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LBGF Coaching development program manual

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LBGF Coach Development Program - Training the coaches to coach!

LBGF Coach Development Program - Training the coaches to coach!

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  • 1. LBGF COACH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Table of Contents 1. Introduction to LBGF 2. LBGF Coaching Philosophy 3. Long Term Athlete Development 4. “The Steps” 5. Life Skills through Golf a) Integrity b) Self-Respect c) Courtesy d) Sportsmanship e) Confidence f) Perseverance g) Patience h) Social Integration 6. LBGF Coaches Code of Conduct 7. LBGF Coaching Model a) The Coaching Phases b) Cyclone Zone c) Smash Zone 8. Health and Safety 9. Individual Needs of Children 10. Player Centred Skill Development 11. Effective Coaching a) An Effective Coach b) How Children Learn c) Understanding Developing Skills d) Coaches Role in using Games to Teach Skills e) Communicating Effectively 12. Session Plans a) Understanding the Session Plan b) Executing the Session Plan c) Session Rules and Requirements 13. LBGF Policies and Reporting a) Attendance Registers b) Session Plans & Evaluations c) Weekly Reporting to Head Office d) Monthly Reporting to Head Office e) Equipment and Asset Reconciliation Reports 14. LBGF Coaching Development Program 15. LBGF Coaching Structure 16. Being a LBGF Coach
  • 2. 1. Introduction to LBGF The Lee Bromley Golf Foundation (LBGF) is a “Grass Roots” initiative and “First Touch” program that introduces golf to disadvantaged children from deprived areas, with the purpose of providing them an opportunity to build character and learn important life skills, such as; LBGF is a youth development organisation that uses the Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) model, with age appropriate skills activities to assist in the development stages that all individuals go through, whether they are physical, emotional or social. More than a golf learning centre, LBGF provides a positive impact on children, their families and their communities through the great game of golf. It provides the perfect framework for optimal growth, development and maturation through golf. Mission Statement 4. Main Objectives of LBGF LBGF’s main objective is to enrich the lives of disadvantaged children through golf and ensure the coaching philosophy and structured levels of progression are consistently managed and implemented at all LBGF Projects. Create national and international awareness of the LBGF Projects and the coaching model. Implement a corporate development process to align with business partners that share the same vision and looking to invest in their Corporate Social Investment. Training coaches, mentors and assistants for each individual project. Ensure each LBGF Project has a LBGF certified coach, mentor and an assistant. Integrate non-athletic components into LBGF Projects, such as educational assistance, counselling, medical evaluation and community service. Integrity Self-Respect Courtesy Sportsmanship Confidence Perseverance Patience Social Integration Punctuality Responsibility Judgement
  • 3. Engage with Local, Provincial and National Government to identify new project areas, assistance in creating awareness and the development of corporate alliances, enabling LBGF to achieve enrolment targets. All LBGF children will become members of a golf club and affiliated to the South Africa Golf Association and Junior Golf Foundation, with official handicaps, by 31 August 2014. Produce Provincial golfers by the end of the 3rd (third) year of operation. Implement a state of the art training academy by the end of the 3rd (third) year of operation. 2. LBGF Coaching Philosophy The LBGF Coaching Philosophy is based on the Long Term Athlete Development Model, combined with providing every child with the opportunity to build character and learn important life-skills along the way. In each level of the coaching model, LBGF develops children’s fundamental movement skills and fundamental golf skills to create physical literacy. More so, LBGF has a duty to provide every child in the program, with the physical, mental and emotional skills to excel in life and to make an informed choice of career and excel in it. The LBGF “Steps” combined with a positive and fun environment forms the core of the LBGF coaching levels, providing the perfect platform for the children to be themselves, to learn and grow and to gain the necessary physical, mental and emotional skills to be the best that they can be. 3. Long Term Athlete Development Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) in golf is an approach to physical activity and golf, that focuses on key principles and windows of trainability of individual development. LTAD is the pathway or map of player development from starting golf to becoming active for life, using age specific exercises to create a platform for maximising the golfer’s potential. Important LTAD Principles 10 Year Rule FUNdamentals LTAD experts are of the opinion that it takes ten (10) years or ten thousand (10 000) hours of training to reach elite levels. There has to be an emphasis put on having FUN while mastering Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) and Fundamental Sports Skills (FSS), to become proficient in golf. Transfer of Learning Using non-golf specific activities can assist in learning golf sequencing and fundamentals. Basically, by asking children to perform a task or game not related to golf can help them learn golf fundamentals.
  • 4. Developmental Age Chronological age (How old a child is) and Developmental Age (A child’s Stage of physical, mental, emotional and intellectual maturity) are very different. Two children of the same chronological age can be several years apart in developmental age. All three boys are the same biological age! Phases of Skills Development LTAD develops children in phases using age groups. Coaches should. However, consider development age as well. Windows of Opportunity The five (5) S’s : Skills, Strength, Suppleness, Stamina and Speed can be learnt in a child’s development, more effectively at certain stages or windows. Golf Physical Literacy is the Key to Success Physical Literacy = Fundamental Movement Skills + Fundamental Golf Skills Children who are physically literate are able to move with competence and confidence in a wide variety of physical activities in several activities that help the child’s healthy development. Physical literacy is just as important as the ability to read and write. The most important step towards developing physical literacy is mastering fundamental movement skills as this provides the foundation for mastering fundamental sports skills, or in our case, fundamental golf skills.
  • 5. Fundamental Movement Skills Generally, fundamental movement skills are developed in children between the ages of five (5) and ten (10) years old. Fundamental skills include: ABC’s of Athleticism •Agility •Balance •Coordination •Speed Stability Skills •Balance •Bending •Turning •Twisting •Transferring Weight •Stretching Locomotive Skills •Running •Skipping •Jumping •Dodging Awareness Skills Kinetic Space Manipulative Skills •Striking •Dribbling •Kicking •Throwing Fundamental Golf Skills In order to develop into fundamental golf skills, children need to have good fundamental movement skills. Fundamental golf skills to be mastered are: Putting Chipping Pitching TheLBGFSteps BunkerPlay Ball Position Grip Alignment Stance Posture Balance OnCourse LBGF Steps The “Y” Set up Backswing = Follow Through Balance Alignment Speed Control Reading the Green The “Y” Set up The Steps Distance Control “Clockface Technique” Club Selction The Steps & Set Up Distance Control Stance Alignment Club Selection Game Plan Distance Control Course Management LTAD Development Stages There are seven (7) stages in the LTAD Model: 1. Stage 1 – Active Start (0-6 years old) Boys and girls need to be involved in daily active play which provides the foundation to learn fundamental movement skills. Unstructured active play that involves a variety of body movements enables children to develop agility, balance, coordination and speed. The Active Start stage develops brain function, physical coordination, gross motor skills, posture and balance, It also helps children to build confidence, social skills, emotional control and imagination. Children should treat physical activity as fun and an exciting part of everyday life.
