Philanthropy and    FoundationsJoint Master of Social Work Program        NC A&T and UNCG         January 24, 2012
AGENDA                  Private Philanthropy                Foundations Grantmaking     Careers in   Trends       Philanth...
Who Gives?
Who Receives?
Foundation Funding
Giving Trends
A Typical Foundation?•   More than 3/5 of active foundations    were established after 1989*•   17% are staffed•   8% ARs ...
2009 PerspectivePhilanthropy: $303 Billion• $383 Billion = national debt service• $672 Billion = Social Security benefits•...
Working with Foundations 1) What are foundations? What are the different    kinds? What do they do? 2) What is the relatio...
THE TEDIOUS AND TIME CONSUMINGMETHOD THAT IS, UNFORTUNATELY,OFTEN TIMES NECESSARYWhat are you trying to find out?1) Who th...
SOME UNOFFICIAL TRUTHS ABOUT GRANTSEEKING1) You will have a much easier time getting funded for   something new rather tha...
SOME UNOFFICIAL TRUTHS ABOUT GRANTSEEKING(continued)4) Your chances for success increase    dramatically if you have had p...
4 DRAWBACKS OF GRANTS PURSUIT(AND REALIZATION)- IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER-1) THE MONEY RUNS OUT2) EFFORT DOES NOT EQUAL RETUR...
KEY COMPONENTS OF A SUCCESSFULGRANT PROPOSAL ESTABLISHMENT OF PROBLEM/NEED YOU WANT TO ADDRESS •   Statistics •   Anecdota...
DO• Read all the materials that the foundation or  other funder has published.• Start talking to the foundation representa...
DO(continued)• Commit time and work to participation in community or  regional networks relevant to health and human servi...
• Realistic goals• Leadership—management/board• Financial viability• Collaboration• Sustainability• Local commitment, incl...
DO NOT• Call a foundation saying that you need money for XYZ.• Use the names of elected officials of other prominent perso...
Trends and Progress
Outcomes-Focused Grantmaking•   Focus Shift (Compliance – Outcomes)•   Use of Language is Important•   Budget – not intere...
Resources• Grant Proposal Makeover by Cheryl A. Clarke  and Susan P. Fox• Center for Effective Philanthropy• The Rensselva...
Resources
Questions and Answers
Edgar Villanueva, MHA, FACHEOwner/Principal Consultantedgar@leveragepartners.net[T} LEVERAGEpartnerwww.leveragepartners.net
Philanthropy and Foundations
Philanthropy and Foundations
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Philanthropy and Foundations

394 views
369 views

Published on

January 2012: Presentation to MSW students at UNCG/NC A&T University

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
394
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • http://foundationcenter.org/gainknowledge/research/pdf/fgt10highlights.pdf
  • According to the Social Security administration, in 2009 nearly 51 million Americans received $672.http://thenationaldebtcrisis.com/national-debt-service/
  • http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/53/50/43851081.pdfCatalytic PhilanthropyBy Mark R. KramerStanford
  • Philanthropy and Foundations

