What is an OTJ? <ul><li>An OTJ is a judgment made for the purpose of reporting in relation to the National Standards </li>...
What information to use  <ul><li>An OTJ should draw on a range of evidence </li></ul><ul><li>An OTJ should be made with a ...
Reporting to parents  <ul><li>Standards are written for ‘end of year’ </li></ul><ul><li>But need to report to parents in w...
Why moderate OTJs <ul><li>To get a shared understanding of:  </li></ul><ul><li>what students should be able to do at each ...
NAG 2 <ul><li>report to students and their parents on the student’s progress and achievement  in relation to National Stan...
Principles for reporting to students and parents <ul><li>Involves students </li></ul><ul><li>Supports learners and their n...
Through reports parents should understand <ul><li>What their child can do and how they have progressed </li></ul><ul><li>T...
Content of parents’ reports <ul><li>Ask community what they want in and from reports </li></ul><ul><li>Should start with w...
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OTJs and Reporting: Guidelines from the MoE

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This slideshow explains the Ministry of Education's guidelines and expectations around overall teacher judgements and reporting against the National Standards.

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  • The National Standards are designed as a tool to inform teaching and learning so that the next steps for each child are clearly identified. The aim is to identify what the child needs to learn next and what support they need to ensure they make progress. An OTJ is not an assessment task - there is no National Standards test An OTJ is only one of many judgments teachers make about student achievement It can be used both summatively (summarises information from a certain time period) and formatively (used to inform teaching and learning strategies)
  • Use as much evidence as you need to understand where a student is at, their progress, and what needs to happen next After quality information, not just quantity Use assessment tool alignment information on TKI to help guide judgements Shouldn’t need new tests / tools. Use what already exists
  • A suggested moderation process Teachers meet – each teacher brings three to four samples of student work or other evidence that they believe shows a child is meeting a particular standard. To start, each teacher makes independent judgments using the samples and shared criteria. (Have the curriculum, the National Standards and the literacy and numeracy progressions available as resources.) Then the group discusses and compares their results. The group discusses the degree to which they have a shared understanding of the National Standards, how consistent their judgments are and what further actions they may need to take. Some critical questions may be asked at moderation meetings or following them: 1. What should these children’s next learning steps be, and what does that mean for my teaching? 2. Which children do we need to consider as a whole staff or syndicate? Where the moderation process sits The National Standards describe a nationally consistent benchmark in words. The illustrations in the standards provide more concrete reference points for teacher judgments. Assessment tools that are linked to the standards provide an external reference point for teacher judgments. Moderation processes enhance teachers’ understanding of what quality and progress means in relation to the standards, and the consistency of teacher judgments.  Related weblink Further information for teachers on using the moderation process is on TKI: http://assessment.tki.org.nz/Effective-use-of-evidence/Moderation Material for teachers from script scrutiny will also appear in the effective use of evidence section. 
  • (NB in writing can be electronic)
  • These apply to all reporting, not just for National Standards
  • Schools are encouraged to find the most appropriate way to report a student’s progress and achievement in relation to national standards. Reporting to parents should enable them to understand what their child can do and how they have progressed, and their child’s progress and achievement in relation to the expected standard. Exactly how teachers frame this is for their professional judgment. There is no requirement to use the words above, at, below, or well below.
  • Schools should look ahead to reporting to boards when adjusting their parent reports.
  • OTJs and Reporting: Guidelines from the MoE

    1. 1. What is an OTJ? <ul><li>An OTJ is a judgment made for the purpose of reporting in relation to the National Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers make a series of judgments to inform teaching and learning. They will use these to make OTJ’s </li></ul>
    2. 2. What information to use <ul><li>An OTJ should draw on a range of evidence </li></ul><ul><li>An OTJ should be made with a student </li></ul><ul><li>Could use: </li></ul><ul><li>Student’s work, and peer and self assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Everyday classroom observations and interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment tool information </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrations of standards, progressions and other NZC resources </li></ul>
    3. 3. Reporting to parents <ul><li>Standards are written for ‘end of year’ </li></ul><ul><li>But need to report to parents in writing twice a year </li></ul><ul><li>The first report should be in relation to expected progress and achievement towards the end of year target </li></ul>
    4. 4. Why moderate OTJs <ul><li>To get a shared understanding of: </li></ul><ul><li>what students should be able to do at each standard </li></ul><ul><li>what student work should look like at each standard </li></ul><ul><li>how students should be progressing towards each standard </li></ul><ul><li>how formal assessment tools relate to the standards </li></ul><ul><li>To get consistency of OTJs, through using: </li></ul><ul><li>The supporting evidence for teacher judgments </li></ul><ul><li>Planned discussions with other teachers </li></ul>
    5. 5. NAG 2 <ul><li>report to students and their parents on the student’s progress and achievement in relation to National Standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting to parents in plain language in writing must be at least twice a year; </li></ul>
    6. 6. Principles for reporting to students and parents <ul><li>Involves students </li></ul><ul><li>Supports learners and their next steps </li></ul><ul><li>Language clear and easily understood </li></ul><ul><li>Honest and transparent </li></ul><ul><li>No surprises </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthens partnerships between school, students and whānau </li></ul>
    7. 7. Through reports parents should understand <ul><li>What their child can do and how they have progressed </li></ul><ul><li>Their child’s progress and achievement in relation to the standard for their year level </li></ul><ul><li>Their child’s goals </li></ul><ul><li>How they can help </li></ul>
    8. 8. Content of parents’ reports <ul><li>Ask community what they want in and from reports </li></ul><ul><li>Should start with what the student has learned and can do </li></ul><ul><li>Could report in relation to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The standard the student meets (ie best fit) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The year level standard (above, at below well below or a scale the school is currently using) </li></ul></ul>

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