Educating for OurCommon Future:Building Schools for an Integrated SocietyA Guide Book for Principals and TeachersDEPARTMEN...
Cover Image:                                          Back Cover Image:Jénine Swanepoel, 9. Senior Phase, Free            ...
AcknowledgementsThis guide book has been produced by the Department of Education. It takes its guidance in thefirst instan...
The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa,(Act 108 of 1996),was approved by the Constitutional Court (CC) on 4 Dece...
Contents1 Foreword.........................................pg 1   4 Signposts -                                           ...
6 Taking the School                                 8 When the Pot is Simmering or  on a Journey-                         ...
1   Foreword    Foreword    Recent media and research reports suggest    that despite major advances achieved since    the...
Introduction   2IntroductionSouth Africa has achieved a miracle by ensuring      we can safely say that the vision express...
3   Introduction    which to respond to the challenges and potential             The need for integration poses complex   ...
Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools   4     Reflection                       3The Reality of Our Schools
5   Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools    Integration since 1994                                   still remains a ch...
Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools   6• discriminatory practices with regard to              Poem against Xenophobia ...
7   Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools    how we see ourselves and how we treat each                         South Af...
Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools    8of change with regard to language, he used the                      Denial of ...
9   Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools    Dangers of celebrating difference                        2   are, it’s me, ...
Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools   10Teacher’s attitudes affect academic                        2   Not all schools...
11   Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools     • As an individual, do you practise direct or                      Refere...
Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools   12                     Signposts                                ...
13   Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools     The Vision of a Non-racial                               ...
Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools   14   “enabling the education system to contribute      An Inclus...
15   Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools     any educator establishment shall be with due             ...
Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools   16Questions for FurtherReflection• When discussing these policie...
17   Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools
Portrait of an Integrated School   18               5     Portrait of anIntegrated School
19   Portrait of an Integrated School     What a Casual Visitor Would                               song which begins:The ...
Portrait of an Integrated School   20Diversity benefits all                                              2    devised ways...
21   Portrait of an Integrated School     to share information and insights about their        The Ethos of an Integrated ...
Portrait of an Integrated School   22The school has embraced change                                                  have ...
23   Portrait of an Integrated School
Taking the Whole School on a Journey - Strategies for Transformation   24   Taking the Whole                              ...
25   Taking the Whole School on a Journey - Strategies for Transformation     A successfully integrated school is one whic...
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
Principal teacher guide
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Principal teacher guide

  1. 1. Educating for OurCommon Future:Building Schools for an Integrated SocietyA Guide Book for Principals and TeachersDEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
  2. 2. Cover Image: Back Cover Image:Jénine Swanepoel, 9. Senior Phase, Free Artwork by Marthinus Engelbrecht, Gr8State, Hoërskool Sasolburg Hoërskool Die Adelaar, GautengTitel: “Unity in Diversity - we have strength Title: “Whichever way you look at it,in variety.” whatever the race: All is equal.”Copyright Department of Education 2001All rights reserved. You may copy material from this publication for use in non-profit educationprogrammes if you acknowledge the source. For use in publications, please obtain the written permissionof the Department of Education.Enquiries:Director-GeneralDepartment of EducationSol Plaatje House123 Schoeman StreetPRETORIAPrivate Bag X895PRETORIA0001Tel: (012) 312 5080Fax: (012) 326 1909E-mail: values@doe.gov.zaDesign and layout: Lamberts.kretzschmar Design and Advertising (012) 342 8906Printed for the Government Printer Pretoria by Formeset Printers Cape
  3. 3. AcknowledgementsThis guide book has been produced by the Department of Education. It takes its guidance in thefirst instance from the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (1996) and the White Paperon Education and Training (1995), as well as the more specific suggestions and ideas containedin the Manifesto on Values, Education and Democracy (DoE, 2001). It has drawn extensivelyfrom existing resources, especially Building Integrated Classrooms: An Educator’s Workbookproduced by the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) in 2002 and SchoolManagement Teams: Managing Diversity produced by the Department of Education in 2000.Extensive information collated in visits by the Department to schools in five provinces in 2003was also used in the production of this book.Chapter 7 is drawn almost entirely from School Management Teams: Managing Diversity, fromsection 4.3, ‘Dealing with Conflict in Managing Diversity’.Quotations in boxes that are not acknowledged are comments that have been made by individualsdirectly to the DoE team producing the book.
  4. 4. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa,(Act 108 of 1996),was approved by the Constitutional Court (CC) on 4 December 1996 and took effect on 4 February 1997.PREAMBLEWe, the people of South Africa,Recognise the injustices of our past;Honour those who suffered for justice and freedom in our land;Respect those who have worked to build and develop our country; andBelieve that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity.We therefore, through our freely elected representatives, adopt this Constitution as the supreme law ofthe Republic so as to Heal the divisions of the past and establish a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights; Lay the foundations for a democratic and open society in which government is based on the will of the people and every citizen is equally protected by law; Improve the quality of life of all citizens and free the potential of each person; and Build a united and democratic South Africa able to take its rightful place as a sovereign state in the family of nations.May God protect our people.Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika. Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso.God seën Suid-Afrika. God bless South Africa.Mudzimu fhatutshedza Afurika. Hosi katekisa Afrika.
