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Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
Data Logging Report
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Data Logging Report

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  • 1. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY FACULTY OF SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS SULTAN IDRIS EDUCATION UNIVERSITY Information And Communication Technology In Science (SSI 3013) TITLE : REPORT ON DATA LOGGING PREPARED FOR: ENCIK AZMI BIN IBRAHIM PREPARED BY:1. VIVIANA VELENTHIA MICHEAL D201010XXXXX2. DAYANG SUFINAH BINTI DATU TENG D201010XXXXX3. DARVINA LIM CHOO KHENG D201010XXXXX SEMESTER 1 SESSION 2012/2013 GROUP B 1
  • 2. CONTENTSCover 1Contents 2Acknowledgement 3 1. Introduction 4 2. Engage 5 3. Empower 5 4. Enhance 13 5. Unique Features of This Activity 14 6. Conclusion 14References 16Appendix 17 2
  • 3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTWe would like to thanks our lecturer, En. Azmi Ibrahim for his valuable advices that he gaveduring the process of preparing the report that titled “Report On Data Logging” and thepresentation on Data Logging. The advices truly help us a lot in the preparation process ofthis report and the presentation. In addition, we would like to thank Prof Rosly Jaafar and the seniors inelectromagnetic lab for letting us conduct the experiment in the lab and the advices givenwhen we conduct the experiment. Besides that, we would also like to show our appreciation to our classmates that gavesuggestions during the process of preparing this report and presentation. Next, we would alsolike to thanks our friends that share their ideas, thoughts and give suggestions to us. In conclusion, we would like to thanks to everyone that involve directly or indirectlyin the process of preparing this report and presentation. 3
  • 4. 1 INTRODUCTION„How science works‟ can be a difficult topic to tackle in a meaningful and interesting way.As Cleaves and Toplist have identified , high stakes assessment seems to have led to pupilscarrying out a limited range of investigations in which they see little benefit. „How scienceworks‟ runs the risk of being a long list of disjointed facts or competences that are abstract inpupils‟ minds and are poorly understood and remembered. Data logging is a fantastic way tocollect real data, quickly, for the whole class to see. One way to use it is to set up anexperiment on the front bench with the data logger connected to the teacher‟s PC and displaya chart using the data projector. It allows you and the class to focus attention on the scientificquestions that lead to the development of more reliable data and a better understanding ofwhat is going on. It is quick, visible to all and the chart builds while the experiment is inprogress. The research of Hanley suggests a need for greater use of interactive techniques toelicit student contributions. This approach provides an unrivalled opportunity for pupils todiscuss both physics and measurement and to develop and refine an investigation. Whereaspupils boiling a beaker of water, recording a table of results and plotting a graph can take awhole lesson, logging and charting the temperature of a kettle of water can be done in fiveminutes. Then the chart can be discussed, a hypothesis formed and a follow-up experimentcarried out in a further ten minutes. The spotlight can move from the measurements to theexplanation or the investigation. Often, in pupil experiments, the interpretation of results isneglected by pupils who have spent the whole lesson collecting data: they have simply runout of time. This particularly affects the less able or less confident ones. Data logging is also ideal for gathering multiple sets of data concurrently in real time,something that is not possible in traditional school experiments. For instance, you canmeasure the temperature of the water and the air inside a kettle, the outside surfacetemperature and the noise made by cavitation. Then you can relate the measurements to eachother. Best of all, the whole thing can be done in less than ten minutes. By distributing thecharts electronically you can quickly provide engaging homework that is thought provoking,highly diagnostic and quick to mark. It can also provide a framework for personalizedlearning around a common task. Data logging composed of 3 important items which arecomputer, data logger and sensor. 4
  • 5. 2 ENGAGEEngage is the first step taken to unearth information and existing knowledge of the studentson the topic that we will experiment. For example, we want to carry out the experimentrelated to the effects of angle to acceleration and velocity. The first will show photo relatedangle, acceleration and velocity. In this example, we show a picture of people cycling uphilland downhill. After they looked into the picture, question “Which cycler is faster and easy” isasked to the students. From their answers, we can find out their prior knowledge about theissue, after that we should explain the real condition follow by next step to prove ourexplanation. In this stage also, problem statement is created: “Does the inclined track with a certain angle affect the acceleration and velocity of a moving object?”3 EMPOWERThis stage is the planning and doing stage in our experiment. We carry out an experimentusing data logger (motion sensor) to test the problem statement.Title :Acceleration And Velocity - Cart on an inclined track with different anglesObjective To investigate how the acceleration and velocity of an object down an inclined tract depends on the angle of the inclined tract by using the motion sensor. Determine the angle of the inclined track for each different height, h Use the software to plot the graph of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time for each trial.IntroductionAcceleration is the rate of change in an object‟s velocity. Since velocity is the speed anddirection of an object‟s motion, acceleration can mean speeding up, slowing down, orchanging direction. Constant acceleration occurs when an object experiences a constant netforce. Constant acceleration means that an object‟s velocity is constantly changing, but at auniform rate. For inclined track with higher angle, the acceleration of the moving object willcertainly higher but constant value; thus the velocity that depends on the acceleration willalso increase. 5
