Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth...
Learn more withLearn more about professional learning at alllevels of education with Learning Forward, aninternational non...
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The power of observation: 5 ways to ensure teacher evaluations lead to teacher growth

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The teacher’s ability to assess student learning, analyze outcomes, and adapt instruction to meet student needs may not always show up on a state standardized exam. However, principals who pay attention to a range of measures of teacher effectiveness can provide more meaningful teacher evaluations that promote teacher growth. Discover several areas in which principals can concentrate to ensure growth-oriented evaluations.

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The power of observation: 5 ways to ensure teacher evaluations lead to teacher growth

  1. 1. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.TitleBodyThe power ofobservation:5 ways to ensure teacherevaluations lead toteacher growth
  2. 2. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.Principals who pay attention to differentmeasures of teacher effectiveness and honetheir abilities to be effective, objective observersprovide more meaningful teacher evaluationsthat promote teacher growth.
  3. 3. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.• Review the district’s evaluation rubric early todevelop a shared understanding of how thedistrict is defining good teaching.• Discuss with staff where to focus.• Talk about what each element of the rubricwould look like in practice.Unpack the rubric
  4. 4. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.• Broaden the definition of student results.• Student surveys• Student learning data• Observations• What else?Move beyond test scores
  5. 5. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.• Teachers in some states provide their ownevidence of student results.• Have teachers think about how they’remaking progress and what data do not showup in tests.Have teachers provide data
  6. 6. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.• Announced observations create unnaturalsituations.• “You’re not scoring the teacher…You’reforming an impression.”• Follow each visit with an informal, briefconversation.• Get a cross-section of information aboutinstruction throughout the school to developwhole-faculty professional learning.See daily practice, daily
  7. 7. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.• Notice what’s important.• Know what to expect.• Co-observe to develop skills.• Take literal notes.• Avoid technology.• Invest in professional learning.Develop observation skills
  8. 8. Source: von Frank, V. (2013, Winter). The power of observation: 5 ways to ensureteacher evaluations lead to teacher growth. The Learning Principal. 8(2), pp.1, 4-5.Read the full article, with moreinformation, resources, and toolsto help you implement these ideasin The Learning Principal (Winter,2013).Available at www.learningforward.org/publications/learning-principal.Download the article andaccompanying toolsInside• Real change requires a focus on implementation, p. 2• Teacher leader voice and capacity building lead to student growth, p. 3• Tool: Preobservation map, p. 6• Tool: Questions to help evaluate the quality of student learning, p. 7Winter 2013Vol. 8, No. 2EVERy EducaToR ENgagEs iN EffEcTiVE PRofEssioNal lEaRNiNg EVERy day so EVERy sTudENT achiEVEsContinued on p. 4PrincipalThE lEaRNiNgBy Valerie von FrankAteacher and principalwere meeting after theprincipal had conduct-ed a post-observationconversation as part ofthe teacher’s evaluation. As the twolooked over the freshman algebra stu-dents’ assignments quizzes, the teacherwas distressed to find that at least halfthe students didn’t know that a nega-tive number multiplied by anothernegative resulted in a positive.“This is horrible,” she said. “Ikeep going over this fact, but the kidsjust can’t remember.”As the two continued theirdiscussion, the principal asked theteacher about next steps.“After school today, I’m going togo poll my colleagues on how they’ve taught this concept,”the teacher said. “I don’t want to wait for our next learningteam meeting. I’d love to observe a successful lesson, but Iwant to try to re-teach this concept and reassess the studentsnext week.”The principal made a note to check back the next week.When he followed up in a brief visit to the classroom,he found that students overwhelmingly had rememberedthe rule on the quiz — and they were able to explain to himwhy the rule worked.That kind of progress in a teacher’s instruction issignificant, said Jon Saphier, founder of Research for BetterTeaching, who related this fictional example. The teacher’sability to assess student learning, analyze outcomes, andadapt instruction to meet student needs may not alwaysYour membership in Learning Forward gives you access to a wide rangeof publications, tools, and opportunities to advance professional learning forstudent success. Visit www.learningforward.org to explore more of yourmembership benefits.The power of observaTion5 ways to ensure teacher evaluationslead to teacher growth
  9. 9. Learn more withLearn more about professional learning at alllevels of education with Learning Forward, aninternational nonprofit association of learningeducators:www.learningforward.orgMembership in Learning Forward gives youaccess to a wide range of publications, tools,and opportunities to advance professionallearning for student success.

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