  5. 5. Contents1 Foreword.........................................pg 1 4 Signposts - The Policies Guiding2 Introduction ....................................pg 2 Integration in Schools ...................pg 12 • Integration since 1994 • The Vision of a Non-Racial, • Purpose of this Book United and Democratic • Questions for Further Reflection South Africa • Access3 Reflection - • An Inclusive Approach The Reality of Our Schools ...........pg 4 • Employment of Educators • Challenges Facing Education: • Curriculum Racial Discrimination • Questions for Further Reflection • What is ‘race’? • Different Shades of Racism 5 Portrait of an • Discrimination Leaves a Integrated School...........................pg 18 Lasting Imprint • What a Casual Visitor Would See • Where do We Go to from Here? • The Ethos of an Integrated School • Questions for Further Reflection • Questions for Reflection
  6. 6. 6 Taking the School 8 When the Pot is Simmering or on a Journey- When the House is on Fire – Strategies for Transformation.......pg 24 Dealing with Conflict......................pg 42 • Acknowledge the Need for Action • When the Pot is Simmering: • Call in a Facilitator Dealing with Conflict in the • Assess the Problem Integrated School • Get the Views of all Role-Players • Teaching Conflict Resolution • Set up a Task Team to Work on a Draft • • When the House is on Fire: Strategy the Path of Conflict • Get Support for the Strategy • Some Guidelines for Dealing • Set up a Group for Implementation and • with Conflict Monitoring • The End of the Line • Review Progress of the Strategy • Questions for Reflection • Questions for Reflection 9 Resource Agencies ........................pg 487 Towards a Common Future – Promoting Integration Amongst our Youth ........................pg 32 • Strategies from the Manifesto on Values, Education and Democracy • Practical Ideas • Signs of Racism Amongst Learners • Questions for Reflection Educating for Our Common Future: Building Schools for an Integrated Society A Guide Book for Principals and Teachers
  7. 7. 1 Foreword Foreword Recent media and research reports suggest that despite major advances achieved since the first democratic elections, the educational experiences of a number of learners in South African schools are still dominated by the spectre of race. This is despite the fact that we have dismantled the apartheid legislative framework that institutionalised racism in the education system. We have always recognised that the first phase of I strongly believe that education is an essential educational reconstruction in the post-apartheid aspect of meeting the challenges posed by era would be about creating the framework integration. The motto of our Coat of Arms, “!ke within which the apartheid legacy could be e: /xarra / / ke” which literally means “diverse confronted and dealt with. Apartheid and its people unite” reminds us of our historic duty to brutal legacy however still haunt the nation’s respect the desires, needs and dreams of all those classrooms. The first decade of freedom has who enter our schools and classrooms. We cannot taught us, often very sharply , that life in the new live successfully as communities and as a nation South Africa has its own challenges, sometimes if we do not respect each other’s differences, very similar to the challenges of the past. One whilst recognising how these diverse elements such lesson is that real renewal can only occur shape the road ahead into unity and our common if teachers, managers, parents and communities destiny. recognise the importance of changing the old ways of doing things. This implies commitment This is the first in a series of publications that is to redress, equity and transformation at an aimed at assisting our schools to deal with issues institutional level. of integration. I hope that school communities will find this publication useful and that it will The importance of this guide book is that it contribute to the building of more integrated recognises that systemic change can only occur schools and communities. Only by combining if teachers, school governing bodies, managers our efforts will we be able to rid our schools and and local communities commit themselves to communities of the scourge of racism. Nation- the change process. Accordingly, the guide book building and reconciliation are the challenges recognises that the role of all stakeholders is that we must be involved in. But first, we must vital if racial integration is to be successfully exorcise all manifestations of prejudice, which achieved. Furthermore, the book acknowledges leads to discrimination. that contexts and conditions differ and that a “one-size-fits-all” approach is necessarily doomed to failure. It provides guidelines and suggestions on how to deal with the challenges of integration without being dogmatic or prescriptive. The strength of this publication is Prof Kader Asmal, MP that it encourages school communities to reflect Minister of Education on their own situations and to find their own January 2004 solutions in line with the values and principles of our Constitution.
  8. 8. Introduction 2IntroductionSouth Africa has achieved a miracle by ensuring we can safely say that the vision expressed in oura peaceful transition from a racially divided past Constitution has been shared with all educatorsto a stable democracy. This is nowhere more and that this vision has been realised in all ourevident than in our education system. In the short institutions. One aspect of this vision that stillspace of 10 years, we have made the change from has to be realised, is that of a truly non-racial18 racially divided Departments of Education, school system, where every school is eitherto one National Department, with 9 Provincial racially integrated, or preparing students to liveDepartments of Education, each guided by the in a integrated society.Constitution of the Republic of South Africa anda unitary set of policy documents. The school has a significant role to play in ensuring that our learners are equipped to becomeDespite the existence of progressive and far- proud and active citizens in post-apartheid Southsighted policies, and despite the relatively Africa. The school is a microcosm of society. Itpeaceful transition to a non-racial democracy, is the springboard from which learners acquirethere is a great deal of work to be done before the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes with
  9. 9. 3 Introduction which to respond to the challenges and potential The need for integration poses complex presented by our rich and varied multicultural challenges, and responses which are appropriate society. The failure to utilize schools to to the specific contexts. When strategies are contribute to a common future represents a implemented, new and unanticipated challenges short-sighted and stunted approach to education. present themselves. For these reasons the book provides comments, hints and suggestions, but “We are convinced” 2 not an actual recipe for change. A book cannot We are convinced that as a people, both black and provide readers with all the ideas and support white, we have the wisdom, ingenuity and sensitivity required to embark on an extensive course of to the human condition that will drive us to overcome action with regard to integration. For further the demon of racism. support, readers should use some of the resources President Mbeki indicated in Chapter 8, especially on in-service training and human rights and the curriculum. Purpose of the Book The aim of this guideline book is to support Questions for Further principals, School Management Teams (SMTs), Reflection School Governing Bodies (SGBs) and teachers to develop schools which are aligned to the • How will you use this book at your school? principles of the Constitution, in particular, to the principle of non-racialism. (Will you get other educators and parents to discuss it with you?) Achieving racial integration requires change at an individual as well as institutional level. The References book should have an impact on your vision of yourself: Centre for the Study of Violence and • that you understand how you can guide your Reconciliation (CSVR) 2002. learners towards living in an integrated and Building Integrated Classrooms; an Educators’ united South Africa; Guide. Johanneshburg: CSVR. • that you understand difference, see it as a strength and an opportunity; Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, • that you acknowledge conflict and problems, 1996. but see for yourself a constructive role in dealing with these; and Department of Education (DoE) 2001. • that you see yourself as a leader, guiding Manifesto on Values, Education and Democracy. learners to a common future, in a journey in which you learn alongside others. Pretoria. The book focuses on contexts of mixed race Department of Education (DoE) 2000. schools, but it provides advice for all schools in School Management Teams: Managing Diversity. South Africa, as all schools should teach learners Pretoria. how to live and work in a non-racial society. The book looks at other forms of division Department of Education (DoE) 1995. and discrimination which present a challenge Education and Training White Paper. in education as well, for example, ethnicism, Pretoria. xenophobia or discrimination towards people living with HIV/AIDS.
