Supporting the Hyper Efficient Worker:Delivering on a global integratedcollaboration, communication& mobility strategy
More than ever, today’s knowledge workers expect accessto a full range of collaboration tools available from any deviceand...
In the midst of the great transitionThe way organisations operate is changing rapidly. Trends suchas globalisation, mobile...
Consumerisation and the tablet surgeWhile most CIOs recognise this gradual shift in the ways ofworking and are considering...
Breaking the silosMore urgently than ever, the challenge for IT is to meet theirorganisation’s new requirements while keep...
What are companies looking for?Enterprise customers are looking for a collaborationinfrastructure that delivers a more int...
The roof consists of three key components:•	 IT strategy, which is designed to address the business requirementsand object...
Centralise management of helpdesk,applications, devices and the networkThe benefits of a more centralised, standardised an...
Demand management:provide a service catalogue to end-users and business unitsAn integrated, cloud-based collaboration towe...
Realizing immediate cost savingsCustomers who spend more than €700,000 on voice per yearcan save on average 25% by combini...
Many organisations have deployed technology from multiplecommunication and collaboration vendors. BT recommendsthat custom...
Besides defining a strategy and fulfilling your organisationalrequirements, BT recommends that companies set a clearIT roa...
BT BelgiumTelecomlaan 91831 DiegemThe telecommunication services and their availability as described in this publication a...
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Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy

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Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy

  1. 1. Supporting the Hyper Efficient Worker:Delivering on a global integratedcollaboration, communication& mobility strategy
  2. 2. More than ever, today’s knowledge workers expect accessto a full range of collaboration tools available from any deviceand location. To address the rapidly evolving needs of theirworkers, BT takes the view that most enterprise customerswill gradually replace their often fragmented communicationsinfrastructure with a centrally managed and globallystandardised collaboration platform.The benefits are undeniable, both from a worker productivityand total-cost-of-ownership perspective.The core challenge for many companies, however, lies inmanaging that transition while protecting legacy investments,keeping costs under control and maintaining security.In this paper, BT outlines a framework termed theCollaboration Tower that helps enterprise customerssuccessfully develop their UCC strategy roadmap.BT finds it important to take a business and user drivenapproach to define and execute on integrated collaborationand communications (UCC) strategies. The successfuldefinition and deployment of an integrated collaborationstrategy entails the following six steps:Executive SummaryCreate a global collaboration practiceDemand management: provide a service cataloguefor end users and business unitsMove to SIP as the key enabler for service integrationDefine a leading technology standardProcure cloud-based technology and servicesExecute on a customised UCC roadmap2Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  3. 3. In the midst of the great transitionThe way organisations operate is changing rapidly. Trends suchas globalisation, mobile working, technology consumerisationand Bring Your Own Device all have a major impact on howpeople interact together to achieve their business objectives.BT is seeing end user driven adoption of increasingly powerfulpersonal and corporate technologies that enable peopleto work together across time and place, and to create andharness knowledge more efficiently than ever.The impact on organisations is profound. Physical spaces arechanging to adapt to the fact that in some companies up to80% of the employees work away from the office. Traditionalorganisational structures are changing as people increasinglywork in international and cross-functional teams.Instantly globalIn their search for growth, many companies are focusing onentering new markets. The world’s economic centre of gravityis moving toward growth markets such as China, India andBrazil. As a result, multinational companies are investing inthese regions via acquisitions and Greenfield investments.This is affecting the way these companies operate.People-centric jobs and processes are becoming globalised.Administration, financial and manufacturing processesare now being operated by virtual teams spread across theworld, making use of low-cost countries in the most optimalways. And while roles and responsibilities are increasinglygeographically dispersed, corporate governance andintellectual property are not and remain central.Context and ChallengesIn some companiesup to 80% of theemployees work awayfrom the office.Supplier