  • 6. 2. Stage 2 – FUNdamentals (Girls 6-8 years old & Boys 6-9 years old) A critical stage in LTAD, the FUNdamentals are important in providing A solid platform for the growth of physical literacy. If children fail to develop physical literacy prior to the growth spurt in puberty, they will have limited ability to develop sport-specific skills at stages of training and development. Children in the FUNdamental stage improve their fundamental movement skills. Skill development should happen through a combination of unstructured play in safe and challenging environments and quality instruction .Children this age should not specialize in a single sport and should be encouraged to participate in as many sports as possible. Children this age have a strong sense of what is “fair” and should be introduced to the simple rules and ethics of sports. Basic rules, tactics, decision making and ethics of sport can be introduced. Important Aspects of the FUNdamentals Stage Hand and foot speed can be developed during this stage. If this sensitive period of accelerated adaption to develop speed is missed, body speed later in life may be jeopardised. Children must take part in a wide range of sports. It is important that all children master fundamental movement skills before fundamental sports skills are introduced. Strength, flexibility and endurance have to be developed at this stage. This should be done through games and fin activities. 3. Stage 3 – Learn to Play (Girls 8 – 11 years old & Boys 9 – 12 years old) One of the most important periods of motor development for children. Children are developmentally ready to acquire the fundamental golf skills that are the corner-stones of athletic development. Objectives in this stage: Develop all fundamental movement skills and coaching of general overall golf skills. Develop strength using exercises that use the child’s own body weight, as well as medicine balls. Introducing hopping and bounding games and exercises, or wheeling up gradients to assist in strength development. Develop endurance through games and relays. Develop flexibility through exercises. Further development of speed using activities that focus on agility, quickness and change of direction during the warm up. Structuring competition to address differences in training age and abilities. Encourage unstructured play. 4. Stage 4 – Train to Play (Girls 11 – 15 years old & Boys 12 – 16 years old) The train to play stage of LTAD is the learning to cope with the physical and mental challenges of competition. Furthermore, it is important to optimise the skill set and build on competitive experiences. The train to play phase is one of the most important stages of athletic preparation
  • 7. Because this is when golf specific development really begins. It is Important to note that during this stage, children can be heavily Influenced (in good and bad ways) due to factors such as good basic Skill competency and stable mechanics. Key concepts of the game that would be introduced during this stage will be; PUTTING: Eyes over the balls, putter face square to intended target at impact, grip with both thumbs down the shaft, ball position forward of centre, handle slightly forward at impact. BALL POSITION FOR ALL SWINGS: The ball is positioned appropriately in relation to the child’s sternum given the chosen club and desired shot trajectory. WEIGHT TRANSFER: Complete weight transfer to the forward side should occur. HANDLE OF THE CLUB: The handle is set forward of the clubhead at address and remains in this position through impact. In terms of skill acquisition and development of physical abilities, the emphasis should be placed on general physical conditioning and health, which includes seven (7) key physiological proficiencies; BALANCE CORE STRENGTH AND STABILITY STRENGTH AND POWER CARDIOVASCULAR ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE SKILLS (Nutrition, lifestyle and environmental factors) 5. Stage 5 – Learn to Compete (Girls 15 – 17 years old & Boys 16 – 18 years old) The development that has occurred in the first four (4) stages of LTAD come to fruition in the Leran to Compete Stage. The emphasis in this stage is all about execution when it counts. Children must test their technical competencies in different circumstances and conditions. Learn to Compete To-Do List Provide year-round, high intensity, individual event and golf position-specific training. Teach the golfers to perform their learned skills under various competitive situations during training. Greater fitness programs, recovery programs, psychological preparation and technical development. Key concepts that are introduced at this stage include; PITCHING (shot selection, stance balanced, tempo) CHIPPING (Loft of the club, stance, ball position, grip) BUNKERS (face angle, stance, ball position, spin versus roll) LIES (Uphill, downhill, side-hill, ball position, body angle, balance, tempo) 6. Stage 6 – Train to Compete (Girls 17 – 23 years old & Boys 18 – 23 years old) The objective in the Train to Compete Stage is to provide high intensity individual and golf-specific training year round. At least half of the training is devoted to the development of technical and tactical skills and fitness improvement. The other half is devoted to competition and competition- specific training.
  • 8. Train to Compete To-Do List Year round, high intensity, individual-specific training. Teach players to perform the basic and golf specific skills under a variety of tournament conditions during training. Better fitness programs, recovery programs, psychological preparation and technical development in each individual player. 40% of time spent on developing technical and tactical skills and 60% on competition-specific training. Maximise strength training. Updating, reviewing and understanding the importance of performance and personal goal setting. Recognize and plan for the appropriate level of competition. Key Concepts of the game to be introduced at this stage; ESCAPE SHOTS: Fades, draws, ball position, body alignment, clubface angle. TROUBLE SHOTS: Punch shots, low shots, high shots, ball position, club selection, FAIRWAY BUNKERS: Club Selection, “quiet legs”, ball position, 7. Stage 7 – Learn to Excel (Girls 23 – 28 years old & Boys 23 – 29 years old) The final stage of preparation! The player will possess, firmly established, physical, technical, tactical, mental and golf capacities. The training focus is on the optimisation of performance. Train to Excel To-Do List Train players to peak for major competitions. Training to competition ratio needs to be 25% : 75% Allow players to make decisions about their training regime. Critical evaluation program assessing preparation and performance for each tournament. Physical training must use the most advanced techniques and sports science methodology. Use state-of-the-art testing and physical fitness programs. Key Concepts that would be introduced at this stage include; FULL SWING: Impact position, hips cleared, swing plane. TEMPO: Same tempo with each club, takeaway to impact. BALANCE: Full swings and partial swings, weight transfer throughout each swing. ALIGNMENT: aim, club alignment, body to intended target. TROUBLE SHOTS / SHORT GAME: Use the clubface, buried lies, left handed, one handed. 8. Stage 8 – Excel ( 23 years old +) The player achieves success on the national and international stage as a high-ranked amateur or competes as a professional golfer. Excel To-Do List Maintain a high level of fitness to avoid the risk of fatigue or injury. Knowledge on how to deal with mental and physical fatigue. Introduce financial management and travel practices. Detailed psychological and biomechanical testing (three or four time a year) to optimise physical performance. Selective about which events to compete in and implement a stringent evaluation program. Set objectives of very high standards of accomplishments in competitions.
  • 9. Key Concepts at this stage; FULL SWING: Impact position and swing plane. GREENSIDE BUNKERS: shaft, angle, spin, loft. BALL FLIGHT: manipulate ball to desired target, clubface position, body position. BALL FLIGHT PATTERN: Predominant flight, body set up, swing path. LONG TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL HOW DO YOU KEEP CHILDREN INVOLVED AND EXCITED ABOUT GOLF?
