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Dalai lama delhi_dialogue_05_jan2011
 

Dalai lama delhi_dialogue_05_jan2011

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  • a place called Dadaab, near the Somali border in Kenya. To give you some context, Dadaab houses 300,000 people in a space designed for less than half that number. It’s in a hot, dusty corner of Kenya where there is a shortage of nearly everything, including water and firewood. But in the middle of Dadaab, there’s something exciting happening.
  • there’s a satelitte dish. And inside the center,
  • There’s a computer center. And next to that center,
  • The global distribution of wealth looks like a champagne glass. The bottom 80% hold less than 30% of global wealth. Four billion people, over half of the people we share the planet with, live on under $3 a day, in 2005 American dollars. Martin Luther King Jr. said he had the audacity to believe that people everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality and freedom for their spirits. Poverty -- systemic, entrenched poverty, generally in developing countries -- is the greatest moral challenge of our time. So, then, how can we make the biggest dent on poverty given limited resources? Do we build roads or schools? Do we give poor people loans? Do we pursue structural changes or tap natural resources?
  • Here’s a picture of Henry Ford’s assembly line, the biggest poverty alleviator of the last century. Ford’s innovation did something amazing -- it took the production of a highly complex machine, the automobile, and broke it down into small tasks that any person with a bit of training could do. Ford’s assembly lines were human-powered. He saw that the biggest natural resource on the planet isn’t oil, or diamonds, or lithium. It’s humans. Ford paved the way for the post-war economic boom in the United States, and indeed, his concepts underpin most modern factories, which have brought millions of people out of poverty in places like coastal China.
  • The organization I founded, Samasource, takes Ford’s thinking to the digital age. We realized that there is a huge amount of data in the world, and companies spend a lot of time and energy compiling it, cleaning it up, adding to it, and selling it. Most of this process is very simple, involving basic internet searches, or data entry. At the same time, one and a half billion people now speak English. Ninety percent of the planet is thought to be literate. We are living in the age of talent surplus. So we thought, what if we could take the process of improving data and break it down into little pieces? Then, anyone with a computer and internet access could do the work, from even the poorest corners of the world.
  • So we built a technology system to bring digital work to the world’s poor. Here’s how it works.
  • a group of Samasource partners built a small computer center to train people to do basic outsourcing work. They started with about 30 trainees, all youth from the local community. And then they realized all these trainees were capable of doing work. Since March this year, Samasource has provided this computer center with enough contracts to employ over 100 people.
  • One of them is Mamta Devi, who I met this February. Mamta is in her late twenties. She has a few children and married young. Most women from Mamta’s background have never worked in an office before, and the idea of doing skilled work behind a computer is unimaginable. Now, thanks to Samasource, Mamta is the primary breadwinner in her family. Her biggest problem is her husband’s friends, who tease him that his wife earns more than he does. Her community recognizes her as a wage-earner. In a culture in which rural women are often sold into brothels, Mamta’s father-in-law watches her kids because he realizes the importance of her income. Most critically, Mamta’s perception of herself has changed. She told us one afternoon: empowerment is not in books. It is in work.

Dalai lama delhi_dialogue_05_jan2011 Dalai lama delhi_dialogue_05_jan2011 Presentation Transcript

  • DADAAB , KENYA
  • SATELLITE DISH
  • IFO COMPUTER CENTER , DADAAB
  • PAUL PARACH
  • GHANA >
  • ASSEMBLY LINE, 1913
  • sama source
  • client sends samasource a project 1010100010101010101010110010101001010100100000100101100101111000010100101010001010101010101011001010100101010100010101010101010110010101001010101001010010101010101001001100101010100011111010101010101010100101010001010101010101011001010100101010010000010010110010111100001010010101001010010101010101001001100101010100011111010101010101010100101010110 101010001010101010101011001010100101010010000010010110010111100001010010101001010010101010100100110010101010001111101010101010101010010101 1 work is allocated to our service partners 3 101010101010100101010110010100 samasource breaks it down into microwork 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 2 101010101010100101010110010100 4 women, youth, and refugees complete work samasource compiles work and assures quality 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 101010101010100101010110010100 5 project gets delivered and helps reduce poverty 6
  •  
  • DIGITAL WORK IN DHARAMSALA
  • “ I love working on computers...I am able to learn more about the world and at the same time, I get paid.” Lhakyi Kelsang “ I love working on computers...I am able to learn more about the world and at the same time, I get paid.” Lhakyi Kelsang “ I would like to tell His Holiness that this program can work in most Tibetan settlements in India and would be able to make a great impact in solving some of the problems of unemployment.” Lobsang Gyatso “ I love working on computers...I am able to learn more about the world and at the same time, I get paid.” Lhakyi Kelsang “ I would like to tell His Holiness that if this program can be expanded, it will help to solve a lot of the unemployment problems that we have. Also at the same time, it will give lot of unemployed youth something to work and people will be able to spend their time constructively.” Ngawang Gyaltsen
  • give work.