Cite It Right!

  • 2,498 views
Uploaded on

PowerPoint to support Cite It Right! workshop.

PowerPoint to support Cite It Right! workshop.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,498
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
39
Comments
0
Likes
3

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Traditional system of scholarly communication….Standing on the shoulders of giants….
  • A good rule of thumb is to ask yourself if a knowledgeable reader would be familiar with the information in question. If he or she would have to look it up to confirm it, you should usually document it. If you're not sure, cite it to play it safe.APA advises: “Cite the work of those individuals whose ideas, theories, or research have directly influenced your work. They may provide key background information, support of dispute your thesis, or offer critical definitions and data. Citation of an article implies that you have personally read the cited work. In addition….provide documentation for all facts and figures that are not common knowledge” (p. 169).
  • Chapter in edited bookE-bookPrint journal articleElectronic journal article, databasePrint reportElectronic (pdf) reportElectronic (html) report
  • Call out, show on ppt
  • Elements on board, ask to put in proper order

Transcript

  • 1. Cite It Right!
    Okanagan College Library
    Fall 2010
  • 2. Objectives
    To understand why we cite
    To understand how we cite
    To understand the basics of APA
  • 3. What is APA?
    APA = American Psychological Association
    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association is a style manual that provides guidance and standards in:
    • research ethics
    • 4. the publication process
    • 5. article format and presentation
    • 6. AND
    Citation
  • 7. What is citation?
    Cite
    1. to support an argument.
    2. quote (a passage, book, or author).
    (Barber, 2004a)
    Citation
    1. the act of citing something from a book or other source. 2. a passage cited.
    (Barber, 2004b)
  • 8. Why do we cite?
    “Scholarly communication is the entire set of activities that ensure that research and new knowledge can be made known” (DeFelice, 2009)
  • 9. Publication (Registration and Certification)
    Creation
    Dissemination
    Manuscript & IP
    Academic
    Library
    Publisher
    Editor
    Peer Reviewers
    Reformulation
  • 10. Why do we cite?
    Citations demonstrate how you developed your argument and ideas from the ideas of others
    Citations give credit where credit is due
    Citations give the reader of your work a path to the sources you used, so they can investigate those sources if interested
    (Mohanty et al., 2009)
  • 11. Why do we cite?
    If you don’t acknowledge other people’s work, words or ideas you commit plagiarism
    Plagiarize:
    1. take and use (the thoughts, writings, inventions, etc. of another person) as one's own. 2. pass off the thoughts etc. of (another person) as one's own.
    (Barber, 2004c)
  • 12. Why do we cite?
    Okanagan College Academic Offenses regulations and policies
    “Penalties for plagiarism serve both to educate students about standards of scholarship and to deter deception and poor scholarly practices. Penalties will reflect the seriousness of the offence; including whether the offence was intentional or unintentional and whether it was a first or a repeat offence” (Okanagan College, 2010, Penalties section, para. 1 ).
  • 13. What do we cite?
    • Direct quotes
    • 14. Paraphrases
    • 15. Words or terminology specific to or unique to the author’s research, theories, or ideas
    • 16. Use of an author's argument or line of thinking
    • 17. Historical, statistical, or scientific facts
    • 18. Graphs, drawings, etc.
    • 19. Articles or studies you refer to in your work
    (Mohanty et al., 2009)
  • 20. How do we cite?
    What is it?
    What format?
    Building blocks?
    • Author(s)
    • 24. Publication date
    • 25. Title
    • 26. Publication information
    • 27. Format-specific details (i.e. page numbers, doi)
  • How do we cite?
    In text citations: citations given in the body of the article/essay/paper/assignment.
    Reference list citations: “provides the information necessary to identify and retrieve each source” (APA, 2009, p. 180).
  • 28. How do we cite?
    Refer to APA resources to determine citation style.
    Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association
    6th ed., second printing
    Available at all OC Library campuses; Call no. BF 76.7 .P83 2009
    OC Library APA style guide webpage
    • PDF and HTML versions of most common APA examples