  • 10. LBGF has a unique coaching method of introducing children to the basic and important fundamentals of golf, called “THE LBGF STEPS”. While trying to teach children through a language barrier, the steps were discovered by using the universal language of counting. Every child in South Africa can count to ten (10) and by breaking down the fundamentals into ten (10) basic steps, all children can learn sound fundamentals from introduction. It is extremely important that every coach understands the steps and the correct positioning in each of the ten (10) steps. The steps cannot be changed or modified and every step is important in sequence. A step cannot be missed and a step can not be introduced, over and above the LBGF Steps. These are the LBGF Steps: 4. The “Steps” The golfer stands completely upright with feet together and the golf club in the right hand against the right hand side of the body. The ball position is in the middle of the feet. If a line is drawn along the tips of the toes, it will point towards the target. The golfers head and chest face towards the ball. The right hand is placed on the golf club and lifted directly in front of the golf. The placement of the right hand on the golf club is vital. The right hand holds the club on the grip end closest to the club head. The right thumb points towards the club head. Most children’s golf clubs have a line or arrow on the grip where the right thumb should be placed. It is important to ensure the clubface is correctly aligned to the target.
  • 11. While holding Step 2 with the right hand on the grip, the left hand is placed on the opposite end of the grip as far away from the right hand as possible. 1 inch from the End. The left hand is placed on the grip in the same way the right hand is on the grip. The left thumb must point towards the club head. Both thumbs should now both be pointing upwards towards the club head. Arms should be extended and as straight as possible. Step 4 is when the hands come together and join. The left hand remains in position and the right hand slides down the grip with the right hand covering the left thumb. It is very important that the left hand remains in position and the right hand slides down. An interlock grip is preferable but not important. Both thumbs should still be pointing to the Club head and the left thumb is covered. With the arms still extended, the club head is place behind the ball, keeping the legs straight. This is the most important part of Step 5. Ensure the golfer’s back remains straight and bends over to the ball from the waist. The golfer should adjust their distance from the ball to ensure the ball is positioned in the middle of the club face. The golfer’s shoulders and hips should automatically be aligned to the target with the left should positioned slightly higher than the right shoulder.
  • 12. Step 6 involves the golfer taking their stance. The left foot moves a little (one quarter) and the right foot moves further (three quarters). This should position the golf ball between the centre of the stance and the left heel. It is very important to ensure the golfer moves their feet in a straight line towards or away from the target. Flex the knees little to set the correct posture with a good solid foundation. Both feet should be firmly and evenly placed on the ground. The spine angle (back) should be as straight as possible with the golfer maintaining an athletic posture. The arms should be hanging straight down from the shoulders to allow the shoulders to turn in the swing. The golfer looks at the target and then returns their eyes to the ball. This will allow the golfer to not only focus on the target but will also provide a visual alignment check. Step 9 is the golfer swinging the club and striking the golf ball. The golfer must keep their eyes on the ball. Step 10 is the finish position with the golfer finishing with their chest facing the target and all their weight transferred on to their left side (for right handed golfers). The right foot should be pointed with the toes on the ground and the heel in the air. The golfer should be able to hold this position for 5 seconds or more.
  • 13. The arms and golf club form a “Y” which is maintained throughout the chip. There should be no wrist hinge and the shoulders do all the work. The other important fundamental is that the Backswing must equal the follow through. The Chipping The steps remain the same with a slight modification to Step 6. With Step 6 (taking the stance) the left foot moves but the right foot remains In its original position. With chipping, there are a couple of important fundamentals to remember and ensure the children follow; The “Y” set up – Backswing equals Follow Through The “Y” set up and Backswing = Follow through principles applied to putting too! The Steps “Y” Setup Backswing = Follow through The Path to great Chipping & Putting
  • 14. The LBGF program is not only about teaching children to play golf. The Program is designed to enrich the lives of disadvantaged children through Golf. In order for the children to excel at golf and life, it is important to teach them life-skills that will enable them to become adults with high morals and values. Golf is the perfect tool to teach the children these values and the importance of each value, as they grow. The life-skills the children learn in the LBGF program gives them a good, solid grounding to make informed decisions and become the best adults they can be. The LBGF program teaches children the following life-skills; a) INTEGRITY Golf is a game of etiquette and composure. Players are responsible for their actions and personal conduct on the golf course even at times when others may not be looking. b) SELF-RESPECT In golf it is important to show respect for oneself, playing partners, fellow competitors, the golf course, and for the honour and traditions of the game. c) COURTESY A round of golf should begin and end with a handshake between fellow competitors. Players also should be still and quiet while others are preparing and performing a shot. d) SPORTSMANSHIP Players must know and abide by the rules of golf and be able to conduct themselves in a kind and respectful manner towards others even in a competitive game. e) CONFIDENCE Confidence plays a key role in the level of play that one achieves. Players can increase confidence in their abilities by being positive and focusing on something they are doing well regardless of the outcome. f) PERSEVERANCE To succeed in golf, players must continue through bad breaks and their own mistakes, while learning from past experiences. g) PATIENCE Golf is a sport that not only will teach you patience, but also how to live in the present. It requires both personal patience as well as patience for other people. h) SOCIAL INTEGRATION Golf will allow disadvantaged communities to move into mainstream society. It allows the children to feel part of a society that is based on principles, not race, religion or status. 5. Life Skills Through Golf INTEGRITY SELF-RESPECT COURTESY SPORTSMANSHIP CONFIDENCE PERSEVERANCE PATIENCE SOCIAL INTEGRATION
  • 15. All coaches are required to sign the LBGF Coaches Code of Conduct Before commencing the LBGF Coaching Development Program. LBGF COACHES CODE OF CONDUCT 1. I will honour the fact that LBGF exist for the disadvantaged children and not for adults. Expected Behaviour: Maintain a positive, helpful and supportive attitude. Fulfil the expected role of a LBGF coach to adopt a “children first” philosophy. Allow and encourage children to listen, learn and play hard within the rules. Place emphasis on fun and participation. 2. I will do my very best to make each coaching session as much fun as possible for every child that attends. Expected Behviour: Recognise the differences of each child and treat each child as an individual while demonstrating concern for their individual needs and well being. Encourage all children, regardless of skill level, to be included as a member of the team. Recognise that some physical tasks, drills and demands are not appropriate for all the children. Recognise that children may vary greatly in physical, social and emotional maturation and consider these factors when setting up competitions and when interacting with the children. 3. I will do my best to organise sessions that are fun and challenging for all the children. Expected Behaviour Make sessions fun, interesting, productive and aimed at improving all the children’s skills and individual abilities, while having FUN! Devoting appropriate time to the individual improvement of every child. Make sure that no child becomes bored or feels left out. Stick to the session plan with strict timings to ensure the session is kept to the required length. 4. I will exercise good sportsmanship by demonstrating support for all the children. Expected Behaviour Adopting the position, teaching and demonstrating that it is our basic moral code to trat others as we would like to be treated. Abiding by and supporting the rules of the game as well as the spirit of the game. Providing an environment which promotes fair and equitable competition. Use the influential position of coach as an opportunity to promote, teach and expect fair sportsmanship and fair play. 6. LBGF Coaches Code of Conduct & Code of Ethics
  • 16. 5. I will make sure all the children play in a safe and healthy environment. Expected Behaviour Conduct a safety briefing before every session and ensure that all children are aware that golf, golf clubs, balls and equipment are potentially dangerous. Maintain a high level of awareness of potentially unsafe conditions. Protect children from sexual molestations, assault, physical abuse and emotional abuse. Correcting or avoiding unsafe practice or playing conditions. Make sure that all the children are provided with adequate adult supervision while under the coach’s care. 6. I will insist that every child exercises good sportsmanship towards coaches, officials and other children. Expected Behaviour Becoming knowledgeable, understanding and supportive of all applicable game rules, regulations and policies. Teaching and making sure all the children abide by these rule, so that with this understanding good sportsmanship can be maintained. Teaching techniques that reduce the risk of injury to both coaches and children. 7. I will provide a golf environment for all the children that is free of drugs, tobacco and alcohol. I will refrain from their use at all LBGF sessions. Expected Behaviour Being alcohol and drug free at all sessions or functions or in the presence of the children. Refrain from the use of any type of tobacco products at all sessions or in the presence of the children. Refrain from providing any type of alcohol, drug or tobacco products to any children. Encourage parents from the public use of tobacco products or alcohol at sessions. 8. I will place the safety and physical development of my players ahead of my personal desire to win. Expected Behaviour Use appropriate language in appropriate tones when interacting with children, coaches, mentors, parents and spectators. At no time is profanity acceptable! Include all children in team activities without regard to race, religion, gender, body type, national origin, ancestry, disability or ability. Treat all children, coaches, mentors, parents and spectators with dignity and respect. Coach and play within the rules and by the spirit of the rules. Encourage the children to participate in other sports to promote all aspects of their development. 9. I will support other coaches and mentors. 10. I will remember that children play and coaches and mentors TEACH. Anytime someone steps out of their area of responsibility, a strain is created on every other area involved.