and customer relationships are evolving ascompanies discover ever more efficient and intelligent waysof interacting with each other. And underpinning it all, ITand communications infrastructures are enabling a seamlesscollaboration experience, independent of people’s locationand the devices they use. More than ever, users expect tohave a full range of collaboration tools available for anydevice they happen to be using.We highlight the two major trends we see today: globalisationand the surge in tablet use in a business setting.This means managers and executives need to travel largedistances to coordinate and manage their teams.Cloud-based collaboration technologies enable tighterintegration within these companies, making it possible toconnect and collaborate with practically anyone, anywhereinstantly at various levels of real-time interaction: IM, voiceor video. Instant Globalisation has become a reality withthe concept of the cloud. In that regard, IT increasingly isbeing asked to deliver a consistent cloud-based collaborationexperience on a global level. Wherever end-users happen towork or travel, they expect to have access to the corporatenetwork and its resources using any device.3Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  4. 4. Consumerisation and the tablet surgeWhile most CIOs recognise this gradual shift in the ways ofworking and are considering Bring-Your-Own policies, BT findsthat the pace of change is accelerating. At many enterprisecustomers, BT is witnessing a rapid take-up of tablet PCs in thecorporate environment. While users often already had accessto collaboration tools such as Presence and IM viatheir corporate PCs or laptops, many users are discovering thereal value of such tools via the enhanced user experience oftablet PCs.A recent Gartner studyforecasts that unittablet sales will reach337.8 million by 2015.With global sales of tablets projected to soon outstrip those ofdesktop and mobile PCs, this is a trend expected to continue.A recent Gartner study forecasts that unit tablet sales willreach 337.8 million by 2015, outperforming combineddesktop and laptop sales of 292.2 million. Given such figuresit is likely that more corporate users will embrace the tablet astheir primary device.The tablet market is at a tipping point, and this in turnappears to be tipping user’s expectations of their corporatecommunication infrastructure. A truly seamless collaborationexperience that integrates voice, messaging, video andcontent sharing, across all devices and platforms, andprotecting company data, is rapidly becoming the new norm.4Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  5. 5. Breaking the silosMore urgently than ever, the challenge for IT is to meet theirorganisation’s new requirements while keeping costs andsecurity under control. This is, however, no easy task.Until recently, most companies had no choice but to sourcecomponents of their communication infrastructure piecemeal,working with multiple partners for WAN, LAN, cabling,telephony minutes, and video conferencing.Hardware would also need to be purchased locally from avariety of different partners. This typically creates a majoroperational burden for companies since procurement modelsand SLAs will differ, and accountability will be scattered acrossa range of departments and external suppliers.Telephony, for example, is often procured and managed in theregions, while other components are managed centrally by IT.Conferencing services frequently have been procured on an adhoc basis by different departments. Furthermore, few of thesecomponents are effectively integrated with each other, withcreates a cumbersome end-user experience.To an extent, IT consumerisation has made the situation worsebecause people are bringing into the corporate environmenta range of new devices and services with little to no companycontrol. Obviously this is also a tremendous challenge for theinternal IT helpdesk since they need to have the competenciesin-house to support these diverse components.Given the economic malaise, many companies are cuttingcosts, meaning there is tremendous pressure on company’sexisting IT resources and staff.In sum, many companies are finding themselves encumberedby a siloed collaboration infrastructure, as a result of historicaltechnology availability or local procurement budgets.Meanwhile, new devices and collaboration services aregaining traction among users, which in turn is rapidly raisingexpectations of the broader collaboration environment,and placing tremendous pressure on the enterprisecommunications network.WLAN, cellular and network infrastructures need to deliveradditional communication and collaboration services andcapacity while ensuring core business network servicesand security.This raises the pivotal question for IT: how to make thetransition to an integrated communication and collaborationenvironment, while protecting legacy investments, keepingcosts under control, connecting with the corporate securitypolicy and above all managing change for users adapting tothis new collaboration.5Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  6. 