    • 29. Links to other APA resources
    Important: The APA manual is the primary source of APA citation information. If a resource contradicts the manual – use the manual.
  • 30. How do we cite?
    Refer to APA resources to determine citation style.
    Chapter 6: Crediting Sources
    • Citing references in text p. 174
    • 31. Reference list p. 180
    • 32. Reference components p. 183
    Chapter 7: Reference Examples
  • 33. How do we cite?
    Chapter in an edited book: Some APA rules to note
    • Authors: “invert all authors’ names; give surnames and initials for up to and including seven authors…” (APA, 2009, p. 184).
    • 34. Edited book: “Place the editors’ names in the author position, and enclose the abbreviation Ed. or Eds. in parentheses after the last editor’s name.” (APA, 2009, p. 184).
    • 35. Chapter in edited book: “invert the chapter authors’ names . . . But do not invert book editors’ names … the name of the book editor should be preceded by the word In” (APA, 2009, p. 184).
  • How do we cite?
    Chapter in an edited book: Some APA rules to note
    • Book title: “Capitalize only the first word of the title and of the subtitle…and any proper nouns; italicize the title” (APA, 2009, p. 185).
    • 36. Chapter title: “Capitalize only the first word of the title and of the subtitle…and any proper nouns” (APA, 2009, p. 185).
    • 37. In text: “References … are cited in text with an author date citation system” (APA, 2009, p. 174).
    • 38. In text, direct quotes: “always provide the author, year, and specific page citation or paragraph number for nonpaginated material” (APA, 2009, p. 170).
  • How do we cite?
    Chapter in an edited book: Citation
    Bonson, A.
    (2002).
    Jessie Nagle and Susan Nagle.
    In K. Carter (Ed.),
    The small details of life: Twenty diaries by women in Canada, 1830-1996
    (pp. 119-122).
    Toronto, ON:
    University
    of Toronto Press.
    (Bonson, 2002)
    “direct quote” (Bonson, 2002, p. 120)
  • 39. How do we cite?
    Journal article retrieved online: Some APA rules to note
    • “Provide the DOI, if one has been assigned to the content” (APA, 2009, p. 191).
    • 40. “When a DOI is used, no further retrieval information is needed to identify or locate the content” (APA, 2009, p. 191).
    • 41. What’s a DOI?
    • 42. “If no DOI has been assigned to the content, provide the home page URL of the journal….If you accessing the article from a private database, you may need to do a quick web search to locate this URL” (APA, 2009, pp. 191-2).
    • 43. “In general, it is not necessary to include database information” (APA, 2009, p. 192).
    • 44. “Do not include retrieval dates unless the source material may change over time” (APA, 2009, p. 192).
  • How do we cite?
    Journal article retrieved online: Some APA rules to note
    • Article title: “Capitalize only the first word of the title and of the subtitle, if any, and any proper nous; do not italicize the title or place questions marks around it” (APA, 2009, p. 185).
    • 45. Journal title: “Give the periodical title in full, in uppercase and lowercase letters. Italicize the name of the periodical” (APA, 2009, p. 185).
    • 46. Pages: “Include the journal issue number … along with the volume number if the journal is paginated separately by issue” (APA, 2009, p. 186).
    • 47. In text: “When a work has two authors, cite both names, every time the reference occurs in text. When a work has three, four, or five authors, cite all authors the first time the reference occurs; in subsequent citations, include only the surname of the first author followed by et al. …. and the year if it is the first citation of the reference within a paragraph” (APA, 2009, p. 175).
  • How do we cite?
    Journal article retrieved online: Citation
    Anderson, K., Durbin, E., & Salinger, M. (2008). Identity theft. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 22(2), 171-192. doi:10.1257/jep.22.2.171
    Initial citation:
    (Anderson, Durbin, & Salinger, 2008)
    “direct quote” (Anderson, Durbin, & Salinger, 2008, p. 190)
    Subsequent:
    (Anderson et al., 2008)
    “direct quote” (Anderson et al., 2008, p. 192)
  • 48. How do we cite?
    Report retrieved online: Some APA rules to note
    • Group authors: “occasionally, a work will have as its author an agency, association, or institution” (APA, 2009, p. 183).
    • 49. Report titles: “Enclose additional information given on the publication for its identification and retrieval (e.g., edition, report number, volume number) in parentheses immediately after the title)” (APA, 2009, p. 185).
