• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this document? Why not share!

Active citizenship article

on

  • 517 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
517
Views on SlideShare
517
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Active citizenship article Active citizenship article Document Transcript

    •   ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP   Andrej Fištravec, ZRSŠ    Talking  about  »active  citizenship«  in  Europe  has  become  frequent  and  important  because more  and  more  European  citizens  do  not  care  about  elections.  It  is  becoming  quite  »normal«  that such »non‐voters« are in majority. This means we have a majority which does not want to participate in  the  management  of  common  affairs,  and  consequently  that  choices  of  a  minority  become obligations of a majority. It also means that European citizens (trends of behaviour in different age groups are very similar) with their actions question the entire concept of legitimate government, as founded  by  the  bourgeois  revolutions  from  the  18th  century  onwards.  Since  every  government  is  a system of violence over people – citizens, it is important that citizens agree with a government. We can express our agreement by participating in »politics« ‐ by managing common affairs, through the forms of direct participation in »politics« by elections (as voters or as politicians), as well as in a wider sense of the word through various forms of activities within a civil society.     Various  European  and  national  institutions  try  through  various  programmes  to  encourage citizens  to  develop  more  active  approach  to  politics.  The  problem  is,  however,  that  increasingly powerful  parallel  (real?)  centres  of  social  power  (i.e.  global  capital)  for  their  functioning  do  not require active citizens, since the latter (as well as a politics which is concerned with common good) represents disturbance for the functioning of global capital. The interests of capital has often little to do with the interests of individual citizens, groups of citizens or a public politics which endeavours to promote  our  common  interests  (the  interests  of  profit,  for  example,  comes  before  the  interests  of health or knowledge or truth).   Despite the waning interest in politics in a narrower sense, the interest in politics in a wider sense  has  become  keener.  Citizens  are  willing  to  participate  in  settling  of  common  affairs,  yet without  being  cheated  in  the  process.  Different  public  polls  show  that  this  kind  of  willingness  to participate in politics in a wider sense is approximately 50 to 100 % higher than actual participation in political processes in a narrower sense. The potential for participating in politics in a wider sense is presented in the table below. Table: Participation in some voluntary organisations in Europe (sums of members and active members)   The share of  The smallest  The biggest Type of organisation  Slovenia and  share of a  share of a  other countries  country (in %)  country (in %)  (in %)  1  
    •   Sports clubs, societies or societies for  0–9:  20–29:  70–79: outdoor activities (hunters, scouts)  GR, PL  SI, ES, IL  NL Cultural societies or groups, amateur  0–9:  10–19:  40–49: groups  GR, PL, PT  SI, ES, HU, IT  BE, DK, SE Religious or church organisations  0–9 :  10–19:  40–49:  GR, IL, IT, PL  SI, BE, ES, FR, HU, AT  PT Social or youth clubs, pensioners’  0–9:  10–19:  30–39: societies, women’s societies, friends’  GR, IT, PL, PT  SI,  ES,  FI,  FR,  HU, BE, NO, SE societies  IL, NL  Source:  Malnar,  B.  (2004):  the  European  Social  Survey  2002:  the  final  report.  Ljubljana:  Faculty  of  Social Sciences, Institute of Social Sciences, Public Opinion and Mass Communication Research Centre. p.: 25‐28. Legend:  AT‐Austria,  BE‐Belgium,  CH‐Switzerland,  CZ‐the  Czech  Republic,  DE‐Germany,  DK‐Denmark,  ES‐Spain, FI‐Finland,  FR‐France,  GB‐Great  Britain,  HU‐Hungary,  IE‐Ireland,  IL‐Israel,  IT‐Italy,  LU‐Luxemburg,  NL‐the Netherlands, NO‐Norway, PL‐Poland, PT‐Portugal, SE‐Sweden, SI‐Slovenia.    2