  • 17. LBGF COACHES CODE OF ETHICS 1. Always remember that children participate for fun, enjoyment and winning is only part of the fun. 2. Never use negative ridicule or shout at children for making a mistake or not winning. 3. Be considerate and reasonable in your demands on children’s time, energy and enthusiasm. 4. Always operate within the code of conduct, rules and fair spirit and instruct the children to the same. 4. Always ensure the time children spend with you as a coach is a positive experience. All children are deserving of equal attention and opportunities. 4. Try to avoid spending too much time with the more talented and more skilful children. 4. Ensure the golf equipment and age appropriate and maintained in a safe condition. Ensure the children use the correct sized golf clubs. 5. Display control, respect and professionalism to all involved in the sport. This includes, coaches, officials, administrators, the media, parents, spectators and the children. Encourage the children to do the same, be a great role model. 6. Always show concern toward sick and injured children. Follow the advice of a trained medical professional when determining when determining whether an injured child is ready to recommence training and competition. 7. Where appropriate obtain qualifications and keep up to date with the latest coaching practices and the latest principles of growth and development of children. 8. Any contact with a child should be appropriate to the situation and necessary for the player’s skill development or medical care. 12. Consider it an honour and a privilege to coach the children. 13. Respect the rights of all children regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion. 14. Keep in mind at all times that you are a LBGF coach and that the session and experience is for the children, not for the adults. 15. Always keep to the session plan and the timings of such session plan. 16. Every session must start with a safety briefing, ensuring the children understand what the “Safe Zone” and “Strike Area” is and what behaviour is expected form the children. 17. Ensure that no child becomes bored and is left standing around. It is important to ensure all children participate in all the activities and feel part of the team. 18. Only use positive comments and praise the children for their efforts. Never laugh at a child or use language or tone that is aggressive or negative. 19. Model grace, dignity and composure regardless of the outcome of the game. 20. Refrain from all manner of personal abuse and harrassment of the children, whether verbal, physical, emotional or sexual. Practices Principles Values
  • 18. LBGF COACH CHARACTERISTICS What are the characteristics of a LBGF Coach that sets them apart from other coaches? Listed below are the essential qualities of a LBGF Coach; 1. Must see self as a teacher: Not just a coach. Your main responsibility is to educate by teaching skills of the game and “Life-Skills”. 2. Must be motivated to help: Your ego can be a major limitation. Showcase the children, not yourself. Success is measured by growth, not wins. 3. Must make games and sessions fund: Praise the children and be careful to avoid shouting. 4. Transform negative into positive: With so much failure associated with youth sports, staying positive is vital. 5. Must be a student of the game: Learn as much as you can. Be receptive to new information. 6. Must be organised: Establish practice, game and emergency plans. 7. Must emphasize effort not results. 8. Must establish rules and enforce them: Where there is no discipline, there is no learning. Be Fair and Equal. 9. Be a positive role model: You are a role model. How you are remembered is up to YOU. FUN Positive Role Model Discipline Respect Enthusiastic Motivated Rules Fair Play Integrity Sportsmanship
  • 19. The LBGF Coaching Model is a comprehensive and meticulous coaching model to ensure all enrolled students are given the best possible opportunity to excel in golf and in life. The implementation of LBGF’s Coaching Model and Plan does not require a highly technical golf coaching facility or the use of private golf facilities, initially. It focuses on getting as many children into the program as possible, using the current school infrastructure and providing a “fun” introduction to golf, in the children’s environment. LBGF’s coaching plan is simple, but highly productive and certainly cost effective; LBGF Coaching Curriculum Timeline: Curriculum based on LBGF 5 Level Golf Specific LTAD Coaching Model (Fundamental Movement Skills + Fundamental Golf Skills = Physical Literacy) 7. LBGF Coaching Model Phase 6: Year 6 – 10 •Train to Excel Phase 5: Year 2 - 5 •Train to Compete Phase 4: 13 – 24 Months • Train to Play & Learn to Compete Phase 3: 7 – 12 Months •Learn to Play Phase 2: 4 – 6 Months •Active Start & FUNdamentals with Level 1 Assessment Phase 1: 1 – 3 Months •Active Start & FUNdamentals Phase 5 Practice & Playing Schedule Regime Training – Physical and Mental Competing in Provincial and National Tournaments Phase 4 Practicing at Golf Driving Range Playing on Golf Course Training – Physical and Mental Competing in Local Competitions Phase 3 Coaching at Golf Course Driving Range Playing on the Golf Course Phase 2 Coaching at School Grounds Golf Course Driving Range Phase 1 Coaching at School Grounds – Introduction to Golf
  • 20. Month 1 – 3 : Active Start / FUNdamentals Coaching Sessions conducted at school premises on sports field or in school hall. Objectives: Fundamental Movement Skills & Steps Fundamentals. Coaching Session: one x 2 hour session per school per week. a) The LBGF Coaching Process / Phases Month 4 -6: Active Start / FUNdamentals Coaching Sessions shared between school premises and golf course driving range. Objectives: Fundamental Movement Skills & Steps Fundamentals. Coaching Session: Two x 2 hour session per school per week. Children allocated groups according to Level 1 Assessment Month 7 - 12 : Learning to Play Coaching Sessions and “Play it Forward” golf rounds at golf club facilities. Objectives: Fundamental Sports Skills, Rules and Etiquette. Official Handicap & Affiliation to KZNLGA. Level 2 & 3 Completion. Coaching Sessions: one x 2 hour session and one x 9 Holes per week. Month 13 – 24 : Training to Play / Learning to Compete Coaching Sessions and golf rounds at golf club facilities. Objectives: Competitive Training and local monthly competitions (18 Holes). Academy Level Commences. Coaching Session: two x 2 hour sessions, Individual practice session, one x 18 hole rounds per week. Competition play (local) one per month. Year 2 – 5 : Training to Compete Coaching Sessions and golf rounds at golf club facilities. Biomechanics, Bio Kinetics and Gym Work. Objectives: Competitive training, local, provincial and national tournaments. Academy Level completion Coaching Sessions: three x 2 hour sessions, Individual practice session, two x 18 hole rounds per week. Tournament play as per set tournament schedule. Year 6 – 10 : Training to Excel Coaching Sessions and golf rounds at golf club facilities. Biomechanics, Bio Kinetics and Gym Work. Objectives: Competitive Training , local , provincial and national tournaments, diet, nutrition, biomechanics, bio kinetics and gym regime. Elite Level Commences. Coaching Session: three x 2 hour sessions, Individual practice session, two x 18 hole rounds per week. Tournament play as per set tournament schedule.
