Crossing the digital divide

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Educational technology leaders view the so-called “digital divide” as nonexistent and urge schools to integrate technology across the curriculum. Two technology advocates share six professional lessons for successfully integrating technology into schools using resources at hand.

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Crossing the digital divide

  1. 1. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Title Body Crossing the digital divide
  2. 2. This presentation is a supplement to the full article. Download more information, resources, and tools to help you implement these ideas in Tools for Learning School (Summer, 2013). Available at www.learningforward. org/publications/tools-for-learning- schools. Download the article and accompanying tools
  3. 3. Survey of youth ages 12-17 and their parents Source: Madden, M., Lenhart, A., Duggan, M., Cortesi, S., Gasser, U. (2013, March). Teens and technology 2013. Available at www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/ Teens-and-Tech.aspx. • 78% of youth now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of them own smartphones. That translates into 37% of all youth who have smartphones. • 23% of youth have a tablet computer. • 95% of youth use the Internet. • 93% of youth have a computer or have access to one at home.
  4. 4. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Building leaders model learning for other adults in the school. Keep the vision focused on students and the effect on their learning. Begin with adult relationships
  5. 5. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Look for those who have • interest, • willingness to learn, and • motivation. Make use of the trailblazers
  6. 6. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Teachers need to know not just how to use the technologies available, but how to determine which technology supports the lesson objective. Think of technology only after a clear objective for the lesson has been identified. Focus on the lesson, not the technology
  7. 7. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Students may help teachers understand what tools can support the lesson and help teachers envision a new landscape for learning. The teacher’s role as facilitators of learning is to show students how to be creators, how to learn, and how to use personal learning networks. Recognize that everyone is a learner
  8. 8. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Experiment with making use of what you have and what students own and can bring to class. Use what you have
  9. 9. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Summer). Crossing the Digital Divide. ToolsforLearning Schools8(4). (p.p. 1-3). Teachers realize the power of social networking, so district policy needs to follow. Support edcuators connecting with others in the same job across counties, states, and more Find a personal learning network
  10. 10. Learn more with Learn more about professional learning at all levels of education with Learning Forward, an international nonprofit association of learning educators: www.learningforward.org Membership in Learning Forward gives you access to a wide range of publications, tools, and opportunities to advance professional learning for student success.

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