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed in pure water.
  • Drawing Near to God in Enduring Faith
    • As repentant, baptized believers, we have access to God The Father through Jesus, God The Son.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • 1 Kings 8:41 NET “Foreigners, who do not belong to your people Israel, will come from a distant land because of your reputation.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • 42 When they hear about your great reputation and your ability to accomplish mighty deeds, they will come and direct their prayers toward this temple.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • 43 Then listen from your heavenly dwelling place and answer all the prayers of the foreigners.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • Then all the nations of the earth will acknowledge your reputation, obey you like your people Israel do, and recognize that this temple I built belongs to you.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • Solomon's prayer of dedication for the temple at Jerusalem showed that Israel's God was a God for all nations. The king anticipated that foreigners from all over the world would be drawn to the house of worship.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • So he asked God to honor their prayers in order that "all peoples of the earth may know Your name and fear You."
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • One early answer to Solomon's prayer was a visit by the queen of Sheba, who had heard of the splendors of Solomon's kingdom but wanted to see them for herself.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • After reviewing his accomplishments, she praised God for what he had done for Israel. Other visitors had similar reactions.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • The temple was located at Jerusalem, but as Jesus pointed out, (quoting Isaiah), it was meant to be " a house of prayer for all nations ."
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • Likewise, Israel was to be a blessing to the nations and a light showing the way toward the one true God.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • Similarly, Jesus teaches His followers to be a light to the nations. Rather than bringing people to a central place of worship, believers—who are themselves temples of the Holy Spirit
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • are to go to the ends of the earth, taking the good news of God's grace to all the peoples of the world.
  • A House Of Prayer For All Nations
    • 2 Chronicles 6:14 NET and prayed: "O LORD God of Israel, there is no god like you in heaven or on earth! You maintain covenantal loyalty to your servants who obey you with sincerity.
  • A God We Can Count On
    • As Solomon began his prayer of dedication of the temple, he described the Lord as the God who keeps covenant and mercy.
  • A God We Can Count On
    • This was a bedrock belief for the Israelites—that they worshiped a God who could be counted on to keep His promises.
  • A God We Can Count On
    • 2 Chronicles 6:18 NET “ God does not really live with humankind on the earth! Look, if the sky and the highest heaven cannot contain you, how much less this temple I have built!
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • Have you ever been tempted to think of a church building as either more or less important than it really is? Solomon's prayer of dedication helps us gain a proper perspective on how to view houses of worship.
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • On the one hand, Solomon's temple was just a building. As such, it could not possibly contain the Lord. On the other hand, it was a site which God had chosen to bless with His presence.
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • Thus the temple became a hallowed symbol that stood for God. By the time of Jesus, however, people had distorted Solomon's balanced perspective.
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • Some treated the temple as more than a building. Whereas Solomon's temple was dedicated as a house of prayer for all nations, the temple of Jesus' day
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • restricted Gentiles to an outer court, called the Court of the Gentiles. Notices in Greek and Latin were posted to warn Gentiles that they risked death if they trespassed into the inner courts.
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • On the other hand, some treated the temple as less than a house of prayer. Jesus strongly criticized the money changers for turning the site into a "den of thieves," and He rebuked the Pharisees for their lack of respect for what the temple symbolized.
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • It helps to keep these errors in mind as we think about the significance and symbolism of church buildings today. Like the temple, no church structure can lay sole claim to being the house of God.
  • A Building, More Or Less
    • At the same time, church buildings and what goes on in them are intended to point to God. So how we treat these sanctuaries in many ways reveals our attitude toward God.
    • In all we do, do it all according to God’s will. We know it is God’s will to hear His Word, believe and confess Jesus is the Christ,
    • repent of our sins and have them washed away when we’re buried with Jesus in baptism. Then we must be willing to faithfully serve him all the days of our lives.