  • 21. b) Cyclone Zone In the FUNdamental phase of the coaching model, the ideal format for teaching children, between the ages of 5 – 10 years old, is known as the Cyclone Zone. It focuses on Fundamental Movement Skills in Children. 12 stations can be set up as shown below; AGILITY are games that involve speed, like dodgeball, tag, open-gates. BALANCE Balance Beams, obstacle courses and jungle gyms. STRIKING Golf, SNAG®, Cricket Tennis. THROWING Frisbee throws, tennis ball throws, golf ball throws. CATCHING Catching various sized balls. KICKING Soccer, passing and dribbling a soccer ball. JUMPING Tennis ball hopping, hop on one leg. LOCOMOTION Skipping, Hopping, Running, Tennis ball pick up. VISUALISATION / AWARENESS Putting, Lawn Bowls, Rolling. ROTATION Hoola Hoops, Sitting Chain. PUSH/PULL Tug-of-war, Monkey Bars, Jungle Gym. CORE STRENGTH Exercise ball balance, monkey walk, Plank, Bridge
  • 22. b) Smash Zone Skills learnt in the Smash Zone are more challenging than the Cyclone Zone. Ideal for children between the ages of 11 – 15 years old. Golf skills, such as Putting, Chipping, Pitching, Bunkers and Full Swings are included in the Cyclone Zone. Every child goes through each station of the cycle for approximately 10 minutes. After each station, the children Should be asked question about the activity just completed. THROWING Baseball throw, javelin, discus and shot put. HORIZONTAL STRIKING Baseball and Tennis GROUND BASED STRIKING Hockey Dribbling, Cricket, Rounders. WRIST RELEASE Frisbee throws and Table Tennis UPPER BODY MOBILITY / STABILITY Medicine Balls and Exercise Ball. LOWER BODY MOBILITY / STABILITY Lunges, Medicine Ball and Exercise Ball. ABCs Hopping, Agility Ladder, Kicking PUTTING Level Evaluations, Putting Games. FULL SWING Steps, Range Work CHIPPING Steps, Y , Backswing = Follow Through
  • 23. Golf equipment and the game of golf can be very dangerous! It has the potential to cause harm to children and coaches. The health and safety of the children must be a top priority. A vital part of planning sessions is to evaluate the health and safety issues, ensure a safety briefing is conducted before the session begins, ensure the proper health and safety equipment is present and for the coach to be aware of potentially dangerous situations at all times. Some of the main issues, include; Adequate space between children. Make the children aware of the space around them and the potential dangers of swinging a golf club near other children or coaches. Ensure the equipment being used is suitable. This includes the size and weight of the golf club, as well as the condition of the grip and club. Ensure the children know where the “Safe Zone” is and what the rules for this area are. Also, ensure the children are aware of where they should stand when they are striking the golf ball and where they stand if they are not. Make children aware of the “Strike Zone” and that they are not permitted to walk in this area or in front of the rope. Safety Briefings must be held before every session regardless of the children’s level or epxerience. In order to maintain the equipment in a safe manner, it is important to make sure the children clean the clubs after use and put them back in the correct bag. A First Aid box must be available at every session and appropriately kitted out. A mobile phone with airtime is imperative at every session. Emergency numbers and the parent’s numbers should be on hand and easily accessible. Ensure that the children know how they should put their clubs down when instructed. This should be with the face of the club head facing the ground. Ensure children do not swing the golf clubs aimlessly and when they are not actually at the strike zone or designated area. All children must complete a registration form clearly identifying any medical conditions. Explain the rules and safety aspects of all the activities during a session. Always think about the safety aspects of every activity and be aware of any potentially dangerous situations. First Aid Kit A first aid kit should be on hand at every session. The contents of the first aid kit should include; 8. Health and Safety Plasters Antiseptic Ointment Bandages / Sling/ Straps Antiseptic Gauze Latex Gloves Ice Pack Dettol Cotton Wool Scissors Safety Pins Eye Pad Sterilised Water
  • 24. “First impressions are lasting”. A child’s first impression of golf is no different and it is the job of an LBGF coach to ensure that this impression is one of FUN and ENJOYMENT. Every child should want to Return to the next session. Every child is different and it is important to think about, plan for, and Interact with the individual, as well as the group as a whole. Consider how each child can be different; Some are quiet; others are noisy. Some like to spend time by themselves; others like being in a group. Some are shy; other are outgoing. Some can handle new situations easily; other like to stand back and watch. How does a LBGF Coach get to know individuals? Learn children’s names, greet them by name and take every opportunity to have individual conversations with them. Be careful about talking only or mainly to the whole group or numbers of children at a time. You don’t really get to know somebody unless you interact individually. As you get to know the children, try to notice, comment or talk about something that is unique to that child – a new haircut, new clothes, a comment about something you did, something you read or heard that you think he or she may be interested in. Pay attention to a child who is trying to tell you something. This is a challenge as you have to maintain supervision and awareness of what is going on around you while engaging with the child. Be a good listener and observer. Spend time just watching children interact with each other and engage with the material. Listen in on conversations. Make notes so that you can remember and make constructive use of the information. Accept individual differences in children. This doesn’t mean tolerating disruptive or destructive behaviour, but it does mean working with the fact that each child is different. Be aware of your own notions or biases of the “ideal” child. Think about how these ideals might affect your interactions with children. Think about what kinds of behaviour or characteristics really bother you in children. Acknowledge these biases to yourself and other coaches, and then work against them as you interact with children. When a child has an additional need such as a disability, or when there is a language or cultural barrier or a behavioural problem, try to figure out ways to deal constructively with it. It is important to know children as individuals and to put that knowledge into practice. It is the responsibility of all LBGF Coaches to tune into each child in their project/s, get to know each one well and try to understand their individual learning and development needs in order to work out what can be done to support them, as they develop. The importance of observing cannot be underestimated in this process. 9. Individual Needs of Children
