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The Upper Works
A Thomas Cole pencil sketch, dated September 23, 1846, is the only known image showing the village of Adirondac as it look...
Benson J. Lossing’s 1859 rendering of the “Deserted Village,” made shortly after the village was abandoned. At center is t...
Theodore R. Davis’s 1868 sketch of the “Deserted Village,” from  Harper’s Weekly.
Seneca Ray Stoddard’s 1873 sketch of what he called “the ruined village,” from his  Adirondacks Illustrated.
One of two 1886 photos by Edward Bierstadt of the Adirondack Club clubhouse (center) and the MacNaughton Cottage (right).
A second 1886 Edward Bierstadt photo, from a color postcard, showing the Adirondack Club’s barns (foreground), the clubhou...
A third 1886 photo, on the back labeled “Adirondack Club(!) House, Village of Adirondac, George B. Wood.” (Adirondack Muse...
An 1888 photo by Seneca Ray Stoddard shows the clubhouse annex (left) and an unidentified two-story cottage (possibly a re...
An 1890 photo by an unidentified photographer shows the Adirondack Club, with the first new Club cottage standing at the n...
This panoramic photo, taken around 1900, features: the MacNaughton Cottage (center); the Debevoise Cottage (right) built i...
Another panoramic photo, taken in 1905, show Mrs. Arthur Masten (left) and her daughter, the mother of Arthur Crocker. On ...
This 1964 photo, taken shortly after National Lead closed down the village as a live settlement for the last time, shows h...
A look up Adirondac’s Main Street, featuring the MacNaughton Cottage, as it looked to Jet Lowe in 1978.  (HAER)
Adirondac’s Main Street as it looked on the photo on the front cover of Roger Trancik’s 1985  Hamlets of the Adirondacks, ...
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Graphic supplement for "Tales from the Deserted Village" (Part 3 of 3)

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A collection of archival photos, drawings and engravings of the iron-mining settlement known as McIntyre, Adirondac or the Upper Works which later became the site of the old Tahawus Club colony.

Published in: Art & Photos, Education
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Transcript of "Graphic supplement for "Tales from the Deserted Village" (Part 3 of 3)"

  1. 1. The Upper Works
  2. 2. A Thomas Cole pencil sketch, dated September 23, 1846, is the only known image showing the village of Adirondac as it looked when it was still an active iron plantation. On the north end of the village is the 1846 blast furnace.
  3. 3. Benson J. Lossing’s 1859 rendering of the “Deserted Village,” made shortly after the village was abandoned. At center is the schoolhouse, with cupola; up the street is the boarding house, across from the MacNaughton Cottage.
  4. 4. Theodore R. Davis’s 1868 sketch of the “Deserted Village,” from Harper’s Weekly.
  5. 5. Seneca Ray Stoddard’s 1873 sketch of what he called “the ruined village,” from his Adirondacks Illustrated.
  6. 6. One of two 1886 photos by Edward Bierstadt of the Adirondack Club clubhouse (center) and the MacNaughton Cottage (right).
  7. 7. A second 1886 Edward Bierstadt photo, from a color postcard, showing the Adirondack Club’s barns (foreground), the clubhouse annex just beyond the clubhouse itself, the ruins of several iron-works era structures, and the sawmill and schoolhouse (far right)
  8. 8. A third 1886 photo, on the back labeled “Adirondack Club(!) House, Village of Adirondac, George B. Wood.” (Adirondack Museum P020888)
  9. 9. An 1888 photo by Seneca Ray Stoddard shows the clubhouse annex (left) and an unidentified two-story cottage (possibly a remnant of the iron-works era) across from the MacNaughton Cottage.
  10. 10. An 1890 photo by an unidentified photographer shows the Adirondack Club, with the first new Club cottage standing at the north end of the village. The large, two-story cottage, built in the 1880s by Alexander Taylor, was later known as the Terry Cottage for its last owner, John T. Terry Jr. (Adirondack Museum P037393)
  11. 11. This panoramic photo, taken around 1900, features: the MacNaughton Cottage (center); the Debevoise Cottage (right) built in 1900 by George L. Nichols; immediately north MacNaughton, the Lockwood Cottage, built in 1899 by George Abbott; next, Mrs. Taylor’s Cottage or Lazy Lodge, built by William F. King in the 1890s; and, on the far left (across the street) can be seen the two-story front porch of the clubhouse annex.
  12. 12. Another panoramic photo, taken in 1905, show Mrs. Arthur Masten (left) and her daughter, the mother of Arthur Crocker. On the left is the clubhouse annex; on the right is the Abbott/Lockwood Cottage. (Adirondack Museum P061013)
  13. 13. This 1964 photo, taken shortly after National Lead closed down the village as a live settlement for the last time, shows historian Harold Hochschild and a Mr. Hall in front of the MacNaughton Cottage. (Adirondack Museum P024286)
  14. 14. A look up Adirondac’s Main Street, featuring the MacNaughton Cottage, as it looked to Jet Lowe in 1978. (HAER)
  15. 15. Adirondac’s Main Street as it looked on the photo on the front cover of Roger Trancik’s 1985 Hamlets of the Adirondacks, Development Strategies.
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