  10. 10. Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools 4 Reflection 3The Reality of Our Schools
  11. 11. 5 Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools Integration since 1994 still remains a challenge to ensure that all schools teach learners how to learn and live together in The integration of schools in South Africa mutual understanding and harmony. since the end of apartheid in 1994, is a shining example of how ordinary people can embrace Nine years after the first democratic election, change. The relative ease of this transition there is still much evidence that racism exists in from segregated to desegregated schooling is our schools. in no small measure due to the cooperation and goodwill of managers, teachers and parents. In 1999, it was reported that the South African Evidence of this transition is that: Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) legal department received the second highest number • a total of eighteen educational departments of complaints regarding racism, from the based on race, province and homeland education sector. In a study conducted by the administrations, have been amalgamated SAHRC in 1999, 62% of the 1 700 learners into one national and nine provincial surveyed from ex-Model C (white), House departments; of Representatives (coloured) and House of • students write common matriculation Delegates (Indian) Department high schools, felt examinations in each province, based on a that there were racial problems at their schools. common national curriculum; and The report includes reports of racism towards • many schools now have students from a students as well as minority black teachers. variety of language and race backgrounds. While noting the attempts made by some schools to integrate, including certain schools ‘Magnificent spirit of acceptance’ 2 whose practices should be studied as models of good practice, a Mpumalanga Department of The happy mix that we have now, where our Education study (2001) observed the following enrolments are over-subscribed every year, is an exclusionary practices at schools: astonishing transformation and one that bears testimony to the magnificent spirit of acceptance and respect that we can enjoy in South Africa today. • exclusive use of a language, usually Afrikaans, Sunnyridge Primary School received a Presidential which learners cannot understand; National Award for Racial Integration on 13 March • exclusion of learners by charging high fees; 2003 at the Most Improved Schools Award Ceremony • recruitment of learners from outside the held at the Presidential Guest House in Arcadia, Pretoria. We are extremely proud of this. catchment area to keep black learners out; Own source • scheduling of SGB meetings at times when black parents cannot attend; • no provision of the dominant African language as a first language subject; Challenges facing Education: • staff profile being predominantly or exclusively Racial Discrimination white, while the learner profile is mixed; • encouraging black and white learners to sit The integration of schools did not occur without separately at assembly or during breaks; problems. It remains a challenge to ensure • imposing a foreign culture on black students, that all learners share the same opportunities for example with regard to “ontgroening” to receive a good quality education, and it still (initiation); remains a challenge to ensure that schools • limited provision of sporting codes, for provide equal access to all learners who live example soccer; within a school’s vicinity, irrespective of social • amalgamation of schools into combined class or colour. It remains a challenge to ensure schools in a single set of premises, to avoid that schools treat all learners with respect, and it integrating;
  12. 12. Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools 6• discriminatory practices with regard to Poem against Xenophobia 2 discipline for different race groups; and• discouraging or preventing black learners Don’t hate me because I come from a different from studying mathematics or commerce in land.Don’t hate me because I’m smart and you don’t understand,Because I speak a different language the higher grade. and live a certain way.Don’t hate me because I’m better at a sport that you play.Don’t look at me withDefining Racism and Racial piercing eyes when you see me walk by.Don’t curse me when I retaliate and then wonder why.RememberDiscrimination when I knocked at your door and you did not let me in,Because I’m the incorrect nationality and haveIn 1965 the General Assembly of the United the wrong colour skin.Some hate me for what I stand for and some for who I am.Some hate meNations adopted the International Convention because of envy and some hate me because theyon the Elimination of All Forms of Racial can,But whatever your reason is, think before youDiscrimination. Here racism is defined as any do,Because the next person that decides to tour mydistinction, exclusion, restriction or preference country could be you!based on race, colour, descent or national or Samkele Tsipa, Produced for the Schools’ Competition to mark World Refugee Day,ethnic origin, which has the purpose or effect 20 June 2002of nullifying or impairing the recognition,enjoyment or exercise, on an equal footing, What is ‘race’?of human rights and fundamental freedoms inpolitical, economic, social, cultural or any other There exists no scientific basis for the racialfield of private life. classification of human beings. Biologically speaking, people with different colour skins,Racial discrimination in the school setting can be heights or facial features are all members of thedefined as the intentional or unintentional denial human race.of the right to participate fully in the educationprocess - or the denial of the dignity or self- Humanity originated in South Africa 2expression - of an individual learner, educator,manager or parent or group, on the basis of As a result of rigorous investigations by numerousrace. scientists, spanning many years, we now know that: • South Africa and other African countries haveThis book refers to racism, racial discrimination yielded fossils that prove beyond any doubt that humans originated in Africa, and it was in Africaand discrimination, as it is not always easy to that they began to walk on two feet and developedmake distinctions between these phrases. Racism the ability to adapt continuously to their changingin South Africa has been demonstrated by conditions;individuals from all communities: African, white, • modern technology originated in East Africa, whereIndian and coloured. However, since racism is the first stone tools were manufactured and used; • our early human ancestors first controlled andexperienced most sharply in situations where it is made fire in South Africa.aligned with differences of power and resources,and since it was legislated by a white power Foreword by Thabo Mbeki to The Official Guide to the Cradle of Humankind, Hilton- Barber and Berger 2002block in the form of apartheid, racism is still mostcommonly associated with attitudes of ‘whites’ In the last two to three centuries, we havetowards ‘blacks’. It is important to bear in mind developed the habit of treating people differently,that other forms of discrimination do occur, for according to the racial categories that we haveexample, tribalism, ethnicism, xenophobia or developed. The impact of discrimination basedsexism. A community might bear the brunt of on individuals’ superficial features, is that peopleracial discrimination, but this does not mean experience life’s opportunities differently.that it itself does not practise a different form of Although the idea of ‘race’ is not based ondiscrimination, for example, xenophobia. scientific truth, it is real in the sense that it affects
  13. 13. 7 Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools how we see ourselves and how we treat each South Africa” said the SGB chairperson. According other. Because we have not yet developed an to the provincial spokesperson, allegations that black and white Learners’ Representative Council adequate vocabulary to deal with our common (LRC) members were seated separately during their identity as South Africans, and because we are inauguration function, were “unfounded”, as the still grappling with change, we still use old children themselves chose to sit apart, and some categories that sometimes cause discomfort, black pupils and their parents walked out in protest. such as “black”, “Indian”, “coloured” or “white”. Racial tension peaked at the school in 1996 when These words will therefore be used in this book. education authorities started integrating black and white pupils. Different Shades of Racism A black pupil was arrested after allegedly stabbing a white girl because she allegedly called him a “kaffir”, Discrimination varies in both degree and kind. and the school tried to expel a Grade 8 pupil when he An extreme version is when principals simply accidentally touched a white girl’s breast. refuse to accept certain pupils to their schools, or when pupils refuse to accept certain teachers, on Black parents complain that white pupils regularly use derogatory language, and that their children the basis of race, poverty or ethnic affiliation. are discriminated against by the largely