6. What are companies looking for?Enterprise customers are looking for a collaborationinfrastructure that delivers a more intuitive, integratedand faster collaboration experience, but that neverthelessmaintains tools that are familiar to end users.From IT’s perspective, a globally consistent service catalogueof collaboration services delivered from the cloud with globalSLAs is required. This should make it easy to roll out newservices and up- or downscale capacity as needed.Finally, companies are looking for a centralised collaborationpractice, incorporating a single helpdesk, centralisedmanagement of user devices and applications, andcentralized visibility of communications costs.The benefits of an integratedcollaboration towerIn BT experience’s, companies that have successfully made thetransition to an integrated communication and collaborationenvironment can expect a wide range of strategic benefits.These include efficiency gains such as 25-40% lower realestate costs per head, lower mobile roaming costs and10-20% increase in productivity. On the human productivityscale BT has seen absenteeism reductions of up to 60%and 30% travel cost reductions. Competitiveness improvesthrough enhanced brand reputation, increased clientsatisfaction, an ability to accelerate through the business cycleThe promise of an integrated collaboration towerEmployee engagementimproves which canincrease employeeretention by up to 20%.and perhaps most importantly for many companies, a fasterpace of innovation. Finally, employee engagement improveswhich can increase employee retention by up to 20%.For IT, the operational burden is significantly reduced and canbe almost entirely centralised. This radically improves costtransparency and in most cases will translate into significantcost reduction.Most importantly, by delivering a seamless collaborationservice, a far superior user experience is created, which willdrive user adoption.• 25-40% lower real estatecost per head• 10-20% increase inproductivity• control mobile costs• reduce human latency• reduce travel costs 30%• absenteeism down 60%• improve resilience tobusiness disruption• enhance client brandreputation• increase clientsatisfaction by 10%• accelerate businesscycle• differentiate throughinnovation• enhance employer brandreputation• improve employeeengagement index• increase employeeretention 20%• improve the sustainabilityof your businessKey efficiencymetricsHuman productivity Competitiveness Employer brand6Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  7. 7. The roof consists of three key components:• IT strategy, which is designed to address the business requirementsand objectives (how do we enable business strategy?);• Demand management (what and how much dowe need to execute on our strategy?);• Governance (which parties do we work with andhow do we manage all these contracts?).BT has developed a framework - termed the Collaboration Tower - for helping multinational enterprise customers organise andimplement UC successfully. The BT Collaboration Tower breaks down geographical barriers and creates new working relationshipswithin the organisations, as well as with internationally dispersed teams, customers and suppliers.The Collaboration Tower describes ICT sourcing as a house consisting of a roof that is supported by four underlying pillars.The house is the total IT budget.The roof covers four pillars of activity:• The helpdesk: responsible for addressingall questions from end-users, including openingand follow-up of trouble tickets and solving outages.• End-user devices: e.g. desktop, fax, telephone,bring-your-own-device, printers.• Applications: including voice, video, conferencingservices, IM/P, softphone, mobile.• Underlying infrastructure and network:this covers the required infrastructure that needs tobe adapted or upgraded to deliver the applications,like WAN, LAN, Wifi, servers and storage.BT finds it important to take a business and user drivenapproach to define and execute on an integrated collaborationand communications (UCC) strategy.The successful definition and deployment of an integratedcollaboration strategy entails the following six steps:Building the integrated collaboration tower1. IT Strategy (Aligned with business)2. Demand management3. IT Governance (multivendor/support alignment)Management of changeEffective and Flexible workforce to result in business benefitsSecurityHELPDESK COLLABORATIONAPPLICATIONSINFRASTRUCTURE& NETWORKEND-USERDEVICES1 Create a global collaboration practice2 Demand management: provide a service catalogue for end users and business units3 Move to SIP as the key enabler for service integration4 Define a leading technology standard5 Procure cloud-based technology and services6 Execute on a customised UCC roadmap7Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  8. 