NO MORE DOWNTOWNS? 
WHAT DOES IT MEAN WHEN
WE WORK “ANYWHERE”?
LAURA CRESCIMANO
www.sitelaburbanstudio.com
@lcrescimano
HOW WE WORK
TRADITIONAL TODAY
FOCUS
FOCUS
MEET
MEET
MEET
SOCIALIZE
SOCIALIZE
SOCIALIZE
SOCIALIZE
HUDDLE HUDDLE
HUDDLE
HUDD...
WHERE WE WORK
URBAN VS SUBURBAN
18 SPUR Report > January 2012
The Urban Future of WorkFigure 3: Bay Area Employment Densit...
WHERE WE WORK
BUSINESS VS ‘SOCIAL’ DISTRICTS
WHERE WE WORK
BUSINESS VS ‘SOCIAL’ DISTRICTS
NEW HEADQUARTERS
FACEBOOK
ownership				experience
hierarchy					diversity
privacy						community
NEW HEADQUARTERS
FACEBOOK
“For example, if 95% of an
agency’s employees work at home
or another location 3 days a week,
the agency can achieve a 30%...
2013
“ALL HANDS ON DECK”
HP CALLS FOR WORKERS TO RETURN TO OFFICE.
2006-2011
“WORKFORCE TRANSFORMATION PROGRAM”
TO REDUCE ...
mobility	 vs.	 all on site
economy
efficiency
choice
collaboration
culture
control
COMPARING TRENDS
TRADITIONAL DRIVERS
su...
experience over space
choice over ownership
variety over singularity
COMPARING TRENDS
COMMONALITIES
mobility	 vs.	 all on ...
THIRD WAY
FINDING PHYSICAL AND
VIRTUAL WORK COMMUNITIES
FOR A DISTRIBUTED TEAM
©SITELAB
THIRD WAY
WEWORK
WeWork | Golden Gate San Francisco, CA
WORK SPACES THAT CONNECT
MULTIPLE ORGANIZATIONS
©WeWork
WEWORK
WeWork | Boston, MAWORK SPACES THAT
FEEL LIKE HOME SPACES
©WeWork
WEWORK
WeWork | Chinatown Washington, DCWORK SPACES THAT
FEEL LIKE HOME SPACES
©WeWork
WHAT HAPPENS TO DOWNTOWN?
“WORKPLACE AS A SERVICE”
WHAT HAPPENS TO DOWNTOWN?
PLANNING FOR NEW TRANSIT PATTERNS
WHAT HAPPENS TO
DOWNTOWN?
ADAPTING BUILDINGS TO
OTHER USES
FOCUS
MEET
MEET
SOCIALIZE
HUDDLE
HUDDLE
NO MORE DOWNTOWNS? 
WHAT DOES IT MEAN WHEN
WE WORK “ANYWHERE”?
LAURA CRESCIMANO
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No More Downtowns? What Does It Mean When We Work “Anywhere”?

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Laura Crescimano @lcrescimano SITELAB URBAN STUDIO

By nearly all measurements, remote work is growing rapidly. At the same time, leading companies are building new headquarters to bring their workers together. What do the trends of “work anywhere” and “everyone work here” have in common? And what are the implications for the places we work and live in? Urban designer Laura Crescimano will look at the trends for and questions raised by an increasingly distributed workforce.

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No More Downtowns? What Does It Mean When We Work “Anywhere”?