Afrikaans- speaking staff. Teachers chased away 2 The two boys subsequently appeared before a Schooling has been disrupted at a rural Mpumalanga disciplinary hearing and according to the provincial school after learners closed off the entrance to get rid spokesperson, “They showed remorse for their of two white teachers and their principal. … Placard actions and were [strongly] reprimanded”. wielding, toy-toying students surprised teachers amalgamation of two 2003 newspaper articles when they blockaded the entrance with stones, burning tyres and furniture last Thursday. They also chanted, “Kill the boer! Kill the white!” Sometimes principals or teachers discriminate Daily Sun 23 July 2003 against pupils without realizing they are being racist. Another extreme or visible kind of discrimination 2 Discrimination in the classroom is when learners or their communities resort to violence. This is often the result of managers not If, in class, the teacher sees me talking with Menzi, acting when there are problems, or being seen to maybe we are talking about work, he or she will send take the side of one group. the black kid out of the classroom and leave me to continue, even if I am the one who is wrong. Racial tension spirals 2 Department of Education 2000 p. 54 At Ben Viljoen High School in Mpumalanga Province, two white pupils waved the old South African flag and swore and spat at their black schoolmates. Sometimes racism is exhibited by sheer The education department overruled a school- indifference or contempt for the suffering or governing body (SGB) decision to merely reprimand need for human dignity of people of another the boys and ordered that the pupils undergo a colour. disciplinary hearing. “We received the SGB’s report but decided that the policies of the South African Schools Act (SASA) be followed”, said a provincial Indifference towards needs of learners 2 spokesperson. A small number of teachers, particularly in English The SGB chairperson said the two pupils had been and Afrikaans contexts, expressed indifference or acting in response to provocation by some black annoyance. A case in point is the principal of a pupils. “We spoke to both kids and their parents, and conservative high school. … When he was asked explained that their actions were not good for the new how the school was responding to the challenges
  14. 14. Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools 8of change with regard to language, he used the Denial of difference is a short-term andmetaphor of an uninvited guest. He reported that the superficial approach, as it does not take intoschool did not have a problem with other learners, account the complexity of social relations acrossexcept those who had come to the school ‘throughthe window’. According to him, there was no colour, religious or linguistic boundaries.language support programme in the school because‘if learners choose to come here, they must learn to You cannot ignore colour 2cope’. Department of Education 2000 p. 53/4 In the beginning I used to say, “we must forget about colour”, but if we just keep quiet, those suspicions we have don’t come out. If we say all children are the same, of which they are not, we cannot handle themRacism or discrimination can also be the same way. For example black children come indemonstrated by denying that there is any and sit down, as they don’t want to be higher thandifference between learners of different groups. you. White children will wait until they are asked to be seated. So we have to understand differentThis is sometimes referred to as “colour backgrounds. We must talk about it, with respect.blindness”. The school also has cultural days and food stalls every year. We have to talk about our differences,Race was denied, but living in the room 2 even the children. You cannot ignore colour, but you cannot just concentrate on it. We have commonI just wanted to comment on a multiracial school in values that we share.the Eastern Cape. No one talked of race or racism, Interview with principal of a school which won an award for racial integationbut there was a tone among educators that reflecteda clash of stereotypes and perceptions rooted inour past. These were the same educators whopretended as if race was not part of the reality of Discrimination is also caused when teachers ortheir schools, articulating a common line when race principals generalize about individuals, labelwas raised as an issue, ‘black or white, children are students or make assumptions about them.all the same’. But black children were regarded as They do not explore the issues in any detail, but‘disrespectful’. I noticed that some of the examplesthey gave, demonstrated different understandings advance their own explanations.of respect. They said that it was disrespectful for alearner to sing in the hallways. They said that black Seeing children as deficient 2learners did not ‘respect property’ because theynever brought their own scissors and were always A teacher from an [English language] high schoolborrowing other learners’ scissors. There was also described some learners as not ‘culturally enriched’,a funny race dynamic about parental involvement. while another referred to African-language speakersWhite parents and white educators said that ‘black as learners from an ‘input deprived’ background.parents don’t care about education’. Black parentsexpressed a hesitation to participate in school life Department of Education 2000 p. 53because of unstated rules, which they felt judged by.There were all these ways in which ‘race’ was denied,and yet was living in the room. Attempts to celebrate diversity at a school can Department of Education 2002 p. 35 also lead to a form of racism, for example when the school emphasizes superficial differences, such as food or dress, at the expense of deeperThe problem with “colour blindness” is that issues of power, and the fact that learnersdenying difference does not help to deal with the do not always like to be singled out for theirchallenges it poses. In situations where difference differences.is denied, one culture, usually the most powerful,dominates. Other cultures are repressed and subtleforms of discrimination often flourish. Theseoccur even in situations where the managementbelieves it has done what it should, in order toensure school integration.
  15. 15. 9 Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools Dangers of celebrating difference 2 are, it’s me, I must just learn to live with this.” It is clumsily also difficult if you keep complaining because you draw attention to yourself in a context where you are expected to conform. My daughter was very upset about an incident that happened at her school, where the teacher asked her Own source to prepare a song from her Zulu culture to sing at the school. But she doesn’t know any Zulu songs, and Sometimes the legacy of discrimination is in the when she told the teacher this, the teacher told her not to be ashamed of her background. form of psychological damage, where a learner might genuinely begin to feel inferior to others. Own source A low self-image can lead to depression and anxiety. We are atheists, and were totally irritated by the school’s decision to make each group pray in their own group in the morning assembly. So Tauriq was Discrimination hurts 2 told to pray with the Muslims. He said to me, “Daddy, I want to pray with the other children”. In the school’s When the child with HIV tells other children that he attempts to be multicultural, they ended up dividing has HIV they don’t love him because they think they the children even more. will get that disease. And they start to hate him and beat him at school. The child will cry and say ‘I want Own source to die’ because people do not treat him the way they were treating him and his friends. University of Cape Town 2001 p. 19 (adapted) Discrimination Leaves a Lasting Imprint The impact of discrimination might be on the Discrimination has a negative influence on functionality of the school. Student alienation, individual learners and educators, and on conflict, violence or protests prevent normal the school as a community. This influence is teaching and learning from occurring. within the psychological, cultural and academic domains. Through its influence on individual Student alienation 2 students who graduate to become adults, parents and leaders in the community, discrimination at During a discussion with learners at the school, a complaint about racism emerged from a black school leaves a lasting imprint on the society as student, who said: “We have rugby, cricket, but no a whole. soccer! We have complained about this so many times to educators and the headmaster, but they The failure of principals or teachers to always make up some excuse”. He went on to say acknowledge that some might be suffering that that was one of the reasons why more blacks got into trouble at school: “some of my friends smoke and from real or even imagined slights, leads to drink and get into fights, but they say there’s nothing the withdrawal of individuals into a cocoon of else to do and the educators in the school don’t care silence, anger or despair. about them anyway. The educators are always telling us how there are more discipline problems amongst ‘Racism is a trap’ 2 the black students”. Department of Education 2002 p. 36 People have done things that hurt a lot. Sometimes someone doesn’t intentionally mean to hurt you or is not consciously giving the message. You might perceive something as being racist or sexist, that was Discrimination can impede the academic totally devoid of those connotations, but it hurts you performance of a learner, who might feel all the same. Many people, especially black people undermined in the class. with the issues of racism begin to internalize it. A person may then say, “Oh, I’m not going to confront her/him about it, because that is just the way they
