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Cracking the Code: How To Think About QR
 

Cracking the Code: How To Think About QR

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  • Cracking the Code: How to Think About QRSince 1994, these strange symbols found on products and printed materials have made their way around the globe. From Japan to Europe they’ve presented a way to bridge real-space and the digital-space – primarily using the cameras on our smart phones. Learn how they’ve infiltrated North America, too – why your clients are asking for them, how brands are using them, and what to consider when exploring QR or proprietary 2D codes as a tactic. Presented by: Molly Garris and Jake Setlak
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdA__2tKoIUClip from “A Christmas Story” (1983) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085334
  • Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QR_Codehttp://www.denso-wave.com/qrcode/index-e.html
  • Sources: http://www.denso-wave.com/qrcode/index-e.html
  • Source: http://www.denso-wave.com/qrcode/index-e.html“By carrying information in both directions (vertical + horizontal = two-dimensional barcode), QR codes can carry up to several hundred times the amount of data carried by an ordinary barcodes.” – Denso-Wave
  • NOTE: * Most devices require additional third-party software or app to decipher QR Codes. For users who do not already have these apps installed, an additional step of installing the appropriate app is required before participating in a QR program.Source: http://www.retinafunk.com/weblog/?p=51
  • NOTE: “http:” instructions can retrieve anything with a unique URL: Web or WAP site, YouTube video link, Facebook profile, audio, video, or graphic (coupon) file download, etc.Source: http://www.qrme.co.uk/qr-codes-explained.html
  • Sources: http://www.intomobile.com/2008/03/18/qr-codes-to-take-off-in-the-usa-due-to-rapid-airline-boarding
  • Sources:http://www.google.com/help/maps/favoriteplaces/business/index.htmlPhoto by hanapbuhay http://www.flickriver.com/photos/hanapbuhay/4251438561
  • Sources:http://kottke.org/08/06/tombstone-barcodeshttp://blog.foreignpolicy.com/files/images/080610_Ishinokoe3.jpg
  • Sources:http://kottke.org/08/06/tombstone-barcodeshttp://blog.foreignpolicy.com/files/images/080610_Ishinokoe3.jpg
  • Coke Zero - Event Marketing Program (February – October 2010)• 5 different SnapTag promotions enable Street Teamsto engage consumers at over 900 events• Consumers are invited to join the Coke Zero mobile club• SnapTag coding gives the marketer visibility tochannel and media performance• A web dashboard allows event teams to updateSnapTag responses & monitor live results• Responses indicate if program is live in market today
  • Quoted from “mediadude” on Twitter: http://twitter.com/mediadude/status/1059525414Source: “2D Barcodes: Why There’s No Urgency” by Julie A. Ask, Forrester Research, 21 September 2010Many Android devices and some BlackBerry models are able to read QR Codes as a native function (not requiring additional applications) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QR_Code#Standalone_ApplicationsNo one is really sure when.
  • NOTE: QR Code shown will display:
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near_Field_CommunicationNear Field Communication or NFC, is a short-range high-frequency wireless communication technology which enables the exchange of data between devices over about a 10 centimeter (around4 inches) distance.Additional Reading on NFC:http://www.nfc-forum.org/homehttp://www.nearfield.org/abouthttp://mashable.com/2010/05/06/near-field-communicationhttp://www.macrumors.com/2010/08/15/apple-hires-near-field-communications-experthttp://www.abiresearch.com/research/1003525-Near+Field+Communications+%28NFC%29http://www.softwareindustryinsights.com/2010/04/near-field-communication-and-travelhttp://www.geekery.co.za/pokens-its-ok-to-be-useless-if-youre-cute
  • Encouraging brands to digitize their content and experiment with QR, RFID, etc. is building a foundation on which more user-friendly technologies like NFC can emerge and grow more mainstream.
  • Thank you.

Cracking the Code: How To Think About QR Cracking the Code: How To Think About QR Presentation Transcript