  1. NO MORE DOWNTOWNS?  WHAT DOES IT MEAN WHEN WE WORK “ANYWHERE”? LAURA CRESCIMANO www.sitelaburbanstudio.com @lcrescimano
  2. HOW WE WORK TRADITIONAL TODAY FOCUS FOCUS MEET MEET MEET SOCIALIZE SOCIALIZE SOCIALIZE SOCIALIZE HUDDLE HUDDLE HUDDLE HUDDLE
  3. WHERE WE WORK URBAN VS SUBURBAN 18 SPUR Report > January 2012 The Urban Future of WorkFigure 3: Bay Area Employment Density Miles 0 2 4 6 8 10 Limited Access Highways Regional Rail (BART, Caltrain) San Jose Palo Alto Concord Oakland Fremont Pleasanton San Francisco Redwood City Mountain View Walnut Creek Almost all jobs in the Bay Area are within 3 miles of regional rail, but less than a quarter are walking distance from rail stations. Planning efforts should concentrate more jobs within a half-mile of rail stops (red circles) as well as providing links between transit and jobs in dense settings that are just a few miles away (blue areas). Source:DunnandBradstreet,AssociationofBayArea 18 SPUR Report > January 2012 The Urban Future of WorkFigure 3: Bay Area Employment Density Miles 0 2 4 6 8 10 Limited Access Highways Regional Rail (BART, Caltrain) San Jose Palo Alto Concord Oakland Fremont Pleasanton San Francisco Redwood City Mountain View Walnut Creek Almost all jobs in the Bay Area are within 3 miles of regional rail, but less than a quarter are walking distance from rail stations. Planning efforts should concentrate more jobs within a half-mile of rail stops (red circles) as well as providing links between transit and jobs in dense settings that are just a few miles away (blue areas). Source:DunnandBradstreet,AssociationofBayArea Governments(ABAG).DatacourtesyofMichaelReilly. Bay Area Employment Distribution Jobs per acre within 1/2 mile from regional transit 1 to 5 6 to 25 26 to 100 101 and above Detail of South Bay and San Jose Jobs per acre more than 1/2 mile from regional transit 1 to 5 6 to 25 26 to 100 101 and above Despite the historic urban form of the South Bay, where Caltrain stations connect existing walkable downtowns, most of the Silicon Valley’s highest employment densities (other than downtown Palo Alto) are not in these station areas. In many cases, the half- mile ring around these stations includes areas with fewer than 5 jobs per acre. Further, most planning policy has focused on putting additional housing, not jobs, in these station areas. The station areas with the higher densities tend to be contiguous with other employment areas, such as Santa Clara Station and Sunnyvale‘s Lawrence Station. At the same time, the high-density employment areas in Silicon Valley are located in a relatively contained areas – such as around Stanford University and Research Park, around Google in Mountain View, and throughout North San Jose. The Urban Future of Work Miles 0 1 2 3 4 5 Downtown San Jose Santa Clara Milpitas Stanford Palo Alto Menlo Park Mountain View Google Campus Cupertino Sunnyvale Fremont Bay Area Employment Distribution Jobs per acre within 1/2 mile from regional transit 1 to 5 6 to 25 26 to 100 101 and above Detail of South Bay and San Jose Jobs per acre more than 1/2 mile from regional transit 1 to 5 6 to 25 26 to 100 101 and above Despite the historic urban form of the South Bay, where Caltrain stations connect existing walkable downtowns, most of the Silicon Valley’s highest employment densities (other than downtown Palo Alto) are not in these station areas. In many cases, the half- mile ring around these stations includes areas with fewer than 5 jobs per acre. Further, most planning policy has focused on putting additional housing, not jobs, in these station areas. The station areas with the higher densities tend to be contiguous with other employment areas, such as Santa Clara Station and Sunnyvale‘s Lawrence Station. At the same time, the high-density employment areas in Silicon Valley are located in a relatively contained areas – such as around Stanford University and Research Park, around Google in Mountain View, and throughout North San Jose. The Urban Future of Work Miles 0 1 2 3 4 5 Downtown San Jose Santa Clara Milpitas Stanford Palo Alto Menlo Park Mountain View Google Campus Cupertino Sunnyvale Fremont Bay Area Employment Distribution Location Number of Jobs Percentage Average Gross Jobs Regional Total of Density (jobs/acre)* Within 1/2 mile of