DIDACTICA ESPECIFICA II<br />LUISA F. MORALES B.<br />DELIS M. SOTO F.<br />DANIEL J. PADILLA U.<br />DIANA ARROYO<br />UN...
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  1. 1. DIDACTICA ESPECIFICA II<br />LUISA F. MORALES B.<br />DELIS M. SOTO F.<br />DANIEL J. PADILLA U.<br />DIANA ARROYO<br />UNIVERSIDAD DE CORDOBA<br />FACULTAD DE EDUCACION<br />MONTERIA-CORDOBA<br />2011<br />READING SKILL<br />DEFINITIONS:<br />Reading is a multifaceted, complex construct in that it involves a number of component operations, each dependent on a wide range of competences.(Koda K. Insights into second language reading, Cambridge, 2004, Page xv.) <br />Reading is one of the basic skills which everyone accepts in essential for survival in the modern world. The word for being able to read is literacy. Literacy, especially when used as part of the umbrella term functional literacy, is wider than just reading words and sentences.(Barry S. How To Teach English. oxford.)<br />PRINCIPLES <br />It is important to make sure that your students have ample time for extensive reading. Sustained silent reading allows them to develop a sense of fluency.(Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 313)<br />Make sure that you give enough classroom time for focusing on the building blocks of written language, geared appropriately for each level.(Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 314)<br />ACTIVITIES<br />Students will read some questions. Then they will answer them by reading a text.(Jeremy H & Harold S. Coast To Coast Student’s Book 2, Longman 1987, Page 15)<br />In this activity students will read an article and then they will mark some sentences as True (T) or False (F). After that, they will complete some expressions which will be used in some sentences they will make.(Virginia E & Jenny D. Reading And Writing Targets 3,Express Publishing, 1999, Page 25)<br />WRITING SKILL:<br />DEFINITIONS:<br />Writing in real life is usually undertaken in response to a demand of some kind. For adults, the demand may arise from academic studies, professional responsibilities, or from such social roles as friends, purchaser, enquirer, complainant, or counselor. Students may have any of these present or possible future purposes for writing in English. But in every case there is a real audience to whom a message must be communicated.Writing in the English- language classroom can become unreal if it is only ever produced for one reader, the teacher to assess the correctness of the linguistic forms used.(Tricia H. Writing, Oxford English, 1988, Page 61)<br />Speaking involves putting together a combination of souds in a particular order to form words, phrases and sentences. When we are writing, we have to do something similar except that we do it which letters rather than sounds. We put these together to form words, phrases, clauses, and sentences. And put sentences together to make a coherent text.(Lindsay C. & Knight P. Learning and Teaching English, Oxford, 2006 Page 85)<br />PRINCIPLES:<br />Sharing writing with other students in the class is one way to add authenticity. Publishing a class newsletter, written letters to people outside of the class, writing a resume, writing advertisements. All these can be seen as authentic writing. (Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 347)<br />By reading and studying a variety of relevant types of texts, students can gain important insights both about how they should write and about subject matter that may become the topic of their writing.(Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 346)<br />ACTIVITIES<br />Students will imagine they are participating in a competition held by their favorite magazine in which participants are required to write an article entitled “Friends For Live” in which they will describe their best friend’s appearance, personality an hobbies. First, they will answer some questions such as: What vocabulary can be used to describe people? What linking words/phrases will you use? Based on the answer of those questions students will write the article which they want to participate with.(Virginia E & Jenny D, Reading and Writing Targets 3, Express Publishing, 1999, page 15)<br />Students will imagine they are reporters for a local newspaper which has asked them to write a 100 to 150 words report about a robbery that took place last night following a 4 paragraphs plan explained in the book.(Virginia E. & Jenny D. Reading And Writing Targets 3,Express Publishing, 1999, page 51)<br />SPEAKING SKILL:<br />DEFINITIONS:<br />Speaking is a complex process which involves constructing a message in a form that other people can understand, and delivering the message using the correct pronunciation, stress and intonation. Speaking also involves interaction communicating with other people.(Lindsay C. & Knight P. Learning and teaching English, Oxford, 2006, Page 68.)<br />While the student is acquiring and understanding of the writing language of these splendid models on the one hand, on the other hand he is himself practicing the art of producing sentences of the language.(Brown G. & Yule G. Cambridge. Page 1)<br />PRINCIPLES:<br />To make sure that your task include techniques designed to help students to perceive and use the building blocks of language.(Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 275)<br />Try at all times to appeal to students’ ultimate goals and interests, to their need for knowledge, for status, for achieving competence and autonomy, and for ‘being all they can be’.(Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 275)<br />ACTIVITIES:<br />In this activity students will listen to a conversation. Then, they will make a conversation like the one they listen previously. They will use some words which help them to make the conversation.Example:Say, Pascale, do you play the guitar?- Yes- Do you play very well?- Oh, not too badlyVocabulary:Play Tennis Play the trumpetPlay chessPlay me somethingTeach me to playTeach me to ice skate(Jeremy H. & Harold S. Coast To Coast Student’s Book 2, Longman 1987, Page 13)<br />Students will use some cues to make conversations like this: a: What’s the matter?b: I wish I were at home right now.1. I’m homesick. I want to be at home right now.2. I didn’t know about the parade. What a shame!<br />LISTENING SKILL:<br />DEFINITIONS:<br />Listening skill as a important as speaking skills; we cannot communicate face to face unless the two types are developed in tandem. Rehearsed production is unless if we are unable to respond to the reply that it generates from our interlocutor (I.E. the person we are trying to talk to).The second point about listening is that under many circumstances, it is a reciprocal skill. We cannot practice listening in the same way as we can reherse speaking.(Anderson A. & Lynch t. listening, Oxford. Pag 3- 4)<br />Listening comprehension consist of far more than understanding what words and sentences mean; it involves understand what speakers mean.(Brown G &Yule G, Cambridge. Page 10.)<br />PRINCIPLES:<br />Authentic language and real- words tasks enable to students to see the relevance of classroom activity to the long-term communicative goals.(Hdouglas B. Teaching By Principles, Longman, 2001 Page 258)<br />It is always preferable to start with the overall meaning of the text, its function and aim, rather than working on vocabulary or more specific ideas.(Grellet Francoise. Development Reading Skills, Cambridge)<br />ACTIVITIES:<br />Students will hear a question which will be followed by three alternative responses. Students will choose the best response. Example:- When was Mr Chen born?a. In Hong Kongb. Sine last Junec. In 1958(Gary Buck. Assessing Listening, Cambridge, 2001, Page 213)<br />In this activity students will listen to a song twice. After that, they will answer some questions according to the lyric of the song. (Gary Buck. Assessing Listening, Cambridge, 2001, Page 88)<br />

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