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Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions
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Students talk back: Opportunities for growth lie in student perceptions

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Some states and districts are finding new ways to ask, what do students know about their teachers? Research shows that students’ perceptions of teachers are highly correlated to student performance on …

Some states and districts are finding new ways to ask, what do students know about their teachers? Research shows that students’ perceptions of teachers are highly correlated to student performance on standardized tests. Read several tips that help teachers capture and use student input to improve practice.

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  • 1. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5Title•  BodyStudents talk back:Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions
  • 2. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5•  Student surveys are one of multiple measuresof teacher effectiveness.•  Students can identify what teachers do well.•  Students’perceptions of teachers correlate tostudent performance.Student perceptions
  • 3. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5•  Measured learning?•  Self-directed learning?•  Balance engaging with challenging.Define the desired outcome
  • 4. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5•  One or two open-ended questions per week.“What is working well in our class?”“What things do you think I could do better?”•  Ask students to formulate next questions.•  Follow up with students through discussion.Ask the students
  • 5. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5•  Results should guide teacher practices.•  Reactions depend on teacher’s personalityand skill level.•  Leaders can guide how the feedback is used.•  Ensure there are no repercussions forstudents.•  Make counseling services available for whenresults are different from self-perception.Prepare for the results
  • 6. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5•  Recognize connection between actions andstudent results.•  Use feedback to fine-tune practices.•  Use feedback in a collective learningexperience within learning teams.•  Create norms and values for how the feedbackwill contribute to teacher learning.Use the information
  • 7. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5•  Student input can raise awareness of goals. •  Posing questions about classroom practicecan improve perception and preparation ofpractice.A higher awareness
  • 8. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). Students talk back: Opportunities for growth liein student perceptions. The Leading Teacher. 8(2). 1, 4-5Read the full article, with moreinformation, resources, and tools tohelp you implement these ideas inThe Leading Teacher (Winter, 2013).Available at www.learningforward.org/publications/leading-teacher.Download the article andaccompanying toolsEVERY EDUCATOR ENGAGES IN EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING EVERY DAY SO EVERY STUDENT ACHIEVESInside• Coaches recognize learning is change, p. 2• Little by little, classroom doors become revolvingdoors, p. 3• Build student feedback on trust and respect, pp. 6-7Winter 2013Vol. 8, No. 2THE LEADINGTeacherYour membership in Learning Forward gives you access to a wide rangeof publications, tools, and opportunities to advance professional learning forstudent success. Visit www.learningforward.org to explore more of yourmembership benefits.By Valerie von FrankSome states and districts now are finding new waysto ask, what do students know? Not just aboutreading, writing, and arithmetic, but what do stu-dents know about their teachers? Who are goodteachers, and in what ways?States and districts revamping their formal teacherevaluation systems in some cases are using student surveysas one of multiple measures of teacher effectiveness (Burni-ske & Meibaum, 2012). They generally use standardizedstudent surveys, such as the Questionnaire on Teacher Inter-action, the Pupil Observation Survey, the Student Evalua-tion of Teaching, or Ronald Ferguson’s student perceptionsurvey for the Measures of Effective Teaching project of theBill & Melinda Gates Foundation (MET, 2010).Good teaching can be defined by common traits, ac-cording to Ferguson, senior lecturer in education and publicpolicy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, whocategorizes these common traits into “seven C’s” (see box onp. 4).“Researchers over many decades have suggested thatstudents will engage more deeply and master their lessonsmore thoroughly when their teachers care about them,control the classroom well, clarify complex ideas, challengethem to work hard and think hard, deliver lessons in waysthat captivate, confer with them about their ideas and con-solidate lessons to make learning coherent,” Ferguson haswritten (2010, p. 7). Other research also concludes that stu-dents — who naturally spend hundreds of hours with theirteachers — are capable from the early grades of identifyingwhat teachers do well, and what they don’t (Murphy, Delli& Edwards, 2004).Students’ perceptions of teachers are highly correlatedto student performance on standardized tests — when stu-dents find teachers effective, achievement gains as measuredon the exam are greater for all the students of that teacher(MET, 2010). Research finds students from different classesshare similar responses to the same teacher, according toStudentstalk backOPPORTUNITIES FOR GROWTHLIE IN STUDENT PERCEPTIONSContinued on p. 4
  • 9. Learn more withLearn more about professional learning at alllevels of education with Learning Forward, aninternational nonprofit association of learningeducators:www.learningforward.orgMembership in Learning Forward gives youaccess to a wide range of publications, tools,and opportunities to advance professionallearning for student success.

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