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Alcohol safety

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We watched it in mentoring term 1, if you dont remember it just have a quick look through it to get an idea... you dont have to read the whole thing again!

We watched it in mentoring term 1, if you dont remember it just have a quick look through it to get an idea... you dont have to read the whole thing again!

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  • Alcohol and young people Agenda: 1. Intro 9 Question quiz related to the points covered in the session (students to complete) 2. USC Survey results in form of a short film… “ USC yr 11 Students thoughts about Binge drinking” 3. National Survey Results from 2002-2005: Discussing trends etc.. Statistics shown which answer the questions of the quiz. 4. Drink Meter Activity: shows the effects of drinking certain amounts of alcohol. 5.Global initiatives to problems with drinking. 8 ads from internet or TV Students advertisements re if they would help to reduce a young person’s drinking. 6. Announcing winner of the USC short film competition Show the film and give out award.
  • $1500 Part of the government’s initiatives have been ads on TV Encouragibng young people to creat ads Don’t turn your night out into a nightmare Encouraging educational programs in schools like this one Tax on pre mix drinks or RTD To work on Education re alcohol and YP How to imbed it into the curriculum into Snr Sec Education
  • National Conducted every 3 years Approx 3,000 students, years 7-12 Alcohol, tobacco & other substances use. Cancer Council SA in collaboration with (DASSA Drug Alcohol Doing surveys for some time This session looks at past and present day info Data outside of school collected in a quantitative manner I have begun to collect Qualitative material from USC
  • FALSE analgesics
  • FALSE analgesics
  • RISKS: Causing risk of harm: sex with regret/unsafe sex, violence, falls, accidents… YP are less tolerant to alcohol due to body size & experience drinking Earlier a person starts to drink..greater the risk of alcohol related problems later in life
  • Binge drinking is on the rise in Aust affecting 1 in 3 yp Nearly a quarter have passed out because of excessive drinking Risky or high risk drinking is associated with certain chronic conditions, such as mood and anxiety problems or a chronic condition caused by injury
  • 1. How would you define binge drinking? 2. The Australian Government is trying to address the issue of binge drinking by young people. What do you think the federal government should do to address the issue? 4. How do you think binge drinking impacts on the individual? the individual’s family? the community? 5. Recently there have been a number of TV advertisements to address this issue. Which one (s) do you find effective/ ineffective and why? Do you think that the youth of Australia have a problem with binge drinking? Emailed 28 responses
  • USC research Survey:Asked a few questions Exploring what YP know about binge drinking Define: binge drinking. Aust government trying to address propblem do the USC students see that there is a problem Impact on Binge drinking on self, family, community Read some quotes Ask teachers/
  • Binge drinking is on the rise in Aust affecting 1 in 3 yp Nearly a quarter have passed out because of excessive drinking Risky or high risk drinking is associated with certain chronic conditions, such as mood and anxiety problems or a chronic condition caused by injury
  • UK
  • UK
  • Dassa drink meter Calcutes what happens to you when you have certain amounts to drin 16 years Female 50 kgs Whisky 3 hours 7 drinks Calculate
  • TRUE
  • TRUE
  • By way of a very brief introduction to today’s topic, and as many of you already know, since 1996, there has been a statistically significant decrease in the proportion of 12 to 17 year olds reporting having ever used various drugs, and, as this graph shows, using drugs recently. Compared to alcohol, the usage rate for illicit drugs continues to be very low. While approximately 90% of students report having used alcohol, in 2005, for the first time since 1996, we saw a small decrease in lifetime use of 1.6%. It will be interesting to see the results of the 2008 schoolchildren’s survey, currently underway.
  • NOTE: Interpret illicit drug statistics with caution, as changes are based on small numbers of students reporting use of these substances.
  • TRUE
  • TRUE
  • NOTE: Interpret illicit drug statistics with caution, as changes are based on small numbers of students reporting use of these substances.
  • From Us
  • Although some/many parents believe that alcohol use is a ‘rite of passage’ and that their teenagers are simply ‘doing what they did’ – there is evidence to suggest that we are seeing very different patterns of drinking. Of those that do drink ….