8. Centralise management of helpdesk,applications, devices and the networkThe benefits of a more centralised, standardised andcloud-based approach to managing helpdesk, applications,devices and the network are undeniable. Companies that havebegun migrating components of their collaboration stack tothe cloud will find that they need less equipmentand operational support at local sites.Simultaneously, the centre gains far more visibility and controlover the collaboration services. Clearer lines of responsibilityare established and supplier relationships are simplified.Create a global collaboration practiceBT takes the view that nothing in today’s network andcommunication infrastructure should happen in isolation.Each of the above described components of the CollaborationTower are interlinked and failing to integrate them will resultin poorly performing networks and applications, poor userexperience and higher costs.Develop strategy, roadmap and business caseCompanies should begin by defining their integratedcommunication and collaboration strategy and developinga clear roadmap for the transforming process aligned totheir overall IT Strategy. In order to develop a solid businesscase and roadmap for the deployment of the integratedcollaboration tower, it is tremendously helpful if effort hasbeen made to understand the current communications andcollaboration environment. This can be challenging, especiallywith regard to voice, because it typically is procured andmanaged by local divisions. A company’s service providershould have experience in supporting customers with suchdiscovery projects, for example, by helping IT ask the rightquestions to the right people. Once a more accurate view ofcurrent assets and costs commitments is achieved, it is easierto calculate the cost-benefits of a migration to cloud-basedservices and when such migration should optimally take place.On the benefits side of the cost-benefit analysis,BT recommends focusing on the hard benefits first, especiallyin the areas of roaming, conferencing, outbound voice,TDM-to-SIP consolidation, etc.8Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  9. 9. Demand management:provide a service catalogue to end-users and business unitsAn integrated, cloud-based collaboration tower enables IT to deliver a globally consistent service catalogue of collaboration,mobility and cloud services to business units and end-users. A service catalogue typically consists of the following elements:This framework should allow IT to easily roll out new servicesas needed, and up or downscale capacity in response tobusiness needs. Services are also offered with global SLAs,greatly simplifying management and accountability.From a budgeting perspective, clear cross-charging pathscan be defined so that business units pay for the servicesthey are using. This is especially important in decentralisedorganisations, so that local budgets can be kept in place butlocally procured equipment and services can gradually bereplaced by cloud-based services. Ultimately, however, thecompany’s management will need to take a stand on wherethe company is going with regard to its UC platform;a situation should be avoided where some business units orsites opt out of the centralised platform.BT advises its customers to develop user profiles along thedifferent business units. By understanding the needs ofspecific user segments it is possible to plan, in a targetedmanner, what services should be offered to whom and howthey should interconnect with business processes.Recall that given the rapid pace of technological change,people’s needs will evolve and adapt to achieve new andaccelerated business goals. For example, users considereddesk bound a year ago are now enthusiastic users of tablets.Also, given the range of available services, it will make littlesense to offer everything to everybody. In other words, do notblanket people with services.Finally, user adoption should be the core performance metricof the collaboration tower, a metric that is easily tracked in amanaged, cloud-based environment.For example, previous use of company’s video conferencingfacilities were rarely monitored effectively, but in a managedenvironment usage is systematically monitored and analysedin context of the broader set of collaboration services.In response, specific tools can be deployed that let companiesdrive adoption in ways that were impossible in the past.9Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategyTechnologyNetwork services Mobile devicemanagementAudio, weband videoconferencingMobile videoconferencingConferencingpodsCollaborationroomManaged printand imagingKnowledgeworker toolson demandPresence & awarenessand instant messagingData centre and cloud computingConsolidated service and contract: pay-per-user commercialsKnowledge managementPeople & Skills finderTelecoms expensemanagementMobile app storeSecuritySecure remoteaccessSite IP telephonyCloud IP telephonyIP telephonyover mobileWi-FiAlways connected Always managedAlways productive
