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Phrasal verbs (relationships)
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Phrasal verbs (relationships)

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  • 1. “ ” PHRASAL VERBS (RELATIONSHIPS)
  • 2. Phrasal verbs are verbs made of two or three words. Look! Get up Get divorced from
  • 3. The first word is the main verb. After the main verb is an adverb (split up = dividir), or a preposition (deal with = tratar), or both (get on with = obter com a). These adverbs or prepositions are sometimes called particles (partículas).
  • 4. Phrasal verbs are very common in English, especially in spoken and formal English.
  • 5. To find the meaning of phrasal verbs, use a DICTIONARY.
  • 6. Here are some common phrasal verbs that we use to talk about relationships:  Ask (someone) out = convidar para sair;  Break up with (someone) = romper com, terminar com...;  Fall for (someone) = cair por, apaixonar-se por...;  Get on with (someone) = obter com; continuar com...;  Get over (someone, something) = superar, ‘dar a volta por cima’;  Go out with (someone) = sair com;  Let (someone) down = deixar pra baixo;
  • 7. Some phrasal verbs are separable. This mean we can put the object between the two parts of the phrasal verbs.  When the object is a pronoun or a person’s name, we put it between the two parts of the phrasal verbs. Eg.: She doens’t wanna let him down. (Ela não quer deixá-lo pra baixo.) She doesn’t wanna let Peter down. (Idem above) NOT She doesn’t wanna let down him. AND NOT USUALLY She doesn’t wanna let down Peter. *When the object is a noun, we put it between the two parts of the phrasal verb or after the particle. She doesn’t wanna let the team down. OR She doesn’t wanna let down the team.
  • 8. THANKS!!!!!! Lígia Parrião