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Managing your information: session 2
 

Managing your information: session 2

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    Managing your information: session 2 Managing your information: session 2 Presentation Transcript

    • Managing your information: a workshop for first-year Ph.D. students Session 2 Emma Coonan Cambridge University Library
    • Course content
      • Session 1: managing found/published information
      • Session 2: managing the information you generate
      • store – organise – retrieve – synthesize
    • Session content
      • Active reading: notemaking and recording
      • Creativity vs. project management
      • Keeping track: road maps, the big picture and lightbulb moments
      • Learning styles: how do you work?
    • Reflection
    • Active reading
      • “ The art of reading is to skip judiciously”
      • ~ P.G. Hamerton
    • Step 1: Why are you reading? http://sfl.emu.edu.tr/dept/alo/active4.htm
      • To understand a concept?
      • To gather specific facts?
      • To identify the structure of an author’s argument?
      • To find alternative views so you can challenge an argument?
    • Step 2: What’s in it for me?
      • What’s relevant/useful for my own argument?
      • What other work does this piece mesh with?
      • What lightbulb moments does it spark?
      • What might be a blind alley (a white rabbit)?
    • Step 3: Notemaking and futureproofing
      • ‘ Gut’ your text!
      • Highlight, underline, strikethrough; annotate, use symbols
      • Leave yourself clues about the content, e.g. on the cover page/in your referencing system
      • Useful tools:
      • highlighter and pen
      • PDF-Xchange Viewer/Foxit/interactive software
    • Step 4: Extracting the best bits
      • Consider where and how to store the useful extracts:
      • referencing software
      • text document
      • index cards
      • other … ?
      • How will you find the relevant bits again – quickly and easily?
    • Base document (Teresa)
    • http://www.open.ac.uk/skillsforstudy/index-cards.php Index cards
    • Mind mapping
    • Step 4: Extracting and futureproofing
      • How will you distinguish between:
      • direct quotation
      • paraphrase
      • your own ideas
      • ?
    • Activity: interrogate your text
      • Choose an approach ….
      • colour-code, mark up and annotate by type of information/what’s in it for you
      • produce a 25-word summary
      • think of two questions that Jeremy Paxman would ask the author
      • represent the argument as a mind map
    • Information issues
    • Tools for keeping on track
      • Alerting services
      • Research diary
      • Road map
      • Big picture
    • Alerting services
      • Most citation databases offer RSS or email alerts
      • Set up a profile and save useful searches
      • ‘ Drip-feed’ of information keeps you up-to-date but not overwhelmed
      • Researcher blogs
    • Research diary
      • “ The research diary can be seen as a melting pot for all of the different ingredients of a research project - prior experience, observations, readings, ideas - and a means of capturing the resulting interplay of elements.”
      • (www.biad.uce.ac.uk/research/rti/riadm/issue1/research_diaries.htm)
      • The "vehicle for ordered creativity"
      • (Schatzman & Strauss 1973: 105)
    • Road map
      • Fundamental structure of your research project: why – how – what?
      • Why are you doing what you’re doing?
      • How have you chosen to answer the question?
      • What have you found out? What does this mean?
      Giles Yeo, Clinical Biochemistry/Wolfson College
    • Road map
      • Fundamental structure of your research project: why – how – what?
      • Why are you doing what you’re doing?
      • How have you chosen to answer the question?
      • What have you found out? What does this mean?
      Research proposal
    • Road map (Jamie)
    • Road map: time management
    • Road map: time management
    • Big picture (Sandra)
    • Big picture http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/journalismlabs/2009/05/
    • Learning styles
    • Final tips
      • Where to start
      • Time and space
      • Help and support
    • Where to start
    • Where to start
      • … not with the introduction!
      • Road map/research proposal should give you structure
      • Keeping a research diary and making summaries will get you writing
      • Write modularly, then link up chunks
    • Time and space
      • Time of day : creative thinking vs. repetitive work (e.g. proofing, bibliography checking)
      • Time out to relax and reflect
      • Ph.D. research is a snapshot in time – not never-ending!
      • Working space: the right environment for you
      • Enough room for a spatial overview of your work
    • Help and support
      • University sources: GDP, CPPD, Skills Portal, Graduate Union
      • Supervisors, research groups, librarians
      • Friends and peers
      • Online forums, e.g. Graduate Junction (www.graduatejunction.net), Postgraduate Toolbox (www.postgraduatetoolbox.net)
    • Thank you!