  • 6. TheoryA cart on an inclined tract will roll down the tract as it is pulled by gravity. The direction ofthe acceleration due to gravity is straight down as shown in the diagram. The component ofthe acceleration due to gravity which is parallel to the inclined surface is g sin θ where θ isthe angle of the inclined tract. Neglecting friction, g sin θ is the acceleration of the cart.Equipments and materials Computer with USB port PASPORT motion sensor PASPORT USB interface Data Studio software Track 6
  • 7. Cart Retort stand and clamp RulerProcedureComputer setup 1. The PASPORT USB interface is plugged into the computer‟s USB port. 2. The motion sensor is plugged in into the USB interface. The PASPortal window is automatically launched. 3. Appropriate DataStudio configuration is chosen.Equipment setup1. The equipment is set up as shown in figure.2. The height of the point of release of the cart from table surface is measured. Different heights (8cm, 12cm and 16cm) are used in this experiment. The length of the track is also measured to obtain the inclined angle. Length of track, l Height, h 7
  • 8. 3. The motion sensor is placed at the raised end of the track so it can measure the motion of the cart as it moves down the inclined track. At the top of the motion sensor, the icon „Cart‟ is selected.4. Cart is hold at the mark “15cm” of the track. When it is released, the data is recorded. The experiment is repeated by changing the height to 12cm and 16 cm to obtain 3 sets of data.Record Data1. The button Start is clicked and the cart is released so that it moves down the track.2. The button Stop is clicked before the cart hits the end stop of the track.Analyze dataVelocity graphThe smooth part of the velocity is highlighted. Then, linear fit is selectedfrom the fit menu. The slope (the value of m) for the cart is then recorded.Acceleration graphThe flat part of the acceleration is highlighted. Then, linear fit is selectedfrom the fit menu. The slope (the value of m) for the cart is then recorded.The value for the slope of the velocity to the mean of acceleration is compared. 8
  • 9. Result/dataLength of track, h 85cm 85cm 85cmHeight, y 8cm 12cm 16cmAngle of inclined track, θ 5.4° 8.1° 10.8°Acceleration (slope = 0) 0.6m/s2 1.0m/s2 1.2m/s2 Velocity 0.43m/s2 0.80m/s2 1.17m/s2 Slope of graph, (m) Acceleration 0.0m/s3 0.0m/s3 0.0m/s3Calculation for angle, θsin θ = height/length of tract8cm height 12cm height 16cm heightsin θ = 8cm/85cm sin θ = 12cm/85cm sin θ = 16cm/85cm θ = sin-1(8cm/85cm) θ = sin-1(12cm/85cm) θ = sin-1(16cm/85cm) = 5.4° = 8.1° = 10.8° 9
  • 10. Graphs:Position versus Time graph, Velocity versus Time graph, Acceleration versus Time graph ineach diagram for each inclined angle.Angle = 5.4°Angle = 8.1° 10
  • 11. Angle = 10.8°Discussiona. Describe the situation where an object slide down at different inclined angle and the forces that involved in it. Object placed on an inclined plane will always slide down. The rate of the object sliding down the surface is depends on how tilted the surface is; or how big the inclined angle is. The greater the inclined angle, the greater the acceleration. Objects are known to accelerate down inclined planes because of an unbalanced force. For object on inclined plane, there always at least two forces acting that are the force of gravity and the normal force. The normal force is always directed perpendicular to the surface. Two forces acting: The force of gravity and the normal force 11
  • 12. b. What are the forces that acting upon an accelerating object on inclined track and draw a diagram to show the forces, plus state how the acceleration is formed? The normal force and the gravitational force Component parallel to the plane, mg sin θ Component perpendicular to the plane, mg cos θ The gravitational force‟s component perpendicular to the plane is directed opposite the normal force and as such balances the normal force. While the parallel component; is not balanced by any other force. Therefore, object on the plane will subsequently accelerate down due to the presence of an unbalanced force. It is the parallel component of the force of gravity that causes this acceleration.c. From the result, describe how the acceleration is affected by different inclined angles? The acceleration due to gravity, g, has a constant value of 9.8m/s2. Gravity accelerates objects down the inclined plane. But not the full force of gravity; only the component of gravity, mg sin θ, act along the plane accelerates the object. The size of incline angle can affect the object‟s acceleration down the inclined plane. As the angle increase, the component of force parallel to the incline plane increase, and the component perpendicular to the incline decrease and vice versa. As the θ increase, -mg sin θ increaseComponent parallel to Component -mg cos θ decrease.the plane, mg sin θ perpendicular to the plane, mg cos θ 12
