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My presentation at the INTED 2013 Conference about my cases in my PhD

My presentation at the INTED 2013 Conference about my cases in my PhD

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  • Its interesting to see Facebook, Etherpad, and Moodle forum to be applied for a similar purpose-classroom interaction. A big group such a classroom may not give feeling of community, belonging, trust, and a safe place for students. Some times anonymous interaction would be better, because they have to aware that the post ca be dangerous, if it sounds stupid, or nonsense. Etherpad may serve a better for this sense. However, Facebook give a very strong sense of identity, if the classroom students know each other may be interaction can be smooth.

    However, if interaction with in a small group would give most benefit from the online discussion.
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Inted2013 lillian buus - Different approaches to experimenting with social media in he Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Different  Approaches  to   Experimen3ng  with  Social  Media  in   Higher  Educa3on?     -­‐  introduc3on  to  my  Ph.D.  en3tled   ”The  Learning  Poten3als  using  Web   2.0  in  a  PBL  approach”  MA,  PhD  Candidate  Lillian  Buus  -­‐  lillian@hum.aau.dk  E-­‐Learning  Lab  –  Center  for  User  Driven  Innova3on  Learning  and  Design  (www.ell.aau.dk)  Dept.  of  Communica3on  and  Psychology,  Aalborg  University  
  • 2. Objec3ve  for  my  research  •  How  can  and  will  the  integra3on  of  social   media  and  web  2.0  ac3vi3es  and  tool   implicate  the  teaching  and  learning  process  in   a  problem  based  learning  environment   –  Focusing  on  the  teachers  integra(on  and  use  of   web  2.0  ac(vi(es  and  tools  in  their  teaching   prac3ce   –  Taking  point  of  departure  in  the  PBL  model  at   Aalborg  University  
  • 3. Point  of  departure…  •  Conducted  a  kick-­‐off  workshop  in  April  2011   –  Using  a  Collabora3ve  E-­‐learning  Design  Method  (CoED)     –  12  teachers  signed-­‐up  but  only  7  par3cipated  (voluntarily)    Original  source:    the  Collabora(ve  E-­‐learning  Design  method  (CoED)    (Georgsen  &  Nyvang,  2007)    My  method  further  described  in:    Scaffolding  Teachers  Integrate  Social  Media  Into  a  Problem‑Based  Learning  Approach?  (Buus,  2012  
  • 4. The  process…    • Kick-­‐off     Follow-­‐up   • Follow  the  process  and   sessions   ac3vi3es  going  on   • Presen3ng  “Web  2.0  /   • Interview   Social  Media”   • Follow  up  on  the  design  –   • Teachers     • Discus  pedagogical  values   Support   • Students   • Make  a  “Learning  design”   • Individual  sessions  –  secng   • only  3-­‐4  students   • Ac3vi3es,  Resources,   Infrastructure   up  the  web  2.0  ac3vity   • Representa3ves  from   • Group  sessions/ each  course     introduc3ons   • Survey     • Zotero   • Students  –  before  and   • Eitherpad   aher  the  courses   • Prezi   Design   • Etc.     workshop   Interview  /   Survey  
  • 5. Emerged  from  the  workshop…  •  Have  been  following  3  teachers  integra3ng  web  2.0  ac3vi3es  supported  by   social  media  or  ICT    •  3  different  Cases:   –  E-­‐Business   •  Unlimited  supervision  through  online  media   •  Autumn  2011  and  2012     –  Law     •  Online  comments  and  dialog  ‘on  site’  during  lectures   •  Spring  2011  and  2012     –  Psychology   •  Peer-­‐Group-­‐reflec3ons     •  Autumn  2011  
  • 6. Case  1:  Unlimited  supervision  •  Inten3on:  Knowledge  exchange  between   students  and  between  students  and  supervisor   •  Ask  methodological  and  theore3cal  ques3ons  in  rela3on  to   wri3ng  a  mini  project   •  A  fellow  student  should  have  posted  before  comments  from   the  supervisor   •  Danish  Company  Corpora3on  -­‐  Med24.dk    •  Interna3onal  students     •  Different  educa3onal  background  (than  AAU/PBL)     •  Around  80  Students  -­‐  divided  in  groups  of  four  •  Facebook  group  vs.  Moodle  forum   •  Facebook  group  -­‐  both  in  1.  itera3on  and  2.  itera3on  
  • 7. Case  1  (2/3)  •  Perspec3ves:   –  1.  itera3on  -­‐  primarily  prac3cal  dialog  -­‐  no   methodological  and  theore3cal  dialog  -­‐  no  other   possibili3es  for  supervision   •  Students  felt  the  presence  of  the  supervisor  (quick   response)    -­‐  some  commented  the  need  for  the   “expert”  (teacher)     •  Missing  out  dialog  and  knowledge  exchange  among  students   –  How  to  gain  this?   •  No  visible  change  in  marks   •  Focus  primarily  on  ones  own  group  process  
  • 8. Case  1  (3/3)  •  2.  itera3on  -­‐  theore3cal  and  methodological   ques3ons  -­‐  clarifying  ques3on  for  the   company  -­‐  good  dialog  among  students   –  More  (extended)  communica3on  -­‐  more  dialog-­‐ oriented  and  knowledge  exchanging   –  Posi3ve  feedback  from  students     •  concerning  the  presence  of  the  supervisor  -­‐  visibility   •  and  the  presence  of  the  Company  in  the  FB  group  
  • 9. Case  2:  Online  comments  “on  site”  •  Students  could  formulate  (theore3cal/ methodological/understandings)  difficul3es   during  lectures  on  a  shared  plaoorm     •  1.  itera3on  -­‐  Eitherpad  /  2.  itera3on  -­‐  Facebook  group   •  Eitherpad  gave  room  for  anonymity  vs.  Facebook   where  students  have  an  iden3ty   •  Teacher  made  a  “professional-­‐profile’  •  Around  200  students  a  class  
  • 10. Case  2  (2/2)  •  Perspec3ves:   –  Good  dialog  (especially  in  2.  itera3on)   •  use  of  Facebook  expanded  the  inten3ons   –  More  dialog  and  nego3a3on  between  students  and  follow  up   comments  from  the  teacher   –  Giving  the  teacher  an  impression  of  the  difficult   parts   •  Large  class  =  many  data   –  More  engagement  and  ac3vity  among  students  
  • 11. Case  3:  Peer-­‐group  reflec3ons    •  Inten3on  to  help  students  in  tying  theore3cal   perspec3ves  to  concrete  cases  and  promote   reflec3ons  and  discussions  •  Involving  around  140  students     –  divided  into  two  teams  for  lectures   –  one  group  for  the  final  workshop  •  Integra3ng  “a  blog”  -­‐  a  Moodle  forum   –  Theore3cal  discussions  in  small  groups  and  post   comments  in  the  blog    
  • 12. Case  3  (2/2)  •  Perspec3ves:     –  Focus  mostly  on  ones  own  groupwork  -­‐  not  good   at  commen3ng  others   –  Students  comments:     •  Good  for  exam  prepara3on  -­‐  having  all  in  wri3ng   –  Teacher  comments:     •  Changing  from  oral  to  wriren  ‘presenta3ons’  of  group   work  challenge  the  kind  of  evalua3on  done  on  the   group  work  during  lectures  
  • 13. Future  work…    •  Have  all  my  data   –  Interviews  with  teachers   –  Interac3on  data     •  among  students     •  among  teachers  and  students   –  Surveys  (from  students)    •  Next  step  à    Further  Analysis  =  more  wri3ng  J    
  • 14. Mail:  lillian@hum.aau.dk      Twirer:  @lbuus