  10. 10. Realizing immediate cost savingsCustomers who spend more than €700,000 on voice per yearcan save on average 25% by combining voice and global VPNtraffic and moving to SIP Trunking to eliminate voice accessnetwork infrastructure costs.Further cost savings can be realized by connecting your voicenetwork to a global Telecom provider such as BT, enablingcompanies to have outbound voice at the best available ratesto any destination.To illustrate, Prudential recently aggregated its voice channelsacross the UK saving the company over €115,000 per annumon line-rental charges alone. Additionally annual maintenanceand support savings of around €467,000 are forecast once thelegacy PBXs are fully decommissioned.Move to SIP – the key enabler for services integrationEnterprises are replacing legacy TDM telephone networks with more efficient and cost-effective end-to-end IP networks.SIP lowers voice costs and brings resilience, flexibility, and a roadmap to feature-rich multimedia. UC will be an application ona data network, engineered to high levels of performance for voice and accommodating the growth in video.By converging voice, video and data onto a common IP network, businesses can consolidate and centralise their infrastructure;at the same time, operations, administrations and maintenance are streamlined.By moving to SIP, it enables businesses of all sizes to connect autonomously to IP telephony islands, protect and extend previousinvestments and overcome multi-vendor, multi-protocol interoperability issues brought on by decentralised purchasing decisions,mergers and acquisitions.Benefits and Myths for SIP-ServicesBenefits:• Many corporates have invested in voice ready MPLSWAN infrastructure• Voice traffic carried on net site-to-site is free of charge• SIP is the standard of choice for inbound and outboundservices on converged networks• Avoid point-to-point trunking and instead consider fullymeshed and global reach for fixed/mobile traffic• Managed as service• Reduce other access charges – for example adoptionof on-net conferencing.Myths:• Moving from TDM to SIP will cost more• Legacy alarms and fax will not work on SIP• Reduced voice quality10Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  11. 11. Many organisations have deployed technology from multiplecommunication and collaboration vendors. BT recommendsthat customers choose one or two anchor vendors.The choice of vendor will depend on the needs of end-users(which tools are they familiar with?, how is the organisation’scommunication culture evolving?), the needs of the business(what processes need to be supported by collaboration tools?),and is the existing infrastructure in place.Benefits for this approach are multiple: it reduces complexity,simplifies the user experience and resulting in overall costsavings by consolidating maintenance, leveraging economiesof scale and licensing discounts.To the cloud, while protecting legacyBT finds that companies increasingly seek to procurecollaboration tools as a service and on a utility basis. In thatregard, companies are moving to cloud-based offerings thatare managed on an end-to-end basis. While a centralised,cloud-based approach makes sense, many corporates haveinvested in converged communications infrastructure suchas IP Telephony. When companies have made such significantinvestments, it makes sense to merge these platformswith new centralized UC platforms through a secure E-SBC(Enterprise Session border Controller) layer allowing adoptionof the cloud while protecting large IPT investments.In this scenario the company will obviously still need a clearvision of where it ultimately is going with communication andcollaboration and let that vision drive what is invested in.Procure cloud-based technology and servicesEnsure governance:assess your service provider’s global capabilitiesDelivering a cloud-based collaboration platform on a globalbasis requires significant capabilities and global presence.It requires ownership of a comprehensive systems and servicesstack, partnerships with the leading collaboration vendors andregulatory approval to run SIP services in numerous countries.It is worth conducting a thorough evaluation of prospectiveservice providers upfront so as to avoid problems later on.Security: know where your data isMoving to a globalised and integrated collaborationenvironment does have security implications. Simply put, yourdata will be dispersed on multiple devices (both corporate andpersonal devices), systems (in the cloud and in the office) andlocations. The challenge, therefore, is to keep track of whereyour data is, protect it from internal and external threats, andensure compliance with regulation. Also important is that yoursecurity measures enable you to do more, not less.To address these challenges, BT advises its customers toembed security principles in the organisation’s technology,processes and policies. This is not something that should bebolted on as an afterthought. For example, security of mobiledevices can be integrated in a company’s cloud-based mobiledevice management platform. This simplifies