Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles for reviving problematic groups
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Discover five key principles, based on the assumption that behavior change leads to attitude change, that helped a principal move a group of teachers from argumentation to collaboration that improved ...

Discover five key principles, based on the assumption that behavior change leads to attitude change, that helped a principal move a group of teachers from argumentation to collaboration that improved teaching and learning.

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Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles for reviving problematic groups Presentation Transcript

  • 1. TitleBody5 principles for revivingproblematic groupsSource: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 2. Unproductive andcontentious meetings?Team-building activities=Changing attitudes before changing behaviorsBehavior change, though, can lead toattitude change.Source: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 3. 1) Find a shared concernFind persistent student achievement challengesthat a majority recognizes and shares.• Shared student needs can temporarily suspend old antagonisms.• Principals must create and prioritize time for the team to directly focus on identifying and addressing common student instructional needs.Source: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 4. 2) Establish teacher ownershipTeachers must set and share the student-needgoals themselves as they review availablesources of evidence.• Others may suggest several key areas of need to choose from, but the goal chosen has to be one most teachers see as immediately relevant to their own classrooms.• Principals must keep at the forefront a team’s commitment to work together to develop instruction once a shared problem is identified.Source: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 5. 3) Get a commitment to meeting guidelinesEmpower teachers to hold colleaguesaccountable.• Principals must help teams establish, publish, and distribute their guidelines.• Review guidelines at strategic intervals by reflecting on meeting effectiveness.Source: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 6. 4) Expect productive actionConsistently engage in productive action.• Strive to collectively accomplish things that have a direct and positive impact on member teaching.• Principals must mentor the team leader to plan agendas and focus on the cycle of improvement.• Principals must monitor their own behavior so as to not raise other administrative topics or issues that might distract the team from their agenda and work.Source: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 7. 5) Strategize according to teams and individualsOne-on-one attention may be necessary, even ifall groups are struggling to work productively.• Keep the majority of teams moving forward through commitments to guidelines and establishing a framework and routine for successful action.• Principals can work directly with individual teams or team members where extra strategic attention is needed.Source: Ermeling, B.A. (2012). Breathe new life into collaboration: 5 principles forreviving problematic groups. The Learning Principal. 8(1), pp.1, 4-5.
  • 8. Download the article andaccompanying toolsRead the full article, published in ThE lEarNING Principal Inside • It’s time to take a Galilean approach to analyzing our data, p. 2 • For principals’ professional learning, overlap and modeling count, p. 3 • Tool: Principal reflection chart for reviving problematic groups, p. 6 • Tool: Gap analysis, p. 7 Fall 2012 Vol. 8, No. 1 EVEry EducaTor ENGaGEs IN EFFEcTIVE ProFEssIoNal lEarNING EVEry day so EVEry sTudENT achIEVEsThe Learning Principal (Fall, 2012). By Bradley A. Ermeling Breathe new life into collaBoration 5 principles for reviving problematic groups Tand download these tools: he principal of a large urban middle school a critical choice point. Some might have suggested team- in the Midwest asked for my guidance as a building activities to exorcise the hostile social dynamics researcher and advisor to help make their standing in the way of effective collaboration time — an ap- teams’ collaboration times more productive. proach that assumes attitudes must change before behavior The principal especially needed help with one changes. I assumed the opposite: behavior change is fol- teacher team whose meet- lowed by attitude change. ings were suffocating from I asked, “Can we all tension and hostility. agree to suspend those be- When teachers on the haviors that are disrupting team were asked to de- productive work?” Heads scribe what happened dur- nodded, so I continued, ing collaboration times, “Then let’s get started by many responses included developing an agenda.” such confrontational We started searching behaviors as shouting, for a common studentPrincipal reflection chart for poor listening, hostility, need, a pressing concern negativity, arguing about that the group thought unimportant topics, and essential to meet for them reading uninformative to be successful. Turn- books. ing away from the highly When I met with abstract, philosophical the team, I made two observations: “One, you don’t like questions that had led to so much conflict was what this unproductive and contentious meetings, and, two, you group needed, not team building activities. would like to have meetings that are productive and focused Behavior change preceding attitude and belief changes on improving teaching and learning. Does anyone disagree is a staple narrative in literature, popular media, and with that?” personal anecdotes. Popular sports-themed movies often The room was quiet. Their silent agreement defined Continued on p. 4reviving problematic groups Your membership in Learning Forward gives you access to a wide range of publications, tools, and opportunities to advance professional learning for student success. Visit www.learningforward.org to explore more of your membership benefits.andGap analysisAvailable atwww.learningforward.org.
  • 9. Learn more withLearn more about professional learning at alllevels of education with Learning Forward, aninternational nonprofit association of learningeducators:www.learningforward.orgMembership in Learning Forward gives youaccess to a wide range of publications, tools,and opportunities to advance professionallearning for student success.