  16. 16. Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools 10Teacher’s attitudes affect academic 2 Not all schools which have students fromperformance more than one racial background are racially “integrated” in the manner described in theI am a Venda speaking person. My second language various chapters of this book. It would alsois English. I had a very confusing background about be illogical to describe schools with studentsmy second language. At school, few pupils wereEnglish speaking including our teachers. The rest of one race group only as “racially integrated”.were Blacks who didn’t know English, like myself. However, all schools can teach learners how toAt first I was forced to learn English so that I could behave in a racially integrated society.communicate with others at school. Although I startedto like English, it was still difficult for me to speak it Racial integration further implies that:well because of my teacher’s attitude towards thosewho do not know and understand English well. MyEnglish teacher was an Indian. She was very cruel. • all human beings are seen as equal,For example, if she told you to read a paragraph and irrespective of class, colour, religion, genderyou pronounced a word the way she didn’t like or and other categories;wrongly, she would say to you, “My child, why are you • diversity in student and staff profile is seen asbothering yourself by coming here everyday?” a strength; Own source • differences are acknowledged, discussed - and celebrated where appropriate; • differing needs are catered for and the legacyDiscrimination affects the perpetrator, who of past discrimination is taken into account;might develop a false sense of superiority and • different needs are not catered for viaentitlement. Other negative influences on the separation of students into parallel structures;perpetrator are isolation, mistrust or fear. In • an active stance is adopted, in order to promotesum, racism does not hurt the individual learner mutual understanding and reconciliation; andor teacher alone. It impoverishes the culture of • all individuals, irrespective of colour, classthe school, the community and the country. or religion, are seen as participants in the process of promoting racial integration.Where do we go from here? All schools have areas in which to improve,It is important that as we plan to make our no matter how many steps they have takenschools more integrated, we understand what we to achieve racial integration. The followingmean by “racial integration” in schools. chapters provide some advice about how to achieve school integration. Chapter 3 providesDefining racial integration information about the policies which guide school integration.Racial integration implies that individuals fromall racial backgrounds enjoy the rights to access Questions for Reflectionand participation in all aspects of the managementand services of the institution. This participation Place your school along the spectrum: 2is reflected in the composition, outputs practicesand culture of the institution. It refers to the totally divided truly integratedextent to which schools have made a conscious very discriminatory totally inclusiveattempt to respond to the needs of historicallydisadvantaged groups and help learners form highly conflictual thoroughly harmoniousrelationships with others, irrespective of colouror creed.
  17. 17. 11 Reflection - The Reality of Our Schools • As an individual, do you practise direct or References indirect discrimination? Use the following set of questions to help you reflect: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) 2002. Have I, through inaction or direct Building Integrated Classrooms; An Educators’ victimisation, Workbook. Johannesburg. denied a learner or a parent an opportunity Department of Education (DoE) 2000 to participate or voice an opinion? Language in the Classroom; Towards a denied a learner or a parent access to Framework for Intervention. resources? denied a learner or a parent access to Hilton-Barber, B. and Berger, L. 2002. services? The Official Field Guide to the Cradle of denied a learner or a parent their right to Humankind. Cape Town: Struik. human dignity and self respect? Mpumalanga Department of Education. 2001. • What are the signs demonstrating how Report on Diversity in Educational Institutions. divided, discriminatory or conflictual, your school is? University of Cape Town (UCT). 2001. • How would you penetrate beneath the surface National Children’s Forum on HIV/AIDS. to determine if there is covert and subtle Workshop Report discrimination at your school? • What impact does overt or subtle South African Human Rights Commission. discrimination have on the school as a 1999. learning institution? Racism, ‘Racial Integration’ and Desegregation in South African Public Secondary Schools. Suggested Further Reading A full set of definitions of terms relating to discrimination are provided in: ELRU (1997) Shifting Paradigms; Using an Anti-bias Strategy to Challenge Oppression and Assist Transformation in the South African Context. Cape Town: Rustica Press
  18. 18. Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools 12 Signposts 4The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools
  19. 19. 13 Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools The Vision of a Non-racial The values highlighted are: United and Democratic • democracy; South Africa • social justice and equity; • equality; Since 1994, the Department of Education has laid • non-racism and non-sexism; a clear policy foundation to define the kind of • ubuntu (human dignity); education system envisioned in the Constitution • an open society; of the Republic of South Africa (1996) • accountability (responsibility); – a vision of a society “based on democratic • the rule of law; values, social justice and fundamental human • respect; and rights” (preamble). All the policies developed • reconciliation. by the Department of Education provide an understanding for school government and Use of the guidance provided by policy should management, about the responsibilities of thus be undergirded by an understanding of the schools to learners, educators and parents, with values and principles which inform these policies, regard to racial integration. This chapter covers and by the vision of our society that has been only the national policies, and principals would expressed in the Constitution. The spirit in which be advised to consult with provincial officials to this journey towards racially integrated schools get more specific guidance. should be undertaken, should be one of open debate and honesty, and an ability to reflect on There has been a tendency amongst some one’s own institution and one’s role therein. This principals and School Governing Bodies to spirit of self reflection leading to concrete action manage schools according to the letter of the is described in the White Paper on Education and law rather than according to the principle, and to Training (1995), which called for “An Action use loopholes where possible, in order to avoid Plan for Human Rights in Education”, beginning genuinely allowing racially integrated schools to with a “frank and searching self-examination, flourish. For example, schools have attempted within every department and institution of the to maintain racial exclusivity by using criteria education system, of its own practice, tested such as language proficiency in order to keep against the Constitution’s fundamental rights English or African language speaking students requirements”. This should lead to action plans out of schools. For these reasons, this chapter is in all institutions, “so that there is a purposeful, not merely about what policy dictates – it is also incremental improvement in human rights about the values and spirit guiding the policies practices throughout the system” (1995:45). and practices of the educational system. Access It was with concern for the lack of a genuinely shared set of norms, that Minister Asmal Policy guidelines provide indications of how the appointed the first working group to report on integrated school should be governed in terms the values which should be guiding the policies of access, respect for difference, employment of and practices of officials, principals and teachers. educators and the management of the curriculum. The final report, entitled Manifesto on Values, Guidance on how to administer the access policy Education and Democracy, was published in of a school is provided by the National Education 2001. This report highlights ten Constitutional Policy Act of 1996, which commits the state to: values, which guide both the practice and the spirit of governance and teaching at all schools.