the managementof all stages of the mobile application lifecycle, making iteasier to support constantly changing applications, operatingsystems and devices.Hybrid ArchitectureBT finds that a big-bang approach to implementing acollaboration platform is inadvisable. Instead, we recommendan approach that protects legacy investments.Existing equipment should be utilised so customers cancontinue to benefit from the capital investment they havealready made.Define your technology standard:choose one or two leadingtechnology vendors“Many companies have video room based systems that areunderutilised because of lack of training of the end-users,lack of working set-up. In a global video bridging service,these systems can be booked, proactively managed andinterconnected to both company and partner networkswhile being integrated to other audio/video/webcollaboration services.”Jerry Teahan,Director Solutions Sales - Europe at BT Global ServicesTherefore, customers require enterprise UCC solutions thatare integrated with existing and third party equipment.This integration needs to be global, across multiple vendors,and managed end-to-end.While the hybrid architecture approach is good for a certaintime period, customers will eventually smoothly transitionto the newly declared vendor standards.11Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  12. 12. Besides defining a strategy and fulfilling your organisationalrequirements, BT recommends that companies set a clearIT roadmap for UCC. These are lessons that BT has learnedthrough its track record in UCC infrastructure design andintegrations.BT typically advises three steps to create a converged andintegrated collaboration and communications infrastructure.1. Consolidate legacy:rationalise existing estate and consolidate infrastructurethat comprise a mixture of technologies, contracts andvendor equipment2 Converge technologies:migrate to a converged WAN and LAN and examine voiceintegration options and full IP telephony3. Extend to UCC:select the technology options that suits your business anduser needs best, such as Microsoft, Avaya or Cisco. Andchoose your service delivery methods (e.g. hosted and/ormanaged), and professional SI partner, like BT Advise.Execute on a customisedUCC roadmapTransform theinfrastructureProven BT RoadmapBusinessefficiency,agility&customerexperienceTransitionMulti-channelsand collaborationExtendedcollaborativemulti-channel platformGlobal convergedmulti-channel-readyinfrastructureConsolidateontoSingle (global) networkWhen it came to voice services for the London 2012 Olympicand Paralympic Games, it was natural that calls would becarried as IP traffic between the 94 venues, including 34competition arenas.“The London 2012 voice architecture of choice, BT OneCloud, hosted IP telephony had already proved highlysuccessful in major public and private organisations,” saysHannah Wignall of the BT London 2012 Delivery Programmeteam. This well-proven architecture is highly scalable andoffers advanced features while saving money by keepingcalls off the public network. And during Games-time,London 2012 would become the largest BT One Cloudcustomer implementation project in history.Hannah Wignall sums up: “The BT One Cloud serviceoffered a total plug-and-play capability and, along withthe BT IP Connect wide area network, provided virtually100 percent availability.”Case study: the London 2012 OlympicsConvergePlatform for truebusiness agilityExtendEnabling improvedcollaboration internallyand with customersConsolidateGreater controlDisparateMultiple SLAsand vendors12Delivering on a global integrated collaboration, communication & mobility strategy
  13. 13. BT BelgiumTelecomlaan 91831 DiegemThe telecommunication services and their availability as described in this publication are subject tochange. Services and hardware are supplied in accordance with the standard terms and conditionsof contract of BT Worldwide Ltd. Nothing in this publication may be construed as being part of acontract. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced and/or published by means of printing,microfilm, electronically or in any other way without the prior written consent of BT Worldwide Ltd.BT is a registered trade mark of British Telecommunications plc.© British Telecommunications plc, 2013Registered office: 81 Newgate Street, London EC1A 7AJ.Registered in England under number 1800000.Publisher: Griet Bruyninckx, Marketing Communications Manager, griet.bruyninckx@bt.comBT NetherlandsOffices MinervaHerikerbergweg 21101 CM Amsterdam Zuid-Oost - The NetherlandsInterested to learn more about how BT can help youin defining and executing on your UCC strategy and roadmap?Contact us for more information:Netherlands: +31 (0)88 212 8000Belgium: +32 (0)2 700 22 11Luxembourg: +352 (0)40 56 37e-mail: info@bt.beFollow us on twitter: twitter.com/btletstalk_bnlJoin the discusison on linkedin: www.bt.com/be/linkedinVisit our blog: http://letstalk.globalservices.bt.com

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