  • Its when they start drinking that’s the problem Todays youth tend to start drinking earlier
  • Ireland
  • From the Drug Info Clearing house, Dec 09 Regular alcopops contain between four and five per cent alcohol and "premium" or super-strength alcopops can contain up to nine per cent alcohol. Alcopops can also include caffeine and other stimulants that can give drinkers a false sense of alertness. One of the main concerns with alcopops is their appeal to underage drinkers. Evidence suggests that alcopops initiate young people in their early teens into alcohol use. The sweet soft drink flavour disguises the alcohol taste and content. A Choice report in 2008 found that 24 per cent of the 18 ミ 19-year-olds thought there was no alcohol in the alcopops they tasted. n April 2008 an increase in excise tax was passed on alcopops to bring the tax rate of their alcohol content in line with that of other spirits. Market researcher AC Nielsen reported sales of alcopops fell by about one-third, and while spirits and beer increased there was a general decrease in the net amount of alcohol sold to consumers during the period (Chikritzhs et al 2009). After strong lobbying by both health groups and the alcohol industry, the Bill was rejected by the Senate in March 2009. The revenue gathered will be returned to the various arms of the alcohol industry that paid the excise and the price of alcopops should drop to pre-tax levels.
  • And “shouting a round” at the pub is common and expected among a group of friends. Work hard means we party hard………… Much of this has to do with the dominance of consumerism and the commodification of cultural life that has changed the way we measure happiness & pleasure. YP are major targets of marketing strategies and the consumer culture contributes to the way YP construct their identity Births, deaths, marriages, graduations, and celebrations of all sorts are just not the same without a glass of something chilled Alcohol is generally seen as an acceptable and common source of enjoyment and a key part of social interaction Drinking style of young people differs to adult counterparts e.g., “determined drunkenness”, “vertical drinking”
  • So what can we say about the drinking culture in Australia: Alcohol integrated into Australian way of life Alcohol is most popular and widespread psychoactive substance in Australia Alcohol is legal, socially sanctioned and widely promoted Drinking is primarily a social activity, shaped by biological, psychological, environmental and cultural factors Drinking is a learned behaviour that reflects norms, standards, expectations and environmental constraints Alcohol has a complex role in Australian society. Most Australians drink alcohol, generally for enjoyment, relaxation and sociability, and do so at levels that cause few adverse effects( 2009 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
  • It is learned from when we are young We learn through observation of parents, family friends It is contextual.. Re our culture Our family The different culture we choose/ to socialize in If the groups we hang about feel that you don’t need to drink to have fun Then we may be more likely to find it easier not to binge CLIP 1 assessment How affective they are in helping ypong people think about their drinking There are 12 short clips around 30 sec long We wont discuss them I just wan to get your rating Hand papers up in the end Research looking at how YP) are affected by the Media Today I am using digital film media. Studnets at school I survey half of the surveyed group indicated they really don’t watch TV and were unfamiliar of the ads that aim to curb binge drinking. Here are some ads from various places in the world. Some are shown on TV others internet
  • From stats not everyone binges Often we persume that others drink more Bravado leisure realm = rich forum for enculturation normative behaviours around drinking are assumed & expressed a sense of national pride is expressed through drinking to excess
  • Promotion of sport
  • AUST Culture of drinking
  • true
  • true
  • While the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that there is no safe level of alcohol use for young people under 18, and that for adults, more than two standard drinks on any one occasion can be harmful, about 28% of young people between 12 and 17 years report having used alcohol at harmful levels in the last two weeks i.e. five or more drinks on one occasion. Click twice
  • From UK
  • False Its more than 25%
  • False Its more than 25%
  • Not a complete list of categories, but most common ones.
  • FALSE 15-19 year olds
  • FALSE 15-19 year olds
  • Counting the cost of alcohol use in Australia The number of people hospitalised for alcohol-related injuries & diseases increased nationally by 34% between 1995-2006 (National Drug Research Institute, 2009) Victoria jumped 77%, with the cost of alcohol related harm in 2007-2008 being $4.3 billion Child Protection statistics show 34,000 children are in care nationally. Half of these children have at least one parent with an alcohol problem and 13% of Australian children live in a household with at least one adult is regularly drunk. (Prof Dorothy Scott, Uni SA, media release 21 Jan, 2010.)
  • Alcohol normal causes a predictable decrease in reaction time and motor coordination. As blood alcohol rises there is also an increase in the level of sedation. In adults, alcohol will tend to cause drowsiness with associated loss of attention and motor coordination. Higher levels of alcohol intoxication can lead to unconsciousness and depress even very basic physiological processes such as the drive to breathe.