  • 25. Player Centred Coaching is about giving the player the opportunity to be involved in the decision making. It is about empowering them to make choices and develop higher levels of motivation. This does not meant that the players can do what they want or about the coach being soft or weak minded or allowing players to be undisciplined. One of the features of player centred development is to plan for longer term objectives even if it means accepting short term set backs. Player centred development encompasses ideas such as game sense, teaching games for understanding and long term athlete development. It also encompasses concepts such as emotional intelligence and player empowerment. To unlock the full potential of a player, a coach should be “learner-centred”. This means the coach works in partnership with the player to identify and achieve the player’s goals (not the coach’s goals, or the goals they assume, or think, the player should have). This process includes: Giving the player a clear picture of what stage they are at (awareness). Shaping a strategy for the player to progress towards achieving their goal at an accelerated rate (Goal Setting) Determining what the player is willing to do to achieve their goals (Commitment). Every individual is unique when it comes to learning. There are three (3) “Learning Laws” that every coach should know; 10. Player Centred Development Awareness Goal Setting Commitment Player Centred Development Players require a desire to learn Players learn in different ways Players learn at different speeds
  • 26. To remember all the main factors for Player Centred Development, We can organise them in the form of an acronym; SKILLS IN LEARNING Learning golf is a more complex process than just having a coach telling a player how to make certain movements. There are many skills in golf, and many ways they can be taught. How a coach views and handles they skills they teach can either shortcut the learning process or make it longer and unnatural. ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING A coach can help a player pass through the learning process smoothly by creating a fund and effective learning environment. TOOLS FOR LEARNING There are important “power tools” a coach can use to speed up learning. Players change more readily if the change comes from within the player, rather than imposed from outside. By using questions and encouragements, a coach communicates with the player rather than at the player. The result is an experience of “guided discovery”. STAGES OF LEARNING Every player will pass through three (3) stages of learning before they can use new skills in match play: Stage 1: Understanding Moving a player from “unconscious incompetence” to “conscious incompetence”. This is where a player is unaware of what they are performing poorly to a player who is aware of how to perform successfully but unable to do it consistently. Stage 2: Repetition Practicing the skill over and over to “groove” it. Moving a player from “Conscious Incompetence” to “Conscious Competence” where the player can only perform successfully if they focus on the performance. Stage 3: Automatic Decision Making Moving a player from “Conscious Competence” to “Unconscious Competence” where the player selects the correct time to use the skill in competition and performs successfully automatically. Each stage has its own unique goals, pitfalls and procedures. A coach should be able to recognise which stage a student is in to lead them in the most effective type of training. If a coach skips, or poorly develops a stage, the result is incomplete skill development. Being learner-centred dramatically increases a coach’s professionalism and promotes the coach to constantly look for new and creative ways to help players. LBGF Children deserve nothing less!
  • 27. What is an Effective Coach? a) An Effective Coach Is well organised, on time and plans ahead. Abides by the principles of fair play. Is a good communicator. Is committed to developing their players to perform as well as possible. Reflects on what they are doing and tries to improve all the time. Understands the needs, strengths and weaknesses of individual players. Has a genuine concern to help others develop physically, mentally and emotionally. Is motivated and enthusiastic. Is able and willing to learn. Cares about the well being of the children. b) How Children Learn Children learnt best when they are motivated and challenged. They must carry out the task in real context and are successful. Different children learn in different ways; AUDITORY – Learn best by hearing – The coach explains a skill. COMBINED - Uses a variety of senses – The coach shows the skill and discusses key points. KINESTHETIC – Learns by doing – The coach lets the child do the skill. VISUAL – Learns by seeing – The coach demonstrates the skill. 11. Effective Coaching Coaching Children •Having fun is the most important at all levels of sport, but especially for children •Consider ways to modify golf to suit their age, size and ability with emphasis on developing Fundamental Skills •Simplify the Rules •Increase / Decrease the size of the target •Increase/Decrease the distance to the target •Have fewer players in a team •Use equipment appropriate to players size and strength Why do Children Play Golf? •To have fun and success •Being involved and not getting bored •Challenging matching their stage of development •Opportunity to meet new friends
  • 28. c) Understanding Developing Skills There are a number of ways to develop children’s skills and understanding. It is important to understand the following in developing skills; Children generally enjoy games and allows learning in real context, which enhances long term learning. It allows children to transfer skills into competition and develops children’s ability to practice and make decisions under pressure. d) Coaches Role in using Games to Teach Skills When implementing the games, a coach’s role is to; Set up the games and the rules. Decide what questions to ask the children so they can learn about a particular aspect of their performance. Ensure the children play by the rules laid down. Playing the by the rules is more important than winning. Make sure all the children participate equally in the game. Encourage the children to encourage each other. e) Communicating Effectively Effective communication is a vital key to success and building relationships with children. Constant and regular communication often deals with little problems before they become big problems. Good communication is more than just talking; It is the way you deal with people. It is how you listen. It is how you ask questions. It is the tone of your voice. It is your body language. Consider the stage of development of the children Start in a simple way that ensures success, enjoyment and safety Gradually modify the game / activity /drill to make it more challenging Learning is easier for children when it occurs in a game or game like activity
  • 29. Introduction Safety Briefing Warm Up Development Cool Down Evaluation COMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY WITH CHILDREN Elements of an Effective Coaching Session How to Communicate Effectively with Children Greet the children warmly, with a smile and by their name. Dress appropriately and make sure you look smart. Speak Clearly. Listen Carefully. Give and receive feedback. Be positive and encouraging. Be specific so the children are clear about what you expect. Focus on behaviour or actions that can be changed. Use words that children can understand – Keep it simple! Encourage the children to give you feedback about how the performance felt to them. Ask questions to show that their contributions are important. Be aware of your body language and the tone of your voice.