    • 50. “When the author is also the publisher use Author to indicate the publisher” (APA, 2009, p. 187).
    • 51. “For reports retrieved online, identify the publisher as part of the retrieval statement unless the publisher as been identified as the author: Retrieved from Agency name website: http://www.xxxxx” (APA, 2009, p. 205).
  • How do we cite?
    Report retrieved online: Some APA rules to note
    • In text: “Many electronic sources do not provide page numbers. If paragraph numbers are visible, use them… Use the abbreviation para.” (APA, 2009, p. 172).
    • 52. “If the document includes headings and neither paragraph nor page numbers are visible, cite the heading and the number of the paragraph following it to direct the reader to the location of the quoted material” (APA, 2009, p. 172).
    • 53. “In some cases … headings may be too unwieldy to cite in full. Instead, use a short title enclosed in quotation marks for the parenthetical citation” (APA, 2009, p. 172).
  • How do we cite?
    Online report: Citation
    Gu, W., & Wong, A. (2010). Estimates of human capital in Canada: The lifetime income approach (Catalogue no. 11F0027M, no. 062). Retrieved from Statistics Canada website http://www.statcan.gc.ca /pub/11f0027m/11f0027m20100 62-eng.htm
    (Gu & Wong, 2010)
    “direct quote” (Gu & Wong, 2010, “Main article, data sources section,” para. 2)
  • 54. How do we cite?
    Reference list: Some APA rules to note
    • “Double-spaced and … entries have a hanging indent” (APA, 2009, p. 180).
    • 55. “Alphabetize by author surname” (APA, 2009, p. 181).
    • 56. “References with the same authors in the same order are arranged by year of publication, the earliest first”(APA, 2009, p. 182).
  • How do we cite?
    References
    Anderson, K., Durbin, E., & Salinger, M. (2008). Identity theft. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 22(2), 171-192. doi:10.1257 /jep.22.2.171
    Bonson, A. (2002). Jessie Nagle and Susan Nagle. In K. Carter (Ed.), The small details of life: Twenty diaries by women in Canada, 1830-1996 (pp. 119-122). Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.
    Ethier, C. R., & Simmons, C. A. (2007). Introductory biomechanics: From cells to organisms [Ebrary version]. Retrieved from http://www.cambridge.org
    Gu, W., & Wong, A. (2010). Estimates of human capital in Canada: The lifetime income approach (Catalogue no. 11F0027M, no. 062). Retrieved from Statistics Canada website http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub /11f0027m/11f0027m2010062-eng.htm
    Langowitz, N. S. (2010). Small business leadership: Does being the founder matter? Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, 23(1), 53-63. Retrieved from http://www.jsbe.com
  • 57. General rules
    Every reference cited in text must be in the reference list (some exceptions)
    If you are unable to identify a specific example, use an example that is most like your source
    If a DOI is available – use it
    Not necessary to include database name
    Not necessary to include retrieval dates (unless material may change over time)
  • 58. Remember
    Give credit where credit is due
    Consult OC Library APA Citation Style guide
    Consult APA Publication Manual
    OC Library Research Writing & Citing guide
    Ask!
  • 59. References
    American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: Author.
    Association of College and Research Libraries. (2009). ACRL scholarly communication 101: Starting with the basics [PowerPoint]. Retrieved from http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholcomm/docs/SC%20101%20Introduction.ppt
    Barber, K , (Ed.). (2004a). cite. In The Canadian Oxford dictionary (2nd ed.). Retrieved from http://www.oupcanada.com /reference_trade/dictionaries.html
    Barber, K , (Ed.). (2004b). citation. In The Canadian Oxford dictionary (2nd ed.). Retrieved from http://www.oupcanada.com /reference_trade/dictionaries.html
    Barber, K , (Ed.). (2004c). plagiarize. In The Canadian Oxford dictionary (2nd ed.). Retrieved from http://www.oupcanada.com /reference_trade/dictionaries.html
    Defelice, B. (2009). New models of scholarship & publishing. Retrieved from http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/node/7
    Mohanty , S., Orphanides, A., Rumble, J., Roberts, D., Norberg, L., Vassiliadis, K. (2009). University libraries' citing information tutorial. Retrieved from http://www.lib.unc.edu /instruct/citations/introduction/
    Okanagan College. (2010). Academic offenses. Retrieved from http://webapps1.okanagan.bc.ca/ok/calendar /Calendar.aspx?page=AcademicOffenses
    LJ&RJ | 12/10/2010