  20. 20. Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools 14 “enabling the education system to contribute An Inclusive Approach to the full personal development of each student, and to the moral, social, cultural, The concept of racial integration is very closely political and economic development of the linked to that of “inclusive education”, which nation at large …” is defined in White Paper 6: Special Needs Education – Building an Inclusive EducationThe rights guaranteed by this Act to every citizen and Training System of 2002. This paper dealsare the following: with learners with “special needs”, which, in the past, were seen as learners with mild or severe• to be protected from unfair discrimination learning difficulties. The new approach implies within or by an education department or that some learners have needs which are different educational institution on any grounds to those of the majority, or different to those whatsoever; which the school has traditionally catered for in• to basic education and equal access to the past. These needs may pertain to biological educational institutions; needs such as being hard of hearing, or needing• to be instructed in a language of choice, where a wheelchair, or they may pertain to social needs reasonably practicable; arising out of poverty, such as lack of nutrition or• to enjoy freedom of conscience, religion, warm clothing. They may also pertain to issues thought, belief, opinion, expression and arising out of difference, for example, having association; a different home language from that of other• to establish education institutions based on learners at the school. In all instances, the policy a common language, culture or religion, requires that the school: as long as race is not used as a basis for discrimination; and • recognises and respects the difference among• to use the language and participate in the all learners and builds on similarities; cultural life of his or her choice within an • supports all learners and caters for a full range education system. of learning needs; • overcomes barriers that prevent it fromWhen devising an access policy for a school, meeting the full range of learning needs; andone should not merely focus on one right, for • increases the capacity of educators to copeexample, “to use the language and participate with all forms of learning needs.in the cultural life of his or her choice withinan education system”, while ignoring the largerissue; that the access policy of a school cannot Employment of Educatorsuse race as a basis for discrimination – neither The employment of educators plays a crucialovertly, nor covertly, for example, by using role in promoting racial integration in schools.language or fees as a cover for exclusion. In A diverse teaching corps facilitates thethis instance the spirit of protection from unfair contributions of a wide variety of cultures, and itdiscrimination or the right to the full personal encourages students from all racial backgroundsdevelopment of each student, must weigh more to see role models in the teaching body. Thisheavily than the right to “establish education position is amply supported by policy, forinstitutions based on a common language”. If example the Employment Equity Act of 1998,various rights are seen to collide in this manner, which prohibits unfair discrimination anda school or community should find creative promotes affirmative action in order to ensureways to resolve them, rather than to practise representativity of designated groups with regardexclusion. to race, gender and disability in the workplace. The Employment of Educators Act of 1998, further stipulates that the filling of any post on
  21. 21. 15 Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools any educator establishment shall be with due • develop empathy for more vulnerable regard to equality, equity and the principles of the members of the community; and Constitution. The ethical conduct of educators • appreciate working democratically. with regard to racial integration is governed by the South African Council for Educators Act The Revised National Curriculum Statement for of 2000. This act provides for the possibility Grades 0 – 9 of 2002 is based upon the principles of sanction against educators who practice of social and environmental justice, human rights misconduct, including that of discrimination or and inclusivity. Elaboration of the way that abuse. The Norms and Standards for Educators teaching the new curriculum can foster racial of 2000 sets clear parameters for how educators integration, is provided within the statements should promote racial integration in schools. for each learning area, most notably within Life Three of the seven roles of an educator deal Orientation, the Human and Social Sciences, directly with this: Language, Literacy and Communication, and Arts and Culture. • as a learning mediator, the educator is called upon to mediate learning in a manner that Guidance on the use of language as medium is sensitive to diverse needs of learners, and as academic subjects is provided by the show respect for differences of others Language in Education Policy of 1997, which and appropriately contextualise learning requires that all schools should: materials; • as a leader, administrator and manager, • pursue the language policy most supportive of an educator is called upon to work in a general conceptual growth amongst learners; democratic fashion; and • as part of the educator’s citizenship and • counter disadvantages resulting from pastoral role, an educator is expected different kinds of mismatches between home to uphold the Constitution and promote languages and languages of learning and democratic values and practices in school and teaching. in the wider society. The implications of this policy are that schools Curriculum might need to employ educators who can teach the languages understood by a significant The direction for teaching within integrated number of students at the school; encourage schools, and for successful living in an monolingual or bilingual educators to learn the integrated society, has been provided by all languages understood by significant numbers curriculum documents, beginning with the of students at the school; or provide additional South African Qualifications Authority Act of languages as subjects, in order to consolidate the 1995, which specified the critical outcomes that academic language use of significant numbers must be considered when designing learning of students. The language issue remains tricky, programmes. One of the critical outcomes is: to as it requires balancing matters of human “work effectively with others in a team, group, resource deployment, competency, emotion and organisation and community.” This implies that perceptions of status. the learner will: • develop civic mindedness; • develop tolerance for difference (racial, religious, cultural, gender) within the group; • appreciate the importance of making a positive contribution to the group and society;
  22. 22. Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools 16Questions for FurtherReflection• When discussing these policies, what is the vision for your school, and how does this influence the way you understand the policies, with regard to racial integration?• How recently have you revised the school vision and mission? Is this still appropriate in relation to the Constitution and to the needs of the new South Africa?• Which of the policies referred to in this chapter are available for educators and parents to consult in your school?• If these are not available, how will you obtain them and make them available to others?ReferencesConstitution of the Republic of South Africa1996.Employment Equity Act 1998.Employment of Educators Act 1998.Language in Education Policy 1997.Manifesto on Values, Education and Democracy2001.National Education Policy Act 1996.Norms and Standards for Educators 2000.Revised National Curriculum Statement forGrades 0 – 9 2002.South African Council for Educators Act 2000.South African Qualifications Authority Act1995.White Paper 6: Special Needs Education– Building an Inclusive Education and TrainingSystem 2002.White Paper on Education and Training 1995.