  • Discuss Cyber Safety USA CYBER FOOTPRINT Discuss
  • This is where a person cannot recall key aspects of their behaviour in the period immediately following a bout of intoxication. In essence, it indicates that the brain processes that code short-term memory (located in the hippocampus and related temporal lobe structures) were seriously disrupted when the person was intoxicated. It is believed that this phenomenon is indicative of at least short and, potentially, longer-term damage to the hippocampus.
  • 6. False 7. False
  • 6. False 7. False
  • No goes beyond
  • No goes beyond
  • Head of Discipline, Prof of Addiction StudiesEmail [email_address] Fax0 8224 0685Building Medical School North Floor/Room5 06CampusNorth TerraceOrg Unit Pharmacology
  • The impact of alcohol on the adolescent brain Dr. Andrew Rochford The brain is our control centre. It directs all the functions that go on in our body - conscious and unconscious. Arguably, a healthy brain is our most valuable asset. We once thought the teenage brain was the same as an adult brain   that it had reached full development and finished growing by the time puberty had kicked in. But now the latest brain science is telling us a very different story. From the age of 12 or 13 through to the early 20s, the brain is in a state of intense development, moulding and hardwiring in readiness for the challenges of adulthood ahead. Through a process called ‘frontalisation’, the brain is busy forming all the critical parts it needs for learning, memory, planning, emotional stability and thinking for the rest of life. Once this development phase is complete, at around about 23 or 24 years of age, the brain’s capacity is fixed and cannot be changed. The development period is therefore vitally important and anything that interferes with this is obviously bad news. Alcohol disrupts brain development. Teenagers who drink alcohol risk their brains not reaching full capacity, which means they might never reach their full potential as an adult. It’s that simple!
  • Damage to the brain during this critical development period appears to have long-lasting consequences on those higher order cognitive and emotional functions that are essential for maximum occupational and social function as an adult. Young people who consumer brain-toxic substances early in their teenage years are at increased risk of developing major mental health problems later in the later adolescent or early adult years; and, Young people with major mental health problems and alcohol or other drug-related disorders have two sets of problems that are likely to have long-term adverse effects on their brain development. A LC O HO
  • Young people with first lifetime episodes of anxiety, depression or psychotic disorders who also consume significant amounts of alcohol are at increased risk of self-harm, attempted suicide, accidental injury as well as persistence or recurrence of their primary mental health problem.
  • Dutch ad
  • Retink your drinkls How affect self and others
  • True
  • True
  • The frontal lobes of the brain start developing from around the age of 12. Drinking alcohol during the early stage of development, could potentially damage this critical part of their brain.
  • Kids help line DASSA
  • Transcript

    • 1.
      • START COMPLETING YOUR QUIZ
    • 2.
      • 1. Intro… grant
      • Quiz related to the points covered in the session
      • 2. USC Survey results
      • 3. National Survey Results
      • 4. Drink Meter
      • 5. Global initiatives to problems with drinking.
      • 6. Assessing Ads from internet or TV
      • 7. Evaluation… Where to next?
    • 3.
      • Grant from Federal Government
      • Main foci:
      • Consider the information. about binge drinking
      • Think before you act… Rethink your next drink
    • 4.
      • Information from the SA component of the 2008 Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol & Drug Survey (ASSADS )
        • Paul Dillon @ DARTA
        • Adelaide Uni
        • UniSA
        • Flinders Uni
        • Drug Strategy
        • University Snr College
    • 5.
      • Alcohol is the most widely used drug of 12 -17 year olds
      • True or false
    • 6.
      • Alcohol is the most widely used drug of 12 -17 year olds
      • false
    • 7.  
    • 8.
      • 18 % of 18-24yr olds drink in a risky way once a week
      • 49% of 18 -24 yr olds drink in a risky way at least once a month
      • 1 in 10 YP aged 14-19 put themselves at risk of alcohol related harm each week .
    • 9.  
    • 10.
      • So what’s a binge?
    • 11.
      • 5 Questions
      • About binge drinking
      • Effects
      • Suggestions
      • Commenting on advertising
    • 12.
      • Drinking more than 2 standard drinks in the space of a few hours
      • Excessive drinking all in one night, or at one particular time
      • Drinking too much
      • Binge drinking to me is when excessive alcohol is being drunk on a regular basis(weekly).
      • Drinking to get drunk every weekend
    • 13.
      • 5 drinks in a day is seen as a binge.