  • 30. Example of a Session Plan 12. Session Plans SESSION PLAN Project Name: LBGF Sobantu Project Date: 31 Jan 14 Venue: Howick GC Time: 15:30 – 17:30 Duration: 2 Hours No of Students: 32 Age Range: 6 – 17 years Session Number: 1 Special Requirements: Cooler with Ice Fruit Juice Sweets First Aid Box Plastic Cups Registration Forms Equipment Required: Golf Clubs Range Balls - 400 Cones Chipping Baskets Soccer Balls Tennis Balls Rope and Pegs Tee Pegs Soccer Balls Cleaning Towels Frisbees Sharks Hands Hoola Hoops Alignment Sticks Objectives of Session 1. Complete “STEPS” Fundamentals. 2. Chipping Fundamentals : “Y” Set Up and Backswing = Follow-through. 3. Etiquette: Do not move and remain silent when another player is hitting. Stations to be Set Up 1. Range – 10 Stations with “Strike Zone” ropes 2. Chipping Station – 10 Stations 3. Games Stations – a) Dodge Ball b) Obstacle Course 1 4. Safe Zone Program of Events / Session Plan: 1. Introduction & Safety Briefing Duration: 5 mins 2. Dynamic Stretching Duration: 10 mins 3. Warm Up Game: Dodge Ball - Cones 3 Steps apart Duration: 20 mins 4. Station 1: Range - 10 Stations Coach: Lee Bromley Duration: 30 mins 5. Station 2: Chipping Stations Coach: Mlondi Mlotshwa Duration: 30 mins 6. Station 3: Etiquette Coach: Lee Bromley Duration: 10 mins 7. Cool Down Game: Tiger Woods Duration: 15 mins NOTES:
  • 31. a) Understanding the Session Plan It is important for the coach to understand each section of the Session Plan, in order to execute and review each session; Below, is a section by section description of a session plan; Explanation: Project Name to be filled in on the Session Plan. Date of the Session to be completed. The place or facility where the session takes place. The scheduled times the session will be conducted. The length of the session. The total number of children that attended the session. The age range of the children. The youngest age to the oldest age. The number of sessions held in the year.
  • 32. Explanation: Each session requires Special Items to ensure a safe, healthy and organised session. The following items must be prepared and present at each session; Fruit Juice & Cooler with Ice - Fruit Juice must be mixed with water and ice in the Coleman Cooler for the children’s refreshments. Children must remain hydrated during the session and a short drinks break must be taken after each activity. Plastic Cups – The plastic cups must be cleaned and used for the children’s refreshments. The children must rinse and clean all the cups after each session, in preparation for the next session. First Aid Box – A full and well stocked first aid box must be at each session. The first aid box must be kept tidy at all times. Registration Forms – LBGF Registration Forms must be completed in full by all children, and a copy of their birth certificates attached. It is important that there are blank registration forms availables at every session for any children who have not completed one already. Explanation: The equipment required at each session is self-explanatory and these are required for the safety, games and objectives of each session; Golf Clubs – It is important to have the correctly sized clubs for each child. Range Balls – If the facility or venue does not have golf balls, LBGF must provide these. Soccer Balls. Tennis Balls, Frisbees, Hoola Hoops – For the use in games. Cones – To set up stations and games. Chipping Baskets – To be used at the chipping station. Rope & Pegs – To demarcate the strike zone and safe zones. Tee Pegs – For use at the strike zone. Cleaning Towels – For the children to clean golf clubs. Alignment Sticks – To help with alignment etc Sharks Hands – For use as targets or in games.
  • 33. Explanation: The list of objectives or goals that must be achieved during the session. These objectives or goals do not necessarily have to be completed but must be the focus of the session. The session example above shows that the STEPS must be the focus on the driving range, The Y Setup and Backswing equals Follow through must be the focus at the Chipping Station and the children must learn and remember the etiquette of keeping quiet and remaining still when another player is playing. Explanation: The Stations to be used at every session should be set up before the start of the session. It is important to consider how many children will be at each station and the safety features required for each of the stations. Every station that is set up must be done properly at all times to ensure the safety of the children and that the proper instruction can be issued. Explanation: The Program of events clearly shows what will happen at the session, what order it will happen in, for how long and who will be in charge. Responsibility is clearly defined. It is important that the timings on this section of the Session plan are adhered to at all times.
  • 34. Explanation: At the bottom of the session plan is the “Notes” section where the coach will list any important comments, reminders, remarks, improvements etc. Every session plan and session can be improved upon. Each session must be evaluated and the appropriate evaluation form must be completed. The “Notes” section is ideal for listing reminders for the session evaluation and improvement of the sessions. b) Executing the Session Plan It is very important for a coach to ensure that a session is conducted in a safe and friendly environment, which fulfils all the session objectives. There are a number of key elements to be considered and executed professionally, when executing the session plan. Creating the Right Impression: Allow yourself enough preparation time to ensure everything is set up when the children arrive. Ensue the sessions are started on time and run according to the timings set. Safety: Ensure all areas relating to safety have been addressed. Make sure all the children understand the various safety procedures and where they can walk or can’t walk, swing or can’t swing etc. Starting the Session: The session plan clearly shows what is planned for when and how long it will take. It also shows when each task or activity will commence. Be aware of events that make throw your schedule times out of sync, and be able to react and adjust where necessary. Gathering the Group Together: If you need to stop the session to bring the children together to end the session, to demonstrate, to play a game etc, make sure you: Know what you going to say before you bring the group together. Do not interrupt at a point where the group are all interacting well, or performing well. Rather wait for an appropriate moment. Position yourself so all the children can see and hear you. Have a signal or call that group know and encourage the entire group to stop immediately. Create the Right Impression Safety Starting the Session Gathering the Group Together Returning to Practice Concluding the Session Reviewing the Session
  • 35. Gathering the Group Together continued…. Bring the group together only when you need to make a point that should be seen, heard or carried out by all the children. When talking to a group, always direct your voice to the child farthest away from you an check if they can hear you by asking them a question. Put the group in the best possible position to see you and what you are showing them or demonstrating. It may be best to sit the group down if the explanation is going to be fairly long. It is always a good idea to get the children to put their clubs on the ground (the correct way) before asking them to form a group with or around you. Returning to Practice: When the group has to return to their stations, ensure everyone is back in position before giving the signal to start again. Above all else, keep control of your group through strict but fait commands. Everyone respects a well organised coach. Concluding the Session: Always finish on time! As the session ends with a cool down activity, get some feedback from the children on what they have learnt, or how much they enjoyed the session. Try to get everyone involved in tidying up the equipment and area. Use lots of encouragement and praise when talking and ensure the group know when and where to meet for the next session. The conclusion of the session signals the start of the evaluation for the coach as to how well the panning was and how well the session was executed. Reviewing the Session: The reviewing or evaluation of one session forms the planning basis for the next session. The key elements in your evaluation should be: When reviewing the performance of a child, your assessment will be based upon the following; Their ability to complete the activity. The form or technique with which they achieved it. Their preferred way of learning that skill. Socially, are they happy in the Group environment? Do you need to involve them more in group activities? What would be the best way forward with this child? Was the Session Safe? Did everyone enjoy the Session? What went well in the Session? Could anything have been done better? How would you change the Session next time?