  • 13. d. What are the constant variables in this experiment? The gravitational force g and the mass of cart used, m, is the constant variables.e. What precaution/ precautions you took when doing this experiment? In this experiment, we use the motion sensor to detect the motion of the cart down the inclined plane. The sensor is sensitive to any motion. Before releasing the cart, it must not hold where the motion sensor can sense the movement of your finger. The cart should be just released and not by applying any force. The motion sensor also must be directed parallel with the plane. To obtain the best result, several trials and take the best smoothest graph plotted by the computer.Experiment’s conclusion The acceleration of the cart is affected by the angle of the inclined plane. The bigger the angle; the greater the cart‟s acceleration. This is because of the “parallel to plane” gravity component; mg sin θ which is the acceleration of cart increase as the angle increase. The angle of the inclined plane is determined by using Pythagoras theorem Using the data logger from the Data Studio software, the graph of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time is plotted automatically.4 ENHANCEThis stage is about how the concept has been applied in life. The acceleration that increasewith the angle of inclined plane concept has been apply in our daily life without many peoplenotice the principle that work behind it. For example: Cycling downhill or driving downhillwithout extra energy or power. Most of the times, we can even stop using energy or power tocycle and drive downhill but control the speed that resulted from the increase of accelerationdue to gravity in inclined area. Another example is the flow of river water is faster at theupstream compared to the downstream. The application of inclined plane, which is one of the six classical simple machines,has been used when we move up or down the goods from a lorry or a higher place. Movingan object up an inclined plane requires less force than lifting it straight up, at a cost of an 13
  • 14. increase in the distance for the object to move. Wheelchair ramp and cable railway are twoof the inventions from the inclined plane concept. The concept of increasing acceleration with increasing in angle of inclined plane hasbeen practices; when the goods are moving upwards using the inclined plane, the distance totravelled is increasing using a longer inclined plane so that inclined angle become smaller andthe force to push it upward become smaller, while when goods are moving downwards, ashorter distance inclined plane is used to increase inclined angle, thus increase the force dueto gravity and smaller force needed to push it downward or just to control the acceleration ofgoods. The concept of increase in angle of inclined plane also used in playground sliding,winter sliding, and a lots more applications.5 UNIQUE FEATURES OF THIS ACTIVITYa. The position, velocity and acceleration of the cart can be determined and measured accurately using the motion sensor. This is different from the traditional ways where the ticker timer and ticker tape are use to measure the position, velocity and acceleration of the cart manually when lots of calculation and graphs are needed to calculate and plot before we can directly determine slope from the graphs and discuss the result obtained.b. Three different graphs can be plotted at the same time.c. Less work needs to be done by the students. The students do not need to do a long list of calculations and pieces of graph papers.d. Discussion can be take part after the experiment without wasting more time to do the analyze process as the slope of graph can be determine directly using the tools in data logger.e. The changes of the data and graph can be observed immediately, allowing students to make any changes or detect and overcome any errors in the experiment.f. The experiment can be repeated many times to obtained the accurate readings.6 CONCLUSIONEach of these experiments was very quick and easy to set up plane, retort stand, a data loggerand some sensors. Using the simplest mode of operation of the software means that almost noknowledge or experience of data logging is required. Press green for go and red for stop. Thiscan be a straightforward way to introduce data logging to our lessons and build familiarityand confidence with the hardware and software. The wealth of data helps children to focus on 14
  • 15. the patterns in the graphs and what they mean in terms of physics, and to develop chartreading skills. Above all the data prompts questions from the pupils, arousing their curiosityand providing opportunities for them to develop investigative strategies to answer thosequestions. The speed of data collection with data loggers allows many of these questions tobe quickly answered by rerunning the experiment with simple variations, adjusting sensorpositions, physical conditions or adding sensors. It also focuses pupil attention on details ofexperimental setup such as the exact location of the sensors. The value of electronic data also shows itself in the ease with which it can be shared.It can be e-mailed to absent pupils or to the whole class and pupils can easily augment it bylabeling a chart in Word or reprocessing the data in Excel (or the original software). It can betransferred to PowerPoint and worked on collaboratively in small groups. Data loggingenables the more able to handle data in more sophisticated ways. The less able can focus onthe meaning of the data rather than simply plotting it (a high-level task) as well as completingwell-presented work that they can be proud of and that will be worthy of display. 15
  • 16. REFERENCESAcceleration (2012). Retrieved November 30, 2012 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ AccelerationCable Railway (2012). Retrieved November 30, 2012 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Inclined_plane_railroadData logger (2012). Retrieved November 29, 2012 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Data_loggerData logger. Retrieved November 29, 2012 from http://www.omega.com/prodinfo/ dataloggers.htmlInclined plane (2008). Retrieved November 30, 2012 from http://www.newworldencyc lopedia.org/entry/Inclined_planeInclined plane (2012). Retrieved Disember 1, 2012 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inc lined_plane 16
  • 17. APPENDIX Experiment set-up Computer that has DataStudio 17
  • 18. DataStudio is openedGraphs plotted by Data Studio 18

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