      • 4 for adult woman is seen as risky/binge
      • 6 for adult males are seen as risky/ binge
      high risk drinking refers to drinking above these guidelines based on a 7 -day average
    • 14.  
    • 15.
      • Age is an important determinant of health risks related to alcohol.
      • Harm from alcohol-related accident or injury is experienced disproportionately by younger people;
      • over ....
      • 1/4
      • of all serious alcohol-related road injuries occur among 15–24-year-olds.
      • True or false
      Question 3
    • 16.
      • Age is an important determinant of health risks related to alcohol.
      • Harm from alcohol-related accident or injury is experienced disproportionately by younger people;
      • over .... ¼
      • of all serious alcohol-related road injuries occur among 15–24-year-olds.
      • False = 1/2
    • 17.  
    • 18.
      • http://www.dassa.sa.gov.au/webdata/resources/files/drinkmeter.swf
    • 19.
      • Over 80% of the Australian population 14 years & over have used alcohol in the past 12 months.
      • True or false?
    • 20.
      • Over 80% of the Australian population 14 years & over have used alcohol in the past 12 months.
      • True
    • 21.  
    • 22. The proportions of students reporting lifetime use of alcohol have decreased since the 2005 survey. Substance 2005 2008 Analgesics 94.1 95.0 Alcohol 87.3 85.1 Tobacco 31.2 24.3 Cannabis 18.2 12.5 Sedatives 14.2 17.9 Inhalants 13.0 16.4
    • 23.
      • Since 2005, there has been a decrease in the proportion of students 12 – 17 years reporting using any drug, including alcohol, in the last week……
      • True or false?
    • 24.
      • Since 2005, there has been a decrease in the proportion of students 12 – 17 years reporting using any drug, including alcohol, in the last week……
      • False
    • 25. Substance 2005 2008 Analgesics 41 43 Alcohol 25 23 Tobacco 7.5 4.9 Cannabis 4.7 3.3 Sedatives <2 2.8 Inhalants 2.5 4.2
    • 26.  
    • 27.
      • they begin drinking earlier
      • they drink more, more often
      • they now drink spirits
      • vodka being the preferred for young women & rum or bourbon for young males
      Slide courtesy Paul Dillon: Drug and Alcohol Research and Training Australia (DARTA) www.darta.net.au
    • 28. Slide courtesy Ann M Roche, National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University
    • 29.  
    • 30. The Shift to Spirits Slide courtesy Ann M Roche, National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University
    • 31.
      • Many important social changes:
        • in families, lifestyles & women’s roles..
        • 3 M’s – deferred… marriage…mortgage…maternity
      • Concept of ‘youth’ and eternal pursuit of ‘youthfulness’
      • Drinking patterns (incl. what we drink, how we drink vertical drinking)
      • Commodification of leisure, wellbeing
      • Views about work/life balance
      Young People and Alcohol: What Has Changed?
    • 32.
      • Alcohol is integrated into Australian way of life
      • Alcohol is most popular psychoactive substance in Australia
      • Alcohol is legal, socially sanctioned & widely promoted
      • Drinking is a social activity
      • Drinking is a learned behaviour
    • 33.  
    • 34. Big Day Out, Feb 2010 International Cricket, 2010 Sharing a few Chrissie Drinks ‘09
    • 35.
      • Market forces - global
      • Advertising influence young people’s decisions about drinking:
        • when to drink (initiation)
        • what to drink
        • how much to drink
        • where to drink
        • who to drink with
        • Advertising/Marketing – part of cultural context
    • 36.
      • Branded promotional material
      • Point-of-Sale
      • Position
      • Films, TV, music
      marketing to over 18s: impact on under 18s who want to be older?
    • 37.  
    • 38.
      • Approximately 72% of young people aged 12-17 years are NOT binge drinkers.
      • True or false?
    • 39.
      • Australia’s youth cannot be generalised & classified as one group. While some most certainly have an issue with binge drinking, others are the complete opposite & may have never even touched alcohol.
      • Yes, I think the Youth of Australia are too focussed on drinking just for fun & don’t realise the seriousness of their actions. It is pointless & takes the focus away from their education & their future.
      • Yea, people are drinking when they are too young
    • 40.
      • Approximately 72% of young people aged 12-17 years are NOT binge drinkers.
      • True
    • 41. Students reporting *  5 drinks on any occasion in the last 2 weeks Source: ASSADS 2005 (DASSA analysis of SA dataset)
    • 42.  