  • Cracking The Code: How To Think About QR
    26 October 2010
  • What we’ll cover:
    Origins & Early Adoption
    Evolution of Proprietary Codes
    Considerations & Recommendations
    What’s Next?
  • Origins & Early Adoption
  • What are Quick Response Codes?
    A QR Code is a two-dimensional barcode, readable by QR scanners or QR scanning apps available on Smartphones. The information encoded can be text, a URL or other data. QR Codes are one of the most popular types of two-dimensional barcodes.
    Sources: Wikipedia, Denso-Wave Corporation
  • Origins of QR Codes
    Created by Japanese corporation Denso-Wave in 1994, the QR codes were first implemented as an order/product scanning system for automotive parts.
    Benefits:
    • Gather large volumes of shipping data by one-touch operation.
    • Significantly reduce the cost of forms compared with conventional slips.
    Source: Denso-Wave Corporation
  • How do they work?
    QR Code
    Bar Code
    Contains data
    Contains no data
    Contains data
    Contains data
    Source: Denso-Wave Corporation
  • How do they work?
    Application* decodes data
    Data instructs device to perform a task
    Scans (takes pic) of code on mobile device
    User encounters QR Code
    Source: Graphic adapted from a Retina Funk blog post
  • What exactly is encoded?
    Source: “QR Codes Explained”, QRme.co.uk
  • Early Adoption of QR Codes
    (Insert “bowl of cherries” joke here.)
    10
  • Adoption of QR Codes grew first in Asia, then Europe, driven by quick-response programs created for consumer mobile devices without the benefit of a full QWERTY keypad.
    11
  • The QR code serves as a shortcut to typing a full URL or phone number. In this example, the code delivered a movie trailer and local show times to London commuters waiting for tube trains.
    12
  • It’s common for QR Codes to deliver richer marketing or product information, but some instead encode customer information. For example, Continental (pictured) and other airlines continue to experiment with QR Codes to expedite the on-boarding process.
  • Calvin Klein recently tested QR Codes when the company replaced several “racy” outdoor ads with this giant code – to help distribute an uncensored version of the advertising.
    14
  • Adoption of QR Codes
    To celebrate Internet Week 2010, the City of New York outfitted Times Square with a rotation of several large ads featuring QR Codes.
    Inclusion of the codes catered to both the tech-savvy crowd visiting for Internet Week and the press who had more reason to talk about these ads because of the QR.
    15
  • QR Codes work best as one component of a larger program.
    Nike’s True City program uses QR in conjunction with a mobile app, print, outdoor, and an evolving network of content curators to help fans learn more about select European cities, their culture, and, of course, where you can buy a new pair of Nikes.
    16
  • Google uses QR Codes to bridge online and offline worlds.The Favorite Place program helps businesses leverage the extended Google universe (Maps, Ratings, etc), but also many Android devices that can now read QR without any additional apps.
  • Others strive to connect this life with the next…
    In Japan, “machine-readable tombstones” use QR to let visitors view images of the deceased, browse the guestbook, even make an entry using a cell phone.
  • Best Buyconnects shoppers with relevant information to inform their purchase decision.
    In stores, QR codes link to product reviews, images and other information from the Best Buy mobile site. On circulars, QR codes link shoppers to full product inventory and related product accessories.
  • Evolution of Proprietary Codes
  • What are Proprietary Codes?
    A Proprietary Code is another type of two-dimensional barcode. They are experiencing strong growth in the US but do not have the global reach of non-proprietary two-dimensional codes (e.g. QR codes).
    They can reveal text, a URL or other data, though a Proprietary Code’s data is stored on a cloud-based server, not within the code.
    Another distinction is that these codes are not scannable by a universal two-dimensional barcode reader. They either require their own proprietary reader or in some cases, can only be encoded via MMS or email.
  • Why are brands adopting them in the US?
    • Some proprietary codes can extend reach to feature phones
    • Branding ability
    • Free or low cost to experiment
    • Follow-the-leader
  • Challenges with Proprietary Codes
    Communicating how to access content
    • Selecting the correct scanning app
    • E-Mail
    • MMS (for certain carriers)
    • Ongoing alerts come from a long code
    Feature phones – are they worth it?
    • Feature phone users are not acclimated to using mobile content
    • Cannot access data, so can really only engage via SMS
  • Non-Proprietary
    QR code
    EZ code
    Easier to Use
    More Difficult to Use
    Microsoft Tag
    Jag Tag
    Snap Tag
    Proprietary
  • Non-Proprietary
    Decodes instantly / Requires Internet
    QR code
    EZ code
    Easier to Use
    More Difficult to Use
    Decodes in the cloud / Does not require Internet
    Microsoft Tag
    Jag Tag
    Snap Tag
    Proprietary
  • Considerations & Recommendations
  • We don’t really need QR & 2D codes.
    • They are too often “a solution looking for a problem” 1
    • Only 1% of US mobile phone owners have used a 2D bar code scanner in the past three months2 (Forrester)
    • More of our devices will be equipped to read them without additional software3, yet there is no standard format
    • The expectation that the technology will eventually4 hit mainstream prompts marketers to keep experimenting…
    Why?
    Quoted from “mediadude” on Twitter: http://twitter.com/mediadude/status/1059525414
    Source: “2D Barcodes: Why There’s No Urgency” by Julie A. Ask, Forrester Research, 21 September 2010
    Many Android devices and some BlackBerry models are able to read QR Codes as a native function (not requiring additional applications) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QR_Code#Standalone_Applications
    No one is really sure when.
  • Criteria for Determining Use of QR Codes
    Be honest: are we simplifying or complicating a user experience? If we’re complicating, why?
    Is the intended audience likely to require education on how to use QR?
    What is the overall experience? Does QR compete with or compliment another call-to-action?
    Is the context right? Are the codes in places where they’ll be noticed? Is there adequate cell reception?
    Is it an integrated part of a larger, coordinated effort – rather than an add-on?
    Is the encoded content compelling, worth the effort of retrieving it?
    If the intention is solely to gain “cool points”, why? Are everyone’s expectations set accordingly?
    No crummy commercials.
  • How could marketers use QR?
    • To increase convenience / access for existing and potential customers
    • Create a “shortcut” to deep-linked online content
    • For brand awareness / “cool points”
    • As a lead generation mechanism
    • To deliver “digital souvenirs” / exclusive, compelling branded content
    • To capture valuable feedback, and measure traditional media responses
  • What’s Next?
  • AR + QR + RFID + (XYZ) = Near-Field Communication
  • Electronic ticketing for airlines, events and public transit
    Mobile payments, couponing and m-commerce
    Smart posters, objects and packaging
    NFC
    Print from your camera by holding it close to the printer
    Simplified pairing of wireless devices
    Share business cards with a touch
    Electronic keys for cars, hotel rooms, home or office
    Identity documents
  • Thank you.