  • 36. Reviewing the Session cont…. You should also be asking yourself how well you performed as a coach. Use some of the questions below, to establish where you are, in terms of your level as a coach; 1. Did you have all the right equipment, in the right place and available to each child as they arrived for the Session? 2. Was there enough space or the children to work safely and efficiently? 3. Where you aware of every child’s ability level? 4. Where you able to coach them at their level? 5. Did you make all the children aware of the rules and standard of behaviour expected from them? 6. How well prepared were the children, through warm activities etc? 7. Did your demonstrations and explanations show clarity and were they relevant to the children? 8. How did you check for understanding with each child? 9. Were the children able to practice and move around in a safe, supervised environment? 10. How did you manage children that lacked motivation or found the skill too difficult to complete? 11. Did you allow feedback from the children or did you tell them everything without listening? 12. Were you happy with your behaviour towards the children? 13. Were you respectful and sympathetic? 14. Was your time equally divided amongst all the children? 15. Was best practice observed by allowing the children to practice safely, encouraging performance and allowing feedback and making use of the time and facilities? 16. Were the goals for the players and for the session met? Always highlight areas of strength and improvement, as well as areas of weakness that need to be addressed and improved on. As a coach, always look for ways to improve the accuracy of your demonstrations, or position yourself in a more effective position so you be more easily seen by all of the children. Small improvements in yourself and the session will ensure that you, as a coach, will grown in strength and deliver the most effective, fun and safe sessions for the children.
  • 37. SAMPLE EVALUATION FORM: LBGF PROJECT NAME: .............................................................................................................................. HEAD COACH: …………………………………………………….. DATE OF SESSION:…………………………………………….. MENTOR: …………………………………………………………… ASSISTANT COACH:………………………………………….. NUMBER OF CHILDREN: …………………………………….. AGE RANGE:……………………………………………………. OBJECTIVES OF SESSION: 1………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Planning: 1. Did everything go according to plan? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 2. Was all the right equipment available and clean? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 3. Did everyone know what they were supposed to be doing? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... Delivery: 1. Was the demonstration and explanation accurate? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 2. Could all the children see the coach’s demonstrations? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 3. Was the Session safe and enjoyable? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 4. What performance improvement was noticed? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………......
  • 38. EVALUATION 1. Were the areas needing improvement from the last session improved? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 2. How has the session improved from the last Session? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 3. What went well in this Session? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 4. What could have been better in this Session? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 5. How are you going to make it better for the next Session? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... KEY ACTION POINTS: 1.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 2.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... 3.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...... Date: ……………………...................…………… Signed Head Coach:………………………………….………... Name (Printed):…………………………………………………..
  • 39. c) Session Rules and Requirements It is the Coach’s responsibility to ensure all sessions are conducted in the appropriate manner with all the rules and requirements of each session fulfilled. LBGF has very high coaching standards and being a LBGF coach is a privilege which should be treated as such. LBGF has implemented some rules and requirements which must be completed at each and every session conducted under the LBGF Banner. These are: LBGF SESSION RULES & REQUIREMENTS All coaches must be at the session venue at least 20 minutes before the scheduled start time of the session. A session briefing is conducted with all coaches prior to the commencement of the session. All equipment is checked before the session commences. Ensure all children register with the coach responsible for the attendance register. Any children who have not completed a Registration Form in full and/or have not handed in a copy of their Birth Certificate must be reminded to do so, as a matter of urgency. All golf clubs and equipment must be cleaned and returned to their correct bags at the completion of each activity. This must be done by the children! All sessions must have all the necessary safety features and areas, such as; Safe Zone and Strike Zone. The Session Plan is followed completely and the coaches must be very aware of the timings of each activity. The LBGF “STEPS” cannot be changed or modified by any coach for any reason whatsoever. The Steps must be followed in sequence and in full. There are no shortcuts, additions or modifications needed. Every session must be fun and enjoyable for the children. Children should not stand around, doing nothing and getting bored. It is important that coaches allow the children to have a drink after each activity at each session. Rehydration is key to productivity and well-being. All the golf balls must be cleaned and counted after each session. This goes for all the equipment. It must be cleaned, accounted for and put back in the same bag, in the same manner as it was originally found. The equipment is tools of the trade and without this equipment, the coaches will not have the ability to coach! Equipment, such as the cooler and plastic cups are also included. These must be rinsed, cleaned and dried after every session. Be Proud to be a LBGF Coach and be Proud of the LBGF Session.
  • 40. LBGF has strict policies and reporting procedures to ensure the sustainability of the program and the maintenance of the high standards set. It is the duty of every LBGF coach to become familiar with the LBGF policies and reporting procedures. a) Attendance Registers Every LBGF Project must maintain the Attendance Register in “real time” and this register must be completed and maintained in full. b) Session Plans and Evaluations All session plans must be adhered to in their entirety and must be used in numerical order. Evaluation forms are completed after every session by the coach in charge. c) Weekly Reporting to Head Office It is the responsibility of the Head Coach at each LBGF Project to keep head office updated on the progress of the project. Head Office have to compile reports for supporters, partners, authorities etc and it is vital that updates are constantly received in a timely manner. Each project will be required to ensure that the following reports are submitted to head office every week, by the latest, Monday morning; 1. Completed Session Plans 2. Session Evaluation Forms 3. Attendance Registers 4. Completed Registration Forms and Birth Certificate Copies 5. Scorecards and scores of any rounds played d) Monthly Reporting to Head Office Regardless of the weekly reports submitted, the following compiled monthly reports must be submitted to Head Office by the last day of each month; 1. Monthly Evaluation Report 2. Attendance Registers 3. Equipment and Asset Reconciliation 4. Authorised Expenses and Receipts e) Equipment and Asset Reconciliation Reports The equipment and resources used for the successful staging of each session is highly important to the success of the project. It is therefore, vital that each project takes good care of its equipment and assets. This equipment and assets belong to LBGF at all times and no coach is entitled to sell, swop, trade or dispose of any equipment or assets, whatsoever. The Equipment and Asset Reconciliation Report is a stock reconciliation system whereby each project will be required to conduct a full count of all equipment and assets on a monthly basis and complete the reconciliation report. This must be submitted to head office, together with the regular monthly reports. 13. LBGF Policies and Reporting
  • 41. All LBGF coaches will be required to complete the accreditation and certification process before they are able to coach each level of the LBGF program. The LBGF coaching levels are: Each level is obviously more advanced with the coach requiring more knowledge in terms of player development, including Long Term Athlete Development. Every coach will be required to start as Level 1 and pass a written and practical certification process to progress to the next level. Each LBGF project will be required to implement the following coaching structure; 14. LBGF Coaching Development Program Level 1 Coach Level 2 Coach Level 3 Coach Academy Coach Elite Coach 15. LBGF Coaching Structure Head Coach Assistant Coach Apprentice Mentor
  • 42. To enrich the lives of disadvantaged children through the great game of golf is a very humbling and rewarding experience. The opportunity to make a positive impact on so many children is an honour and a privilege. Being a LBGF Coach is all about the children and creating a solid platform for them to excel in life. As a LBGF coach it is important to get to a stage where the children not only see you as coach but as a lifelong mentor. Coaching the children is very important and you will have a impact on the children which will last a lifetime. WHAT MAKES A GREAT (LBGF) GOLF COACH 15. Being a LBGF Coach