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Industrial Robots

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Industrial robots play an increasing role in modern production and assembly facilities. The different types of robot available and their configuration are discussed. Examples of typical uses in …

Industrial robots play an increasing role in modern production and assembly facilities. The different types of robot available and their configuration are discussed. Examples of typical uses in sectors of the engineering industry are also identified.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

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  • @prabhuramselvan Dear mr, my name is mark nabil i am making my bachelor project an industrial robot , and i was asking for your help on making a teaching capability for my robot how can i do that with ordinary microcontroller or data acquisition , and thanks alot .
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  • very nice
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  • We at ABB, are giving away RobotStudio - Industrial Robot simulation software free for 1 year.

    Know more at http://facebook.com/robotstudio

    Lets join hands to build a better world with automation & increased productivity,

    /Build the tomorrow./
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  • 1. Industrial Robots Design for Manufacture HNC in Engineering Year 1 Author: Leicester College Date created: Date revised: 2009 Abstract Industrial robots play an increasing role in modern production and assembly facilities. The different types of robot available and their configuration are discussed. Examples of typical uses in sectors of the engineering industry are also identified. For further information regarding unit outcomes go to Edexcel.org.uk/ HN/ Engineering / Specifications These files support the Edexcel HN unit – Design for Manufacture (NQF L4) © Leicester College 2009. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License . File name Unit outcome Key words Design for assembly 1.1, 1.2,1.4 Overview, Cost, quality, reliability, assembly, guidelines FMS 2.2 Models, work cycles, volume, machine utilisation, automation, flexible, systems Geometric Tolerancing 3.1,3.2 Geometric, tolerance, system, symbols, orientation, BS, ISO, location, runout, datum Industrial Robots 2.2,2.3 Robot, industrial, robot arm, Cartesian, polar, cylindrical, jointed arm Jigs and Fixtures 2.1,2.3 Efficiency, production, jigs, fixtures, tooling, production, Kinematics 2.1,2.3 Machines, kinematics, Degrees of freedom, configuration, space, work space, robot, joints, forward, inverse DFM introduction 1.1, 1.2, 1.4 design
  • 2. What is an Industrial Robot?
    • A programmable, multi-function manipulator designed to automate tasks such as welding or the movement of materials through variable programmed motions.
    • Are capable of performing a wide variety of tasks and are an integral part of automated manufacturing systems.
    Industrial Robots
  • 3. What is an Industrial Robot?
    • It consists of a number of rigid links connected by joints and controlled by a computer.
    • The link assembly, or robot arm, is connected to a body that is mounted onto a base.
    • A wrist attached to the robot arm uses an end effector to facilitate gripping or handling.
    • The complete motion of the end effector is accomplished through a series of motions and positions of the links, joints, and wrist.
    Industrial Robots
  • 4. Types of Industrial Robots Industrial Robots
  • 5. Cartesian
    • These are also called a rectilinear or gantry robots. The links are connected by linear joints.
    Industrial Robots
  • 6. Cylindrical
    • The robot has one rotary joint at the base and linear joints to connect the links. They have a cylindrical-shaped work envelope.
    Industrial Robots
  • 7. Polar
    • The arm is connected to the base with a twisting joint and a combination of rotary and linear joints. They have a spherical-shaped work envelope.
    © Peter17 found at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Robot_ABB_4.jpg . This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution  ShareAlike  3.0  License. Industrial Robots
  • 8. Jointed arm
    • This is a combination of the cylindrical and articulated configurations. The arm is connected to the base with a twisting joint. The links in the arm are connected by rotary joints.
    © Gastev - found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/gastev/2174505811/ . This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Industrial Robots
  • 9. Industrial Robots Design for Manufacture Year 1
  • 10. This resource was created Leicester College and released as an open educational resource through the Open Engineering Resources project of the Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre. The Open Engineering Resources project was funded by HEFCE and part of the JISC/HE Academy UKOER programme. © 2009 Leicester College This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License. The JISC logo is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Licence. All reproductions must comply with the terms of that licence. The HEA logo is owned by the Higher Education Academy Limited may be freely distributed and copied for educational purposes only, provided that appropriate acknowledgement is given to the Higher Education Academy as the copyright holder and original publisher. The Leicester College name and logo is owned by the College and should not be produced without the express permission of the College.