  23. 23. 17 Signposts - The Policies Guiding Integration in Schools
  24. 24. Portrait of an Integrated School 18 5 Portrait of anIntegrated School
  25. 25. 19 Portrait of an Integrated School What a Casual Visitor Would song which begins:The Settlers came in days gone by to this our land so dear,To live and die that you See and I might work and prosper here.The matric class of 2002, inspired by the efforts of some parents to If, as a casual visitor, one visited a school, how raise awareness of their Khoekhoe heritage, and especially by the return to South Africa of the remains would one know that the school is integrated? of Sarah Bartmann, decided to donate to the school Here are some concrete signs the casual visitor a ceramic mural depicting a herder encampment might look out for: at the Cape in the late seventeenth century. The people who were living in the vicinity at the time were Amongst the learners the Cochoqua. The mural was placed on the wall of a school building alongside a courtyard that was re-named the Cochoqua Court at a ceremony on 25 Learners are not taught in streams dominated September 2002. by racial, ethnic or religious classifications. Deacon, J, 2002:122 Learners are not segregated according to colour or language use at assembly. Learners of different backgrounds interact freely during break. They Language would socialize together after school. The school might have devised a programme to encourage The school acknowledges in announcements learners to get to know each other and to mix and notices the main languages used by learners. more freely after hours. The school does not prohibit students from speaking their home languages during breaks Learners appear confident about their appearance, or during sessions where learners are working language and identity. together. Learners are encouraged to learn African languages, if they are speakers of other Images on display languages. African language speaking students are provided with the opportunity to learn their Decorations, displays, the school name and home languages as first languages. Learners motto, reflect the diversity of values and for whom the main language used at the school aspirations of all learners. is not their first language, would be provided with additional support, if this was needed, Being South African without being separated out of the academic mainstream. There is evidence of the school’s pride in the local community as well as in being a part of Educators and learners have made an effort to South Africa. The national flag is displayed pronounce names of learners from different and the learners know and understand all verses language groups accurately. of the national anthem. The school celebrates important national days, for example Freedom School profile Day, in addition to the important religious and cultural days observed by learners at the school. The teaching profile in racially mixed schools, reflects the profile of students at the school. In homogenous schools, there might be a diversity What does it mean to be a 2 of educators in order for learners to experience South African school? something of other cultures. African teachers The Settlers High School voluntarily ceased to be a are not employed solely to teach indigenous whites-only school in 1990 to overcome the hurdle languages. of racial prejudice. The majority of its learners today are from the group previously classified as Coloured, despite the now inappropriate words of the school
  26. 26. Portrait of an Integrated School 20Diversity benefits all 2 devised ways to make learners aware of the discriminatory nature of the materials it uses,Port Elizabeth – The first day that the three white until new materials can be acquired.girls made their appearance in a black school in theinformal settlement of KwaNoxolo near Bloemendal,all the other children gathered around them. But three Food and entertainmentdays later, all the children played and learnt togetherlike old mates.According to their father, “The main Food in the feeding scheme, for school eventsreason for my decision to send my daughters to the and in the tuck shop, reflects the diversity ofschool was because they would learn more English, religious and cultural approaches of all theand Xhosa will help them in their future”.Their fatherwas satisfied with the standard of the primary school learners. Kosher, halaal or African traditionalonce he checked their homework. He was very food is provided. End of term excursions andexcited when one of his daughters came to ask him other entertainment events reflect the aspirationsone day what a Xhosa word meant. of all the students. If students have radically Beeld 14 June 2003 (translated from Afrikaans) different interests, the school uses a combination of dialogue and compromise to encourage the learners to share in an inclusive entertainmentLeadership and management programme. Music played at school dances is negotiated so that all learners participate andThe management team, school governing body are willing to compromise. The school does notand learner representative council reflect the encourage outings for which only some learnersdiversity of the school profile, in terms of race, can pay, and others are left behind.language, social class and gender. Dialogue withparents is welcome and meetings with parents Sports, arts and cultureand elections of School Governing Bodies takeplace at times which are designed to occur when The school offers sporting codes that cater forparents are available. the interests of all learners. There is a mix of students in the school choir, and a broad range ofCurriculum genres are used in variety concerts. There is no crude stereotyping, where it is predictable thatEducators make use of the opportunities African learners will be doing a gumboot dance,provided in the new curriculum statements and Indian learners wearing saries and white learnersthe curriculum renewal process, to promote doing the sakkie sakkie. The school participatesknowledge and consciousness of social justice in sporting and cultural events organized by theand equity amongst learners. All learners, circuit, district or local community structures.irrespective of language background, gender orcolour, are encouraged to take gateway subjects Dealing with special needssuch as mathematics and science. There is not alarge gap between the achievement levels of the The school has made provision for the specialstudents. If there is a large gap, due to previous needs of its learners, educators and parents. Foreducational background, the school has devised example, it has ramps for wheelchairs - and ifan academic support strategy to try and narrow not, it has devised alternative ways for studentsthe gap in performance. to help each other navigate steps and other difficult corners.Support materials Religious observanceThe school uses learning and teaching supportmaterials which promote a respect for diversity. The school does not privilege the religiousIf the school cannot afford new materials, it has observance of a particular group of students at the school. While students are encouraged
  27. 27. 21 Portrait of an Integrated School to share information and insights about their The Ethos of an Integrated religions and cultures, religious differences are not used to keep students apart from each other. School Students with specific religious requirements, for A casual observer may be able to gauge the level example, to wear a scarf or scull cap/yarmelka, of integration at a school by observing some of are allowed to do so. the above phenomena. These are signs of an underlying culture of respect and harmony at The school makes provision for specific the school. It is useful to paint the picture of this religious observances requiring students to underlying school culture as well. observe outside school events, such as funerals or mosque attendance on a Friday. The school is functional Discipline The school is confident about the ability of the institution to maintain a culture of quality There is no evidence that one gender, racial or teaching and learning. There is a culture of social group is constantly being disciplined more respect for learners and educators at school. than another. Problems relating to discipline Learners all feel acknowledged and respected, affecting one group only have been investigated, as do the teachers. Firm disciplinary boundaries and solutions found through dialogue and reduce the need for defensiveness and fear. Good leadership. administration and clear focus on the purpose of education, i.e. teaching and learning, facilitate the ‘us’ and ‘them’ development of tools for negotiation, developing respect and tolerance, and negotiating difficult Conversations of educators or learners are not situations. Educators feel sufficiently valued constantly peppered with references to ‘us’ to be prepared to take on new challenges, and ‘them’, ‘Abelungu’ or ‘we Africans’, as experiment with teaching techniques or provide if learners and educators have not begun to extra support to learners. Learners are aware of understand and appreciate each other as being the goals to which they aspire, and feel supported part of the same community. to work towards these goals. A culture of safety and pride encourages learners and educators to Incidents take risks, and to believe that their initiative will be appreciated, their mistakes forgiven. When discriminatory incidents do occur, these are dealt with swiftly and in an appropriate Integration leads to Improvement 2 manner. The learners have been taught skills in standards of conflict resolution, and appropriate responses to complex situations have been discussed by I would lay my head on a block that in this school, if educators in the staffroom or staff development anything, our standards have gone up. But I wouldn’t workshops. Consultation with the provincial say that they’ve gone up necessarily because of officials or members of the community has integration. They’ve gone up because, as a teaching occurred. force in this school, as a result of integration, we’ve had to sit down and think harder than we had to think before. Arising out of that hard thinking has been far Support better approaches to teaching. So you know, in an indirect way I would say that integration itself has led When dealing with the sometimes difficult to an improvement in standards. issues of negotiating difference or dealing with Naidoo, J. 1996 p. 73 discrimination, learners and educators know to whom they can turn if they need counselling or support.