regional transit 873,718 23% 45 More than 1/2 mile from regional transit 2,866,133 77% 20 Jobs per acre within 1/2 mile from regional transit 1 to 5 6 to 25 26 to 100 101 and above Detail of South Bay and San Jose * Includes census block groups with at least 1 job per acre Jobs per acre more than 1/2 mile from regional transit 1 to 5 6 to 25 26 to 100 101 and above Despite the historic urban form of the South Bay, where Caltrain stations connect existing walkable downtowns, most of the Silicon Valley’s highest employment densities (other than downtown Palo Alto) are not in these station areas. In many cases, the half- mile ring around these stations includes areas with fewer than 5 jobs per acre. Further, most planning policy has focused on putting additional housing, not jobs, in these station areas. The station areas with the higher densities tend to be contiguous with other employment areas, such as Santa Clara Station and Sunnyvale‘s Lawrence Station. At the same time, the high-density employment areas in Silicon Valley are located in a relatively contained areas – such as around Stanford University and Research Park, around Google in Mountain View, and throughout North San Jose. The Urban Future of Work Miles 0 1 2 3 4 5 Downtown San Jose Santa Clara Milpitas Stanford Palo Alto Menlo Park Mountain View Google Campus Cupertino Sunnyvale Fremont Bay Area Employment Density Detail of South Bay & San Jose 1 to 5 6 - 25 26 - 100 100 and above Jobs per acre within 1/2 mile of regional transit Jobs per acre more than 1/2 mile of regional transit 1 to 5 6 - 25 26 - 100 100 and above ©SPUR 2012
  4. WHERE WE WORK BUSINESS VS ‘SOCIAL’ DISTRICTS
  5. WHERE WE WORK BUSINESS VS ‘SOCIAL’ DISTRICTS
  6. NEW HEADQUARTERS FACEBOOK
  7. ownership experience hierarchy diversity privacy community NEW HEADQUARTERS FACEBOOK
  8. “For example, if 95% of an agency’s employees work at home or another location 3 days a week, the agency can achieve a 30% reduction in real estate and a 39% reduction in carbon footprint.” MOBILITY MANDATE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT denSity and uSe of SpaCe. currently, federal workplaces have a high percentage of dedicated, individual spaces like private offices and assigned workstations. Organizing the federal workplace around mobility would reduce the size and number of dedicated, individual spaces and allocate more space to shared activities that support collaborative work. conference rooms are examples of such collaborative space. Mobility also requires the creation of new space types, such as hoteling spaces, focus rooms, team rooms, and informal meeting rooms. These shifts lead to denser floorplates, reduced real estate, and higher utilization rates, while accommodating the same number of workers. assigned workstations private offices Conference rooms Before neWSPaceTYPeS reduCed SpaCe informal meeting rooms Hoteling Spaces focus rooms team rooms assigned workstations private offices Conference rooms After ©GSA Leveraging Mobility, Managing Place, 2012.
  9. 2013 “ALL HANDS ON DECK” HP CALLS FOR WORKERS TO RETURN TO OFFICE. 2006-2011 “WORKFORCE TRANSFORMATION PROGRAM” TO REDUCE REAL ESTATE AND INCREASE EFFICIENCIES. MOBILITY MANDATE HEWLETT PACKARD
  10. mobility vs. all on site economy efficiency choice collaboration culture control COMPARING TRENDS TRADITIONAL DRIVERS sustaining innovating
  11. experience over space choice over ownership variety over singularity COMPARING TRENDS COMMONALITIES mobility vs. all on site
  12. THIRD WAY FINDING PHYSICAL AND VIRTUAL WORK COMMUNITIES FOR A DISTRIBUTED TEAM ©SITELAB
  13. THIRD WAY
  14. WEWORK WeWork | Golden Gate San Francisco, CA WORK SPACES THAT CONNECT MULTIPLE ORGANIZATIONS ©WeWork
  15. WEWORK WeWork | Boston, MAWORK SPACES THAT FEEL LIKE HOME SPACES ©WeWork
  16. WEWORK WeWork | Chinatown Washington, DCWORK SPACES THAT FEEL LIKE HOME SPACES ©WeWork
  17. WHAT HAPPENS TO DOWNTOWN? “WORKPLACE AS A SERVICE”
  18. WHAT HAPPENS TO DOWNTOWN? PLANNING FOR NEW TRANSIT PATTERNS
  19. WHAT HAPPENS TO DOWNTOWN? ADAPTING BUILDINGS TO OTHER USES
  20. FOCUS MEET MEET SOCIALIZE HUDDLE HUDDLE NO MORE DOWNTOWNS?  WHAT DOES IT MEAN WHEN WE WORK “ANYWHERE”? LAURA CRESCIMANO www.sitelaburbanstudio.com @lcrescimano

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