    • 43.
      • The proportion of young people aged 12-17 years drinking alcohol in their parents’ homes is 25%.
      • True or false?
    • 44.
      • The proportion of young people aged 12-17 years drinking alcohol in their parents’ homes is 25%.
      • False
    • 45. # categories NOT directly comparable Sources: * ASSADS (SA), * NDSHS 2004 (Australia) place ASSAD* 12 to 17 yo NDSHS* 14 to 19 yo NDSHS* 20 to 29 yo My home 40% 59% 76% Friend’s home 14% 58% 68% Licensed premise 6% 40% 77% Restaurant/cafe 1% 20% 52% Private party/s 30% 69% 61% Workplace - 3% 13% Rave/dance party/s 1% 13% 17%
    • 46.
      • Young people aged 20 to 25 are most likely to be hospitalised for acute alcohol intoxication.
      • True or false?
    • 47.
      • Young people aged 20 to 25 are most likely to be hospitalised for acute alcohol intoxication.
      • false
    • 48. Age group (years) Rate – per 100,000 population Slide courtesy Paul Dillon: Drug and Alcohol Research and Training Australia (DARTA) www.darta.net.au
    • 49.
      • 1 in 4 hospitalisations of 15-25 year olds happen because of alcohol
      • 70 Australians under 25 will be hospitalised due to alcohol-caused assault in an average week
      • 1 in 2 Australians aged 15–17 who get drunk will do something they regret
      • Sources:
      • Chikritzhs, T. and Pascal, R. (2004). Trends in Youth Alcohol Consumption and Related Harms in Australian Jurisdictions, 1990–2002. Bulletin No. 6. National Drug Research Institute.
      • Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing (2008). National Youth Alcohol Campaign evaluation research 2000-2002. Unpublished raw data.
      • Source: National Drug Research Institute (2008). 2004-05 Hospitalisation and morbidity data for Australians aged 0 to 24. Unpublished raw data.
      • Source: National Drug Research Institute (2008). 2004-05 Hospitalisation and morbidity data for Australians aged 0 to 24. Unpublished raw data.
    • 50.  
    • 51.
      • Simon was always a loser till he sculled more than anyone else at Abdul’s party …
      • Now he’s a legend!
      • (16 year old boy)
    • 52.
      • Black outs only affect short term memory
      • True of false?
    • 53.
      • Black outs only affect short term memory
      • False
      • They can potentially affect long term memory
      • Cause significant damage to the brain
      DrinkWise Parents - The danger of blackouts
    • 54.
      • Statement 9
      • Drinking milk before alcohol means that you can drink more before you get drunk.
      • True or False?
    • 55.
      • Answer 9
      • Drinking milk before alcohol means that you can drink more before you get drunk.
      • False
    • 56.
      • If you throw up before
      • you go to bed, you wont get a
      • hangover.
      • True or False?
    • 57.
      • If you throw up before
      • you go to bed, you wont get a
      • hangover.
      • False
    • 58.
      • Adolescent brain development mainly occurs between 12 &18 years.
      • True or False
      Statement 11
    • 59.
      • Adolescent brain development mainly occurs between 12 &18 years.
      • False
      Answer 11
    • 60. Brain Maturation
      • the adolescent period of physical development is from 12-18 years, based on brain maturation it extends to about 25 years of age.
      • …… Prof Jason White
    • 61.
      • memory tasks
      • problem solving
      • visual & spatial skills
      • In addition, the pattern of brain activity while performing these tasks is different.
      • …………… Prof Jason White
    • 62.
      • Aiming for a HIGH TER? Re think….
      • Damage to the brain during adolescence appears to have long-lasting consequences on those higher order cognitive & emotional functions
        • that are essential for maximum occupational & social function as an adult.
    • 63.
      • develop an alcohol problem
      • develop another substance abuse problem
      • develop a mental health problem (incl: anxiety & depression)
      • be involved in criminality
      • have academic difficulties
      • be financially less well off
      • …………… Prof Jason White
    • 64.  
    • 65.  
    • 66.
      • There is no safe level of alcohol use for young people under 18?
      • True or False
    • 67.
      • There is no safe level of alcohol use for young people under 18?
      • True
    • 68.
      • DrinkWise Parents - The risks to a developing brain
    • 69. Need help? Contact Nadia &/or www.dasc.sa.gov.au …Youthline 1300 13 17 19

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