  28. 28. Portrait of an Integrated School 22The school has embraced change have been called into question, and reshaped, taking into account the national motto, “!KEThe school is enthusiastic about working towards E: /XARRA //KE -Unity in Diversity”. Thea new, inclusive culture. school culture is firmly rooted within the local community, proud of its relationship to the restAdvantages in Working for Change 2 of South Africa, and contributing to the African renewal.Advantages of consciously educating in ways thatbreak down divisions of the past and encourage How does one get a school to measure up toinclusion and unity are that:• everyone in the school and classroom is aware that this idealistic portrait? The suggestions for the challenges need to be overcome; strategy for institutional change are contained• everyone understands and feels comfortable with in Chapter 5, ‘Taking the School on a Journey’. the value of integration; Chapter 6, ‘Towards a Common Future’,• the school is a vibrant community where open provides suggestions on how teachers can equip dialogue and constructive expressions of unique perceptions and experiences are encouraged; and students to deal with integration.• all learners are reaching their full and unique potential. Questions for reflection Centre for the Study on Violence and Reconciliation 2002 p. 39 • How does my school measure up to this idealistic portrait of an integrated school?Since change towards a more inclusive and open • Which elements are not evident in myculture involves risk taking and moments of school?discomfort at the interpersonal and institutional • What are the reasons for the absence of theselevel, it has developed a support system for its elements?educators and learners. • Which elements of this portrait present a priority area for change at my school?Integration enriches lives 2I would just like to say that one of the things that Referencesapartheid did was it separated us, and it made usbelieve that we could never live together, that we Centre for the Study of Violence andwere really different. So I think it is a good thing that Reconciliation (CSVR) 2002.our schools are integrated so that we can realize that Building Integrated Classrooms: An Educator’swe have so much more in common than we have that Workbook. Johannesburg.is different and we can learn to enrich each other’slives. There are things that you can teach me thatwill enrich my life and I think there are things I can Deacon, J. 2002. Heritage and African History.teach you that will enrich your life … if only we can Discussion paper for Conference on History,overcome that barrier. Memory and Human Progress organised by the South African History Project. Centre for the Study on Violence and Reconciliation 2002 p.41 Du Toit, F. 2003 Learning to Live Together; Practices ofAn integrated school has a new culture Social Reconciliation. Institute for Justice and Reconciliation (IJR) Cape Town.An integrated school is not a school thatsuppresses the culture and practices of the Naidoo, J. 1996.minority learners. It does not look like a ‘fruit Racial Integration of Public High Schools insalad’ or an accumulation of the sum total of the South Africa; A Study of Practices, Attitudesdifferent identities. Rather, it is a new, optimistic and Trends. EPU Research Paper. University ofand rejuvenated institution. All identities Natal, Durban.
  29. 29. 23 Portrait of an Integrated School
  30. 30. Taking the Whole School on a Journey - Strategies for Transformation 24 Taking the Whole 6School on a Journey Strategies for Transformation
  31. 31. 25 Taking the Whole School on a Journey - Strategies for Transformation A successfully integrated school is one which We do not consider our school to be a perfect has consciously embarked on a strategy for example of racial integration, but it does show our willingness to change and become constructively integration, rather than a school which hopes involved. A principal like myself tends to become to put out fires if - and when - they occur. This aware of and handle serious problems and be chapter does not provide a blueprint for a strategy unaware of less serious incidents, which underlines for integrating schools. As the principal quoted the importance of a school-wide culture of self- in the box below states, there is no one recipe for evaluation and communal responsibility.I still believe that most schools require help from the Education success. All contexts are different, with differing Department to deal with issues of racial integration. needs and learner profiles. The chapter describes We also require help from the Department to protect a menu of the nine steps a school might follow as us from opportunist political interventions during crisis part of the change process: situations, and a sustainable model for successful school-level intervention. We need a clear vision of what a successfully integrated school is, and the • acknowledge the need for action; proactive training of school principals, management • call in a facilitator; teams and governing bodies. We need training • assess the problem; programmes aimed at altering entrenched attitudes • get the views of all stakeholders; held by many educators in our communities. • set up a group to work on a draft strategy; Adapted from DoE 1999 p.5/6 • develop a strategy; • get support for the strategy; • set up a group for implementation and monitoring; Acknowledge the Need for • review the progress of the strategy; and Action • celebrate your achievements. A strategy tends to be successful when all those Building upon difference 2 involved believe it is necessary All schools require a strategy on promoting inclusivity. All One incident at our school involved 8% of learners of schools are diverse in one sense or another: there colour in 1995. The protest was about one student, are schools with students from different linguistic and made front page of the London Times. Since this time we embarked on a thorough process and ethnic backgrounds, schools with learners of transformation:First of all there was no single, from mixed income groups, schools with girls ready-made way of dealing with the problem that we and boys. Even if the school does not believe could simply copy and adapt – to us this means that its learner population is mixed, it is still part of national or provincial policies cannot be imposed top the duty of the school is to prepare its learners to down, in an inflexible manner.We set up structures at school to encourage continuous dialogue and self- participate in and contribute to the development evaluation at all levels in the school. We involved of an integrated and harmonious South Africa. all stakeholder groups. This critical self-evaluation and willingness to change and entertain new ideas became institutionalized, and continues to be a Call in a Facilitator feature of the ethos of the institution.We identified common goals through a process of consultation, If the leadership at a school feels they do not so that learners and staff felt they had a common have the expertise - or groups are too polarised purpose. All aspects of the school had to be reviewed - to develop the strategy, they might call in a and new policies were developed on a continuous basis to ensure that the school was serving the facilitator. The facilitator could be drawn from interests of its community. During this process we the district, a consultancy or a non-governmental realized that recognizing and building upon individual organisation (NGO). A list of resource agencies differences was far more beneficial and effective than is provided in Chapter 8. The school should ignoring these. We also felt that integration could not involve the Provincial Department of Education be forced upon the members of various groups, since individuals were entitled to choose to associate with in this process. whomsoever they wished.

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