    1. 1. Philanthropy and FoundationsJoint Master of Social Work Program NC A&T and UNCG January 24, 2012
    2. 2. AGENDA Private Philanthropy Foundations Grantmaking Careers in Trends Philanthropy
    3. 3. Who Gives?
    4. 4. Who Receives?
    5. 5. Foundation Funding
    6. 6. Giving Trends
    7. 7. A Typical Foundation?• More than 3/5 of active foundations were established after 1989*• 17% are staffed• 8% ARs 120 100• 17% have publications 100 1975 80• 11% have Web sites 68 1980 60 56 1985 1990 40 40 25.6 32 1995 21.8 22.09 2000 20 2006 2020* 0 Foundations
    8. 8. 2009 PerspectivePhilanthropy: $303 Billion• $383 Billion = national debt service• $672 Billion = Social Security benefits• $404 Billion = Wal-Mart Revenue
    9. 9. Working with Foundations 1) What are foundations? What are the different kinds? What do they do? 2) What is the relationship between grant proposals and foundation work? 3) What do foundations and other funders look for when determining who gets grant dollars? 4) What are some procedural do’s and donts in trying to get projects funded?
    10. 10. THE TEDIOUS AND TIME CONSUMINGMETHOD THAT IS, UNFORTUNATELY,OFTEN TIMES NECESSARYWhat are you trying to find out?1) Who they give to? (Eligibility)2) When? (Deadlines)3) Who they have given to? (Previous Recipients)4) How to apply? (Format)
    11. 11. SOME UNOFFICIAL TRUTHS ABOUT GRANTSEEKING1) You will have a much easier time getting funded for something new rather than something you have been doing already.2) Submitting joint proposals with collaborators increases your chances of success exponentially.3) No one can sit in a room by themselves and develop an effective grants project.
    12. 12. SOME UNOFFICIAL TRUTHS ABOUT GRANTSEEKING(continued)4) Your chances for success increase dramatically if you have had positive interaction with the funder before you submit your proposal.5) Much of the information required in grants can, and should be prepared ahead of time.6) The worst way to develop a grant seeking project is in response to a notice of fund availability.
    13. 13. 4 DRAWBACKS OF GRANTS PURSUIT(AND REALIZATION)- IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER-1) THE MONEY RUNS OUT2) EFFORT DOES NOT EQUAL RETURN3) INTRAORGANIZATIONAL STRESS4) UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS
    14. 14. KEY COMPONENTS OF A SUCCESSFULGRANT PROPOSAL ESTABLISHMENT OF PROBLEM/NEED YOU WANT TO ADDRESS • Statistics • Anecdotal reports from within or outside • Community-wide needs vs. institutional • Surveys/Public Forums/Community Input YOUR PROPOSED SOLUTION • Logic • Within your capacity and experience • Considers other providers • Reasonable within the timeframe you have suggested
    15. 15. DO• Read all the materials that the foundation or other funder has published.• Start talking to the foundation representatives well before their deadlines and before your proposed project start dates.• Develop a system within your organization that identifies potential projects early on and is prepared when opportunities present themselves. Have a system whereby people involved in accounting, finance and other areas of operations can respond quickly and knowledgably to the needs of the funders.
    16. 16. DO(continued)• Commit time and work to participation in community or regional networks relevant to health and human service issues.• Enhance your knowledge of the people you currently serve and those who you are not currently serving.• Demonstrate an in depth knowledge of what other services are being offered in the community.
    17. 17. • Realistic goals• Leadership—management/board• Financial viability• Collaboration• Sustainability• Local commitment, including organization putting in some of their own money
    18. 18. DO NOT• Call a foundation saying that you need money for XYZ.• Use the names of elected officials of other prominent persons unless you are absolutely sure of the relationships in the community.• Try to shame the foundation person into acknowledging the need for your project.• Request funding for items or program areas that the foundation does not fund.• Criticize the efforts of others.• Get consultants involved as spokespersons.
    19. 19. Trends and Progress
    20. 20. Outcomes-Focused Grantmaking• Focus Shift (Compliance – Outcomes)• Use of Language is Important• Budget – not interested in money, but money in motion• Measuring gain• Milestones/Results• Resources: Outcome Funding, Hal Williams
    21. 21. Resources• Grant Proposal Makeover by Cheryl A. Clarke and Susan P. Fox• Center for Effective Philanthropy• The Rensselvaerville Institute/Center for What Works• NC Center for Nonprofits• QENO @ UNCW
    22. 22. Resources
    23. 23. Questions and Answers
    24. 24. Edgar Villanueva, MHA, FACHEOwner/Principal Consultantedgar@leveragepartners.net[T} LEVERAGEpartnerwww.leveragepartners.net

    ×