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Lesson 1: Doing College Level Research
 

Lesson 1: Doing College Level Research

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An introduction to doing college level research at Duquesne

An introduction to doing college level research at Duquesne

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    Lesson 1: Doing College Level Research Lesson 1: Doing College Level Research Presentation Transcript

    • CPRG 105: Lesson 1 Doing College Level Research
    • Checklist of College Student Skills: These are the information literacy skills that college professors expect college-bound students to have. GENERAL o o o Know what they don’t know Know whom to ask for research help Understand library jargon, e.g., “peer-reviewed” RESEARCH PROCESS & QUESTIONS o o o Follow research process steps, e.g., Badke model Estimate time required for research, e.g., time for Inter Library loan Define a research question or topic that’s not shallow or “pop” SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION o o o o o o o o o Find different formats of information Understand that Web search engines rarely locate college-appropriate information Distinguish between OPACs and online databases Conduct effective searches using – o o o o Keywords, alternate search terms Boolean operators, e.g., AND and OR Controlled vocabulary, subject headings Field searching, e.g., author, title Interpret search results, e.g., book chapters vs. articles Find full text articles Find books using Library of Congress (LC) classification, not Dewey Use reference (and e-reference) books in the library Regroup when first attempts to find resources don’t work, e.g., try a different database or try different search terms or search strings EVALUATING INFORMATION o o o o Weed through search results to find relevant and accurate information Evaluate information using standard evaluation criteria, e.g., the CARS model Distinguish between popular and scholarly articles Disregard inadequate or inaccurate information
    •  Cycle of Information  Types of Sources  Scholarly vs. Popular  Intro to Citation  Gumberg Library Website
    • Event Happens Turn on the News Books Newspapers Scholarly Journals Magazines
    • Websites Books Articles
    • Journal articles/ Scholarly books Written by experts Based on research Scholarly Longer, harder to read Magazines, Newspapers, Most websites Popular Written by anyone Based on opinion/ Reporting Shorter, easier to read
    • I want you to use Peer Reviewed Scholarly Journal Articles!
    • 1.Subject matter expert writes an article. 2. Submits it to a scholarly journal . 3. Article is reviewed by scholars who are also subject matter experts on this topic (i.e., peers). 4. If accepted, article is then published in the scholarly journal.
    • “To cite, or not to cite… THAT is the question!”
    •   Librarian HOW to cite is usually more of a problem!
    • MLA, 7th edition APA, 6th edition
    • A Style Comparison: MLA vs. APA NOTE: Citations in a Works Cited list (MLA) or a Reference list (APA) should be double spaced and formatted with hanging indents. Category Overview of Style: Current Edition: MLA The Modern Language Association (MLA) provides a way for citing sources that is used in the liberal arts and most humanities courses. English uses MLA. The liberal arts and humanities place emphasis on authorship. 7th edition APA The American Psychological Association (APA) provides a way for citing sources that is used in psychology and most social science courses. At Duquesne, Business, Education, and Nursing also use APA style. These areas place emphasis on the date a work was created. 6th edition AUTHOR FORMAT: Single author Badke, William. Badke, W. Two authors Smith, John A., and Susan B. Jones. Smith, J. A., & Jones, S. B. Three authors Smith, John A., Susan B. Jones, and Thomas C. Wesson. Smith, J. A., Jones, S. B., & Wesson, T. C. Four to seven authors Smith, John A., et al. Smith, J. A., Jones, S. B., Wesson, T. C., & Clark, W. D. More than seven authors Smith, John A., et al. Smith, J. A., Jones, S. B., Wesson, T. C., Clark, W. D., Duncan, R. E., Ewell, S. F., . . . Godard, T. P. NOTE: Use first author followed by et al. for four or more authors. NOTE: You list the first seven authors, then three spaced ellipses, and then the LAST author’s name. American Library Association. American Library Association. Corporate/organization author Gumberg Library, Duquesne University 08/01/12 1
    •  AUTHOR Information  TITLE Information  Publication DATE  PUBLISHING Information
    •  # 1 – Intro to Citation  # 2 – In-text Citations       # 3 – How to cite a WEB SOURCE # 4 – How to cite a SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ARTICLE # 5 – How to cite a NEWSPAPER/MAGAZINE/ TRADE PUBLICATION ARTICLE # 6 – How to cite BOOK/eBOOK # 7 – How to cite a CHAPTER/SECTION in a BOOK/eBOOK #8 – How to format a BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • MLA Style APA Style
    • http://www.duq.edu/library