Joints upper limb 2nd lecture10122010
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Joints upper limb 2nd lecture10122010 Joints upper limb 2nd lecture10122010 Presentation Transcript

  • ANATOMY
    ANATOMY
    By
    Dr. THAAER MOHAMMED DAHER ALSAAD
    M.B.Ch.B.(MBBS) F.I.B.M.S.(Ph.D.)
    SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY
    SENIOR LECTURER
    IMS MSU
  • A Lateral view
    B Medial view
    D Sagittal section
    C Anterior view of the interior of the joint.
    Right elbow joint
  • Elbow Joint
    Articulation:
    This occurs between the trochlea and capitulum of the humerus and the trochlear notch of the ulna and the head of the radius.
    The articular surfaces are covered with hyaline cartilage.
    Type:
    Synovial hinge joint
    Capsule:
    Anteriorly it is attached above to the humerus along the upper margins of the coronoid and radial fossae and to the front of the medial and lateral epicondyles and below to the margin of the coronoid process of the ulna and to the anular ligament, which surrounds the head of the radius.
    Posteriorly it is attached above to the margins of the olecranon fossa of the humerus and below to the upper margin and sides of the olecranon process of the ulna and to the anular ligament.
  • Elbow Joint
    Synovial membrane:
    This lines the capsule and covers fatty pads in the floors of the coronoid, radial, and olecranon fossae;
    it is continuous below with the synovial membrane of the proximal radioulnar joint.
    Nerve supply:
    Branches from the median, ulnar,musculocutaneous, andradialnerves.
  • Elbow JointLigaments:
    • The lateral ligament;
    is triangular and is attached by its apex to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and by its base to the upper margin of the anular ligament.
    • The medial ligament;
    • is also triangular and consists principally of three strong bands:
    the anterior band,
    which passes from the medial epicondyle of the humerus to the medial margin of the coronoid process;
    the posterior band,
    which passes from the medial epicondyle of the humerus to the medial side of the olecranon;
    the transverse band,
    which passes between the ulnar attachments of the two preceding bands.
  • Elbow JointMovements
    The elbow joint is capable of flexion and extension.
    Flexion;
    is limited by the anterior surfaces of the forearm and arm coming into contact.
    Extension;
    is checked by the tension of the anterior ligament and the brachialis muscle.
    Flexion is performed by;
    the brachialis, biceps brachii, brachioradialis, and pronator teres muscles.
    Extension is performed by ;
    the triceps and anconeus muscles.
    It should be noted that the long axis of the extended forearm lies at an angle to the long axis of the arm.
    This angle, which opens laterally, is called the carrying angle and is about 170° in the male and 167° in the female.
    The angle disappears when the elbow joint is fully flexed.
  • Elbow JointImportant Relations
    Anteriorly:
    The brachialis, the tendon of the biceps, the median nerve, and the brachial artery.
    Posteriorly:
    The triceps muscle, a small bursa intervening.
    Medially:
    The ulnar nerve passes behind the medial epicondyle and crosses the medial ligament of the joint.
    Laterally:
    The common extensor tendon and the supinator.
  • Elbow JointClinical Notes
    Stability of Elbow Joint
    The elbow joint is stable because of the wrench-shaped articular surface of the olecranon and the pulley-shaped trochlea of the humerus;
    it also has strong medial and lateral ligaments. When examining the elbow joint, the physician must remember the normal relations of the bony points. In extension, the medial and lateral epicondyles and the top of the olecranon process are in a straight line; in flexion, the bony points form the boundaries of an equilateral triangle.
    Dislocations of the Elbow Joint
    Elbow dislocations are common, and most are posterior.
    Posterior dislocation usually follows falling on the outstretched hand.
    Posterior dislocations of the joint are common in children because the parts of the bones that stabilize the joint are incompletely developed.
    Avulsion of the epiphysis of the medial epicondyle is also common in childhood because then the medial ligament is much stronger than the bond of union between the epiphysis and the diaphysis.
  • Elbow JointClinical Notes
    Arthrocentesis of the Elbow Joint
    The anterior and posterior walls of the capsule are weak, and when the joint is distended with fluid, the posterior aspect of the joint becomes swollen.
    Aspiration of joint fluid can easily be performed through the back of the joint on either side of the olecranon process.
    Damage to the Ulnar Nerve With Elbow Joint Injuries
    The close relationship of the ulnar nerve to the medial side of the joint often results in its becoming damaged in dislocations of the joint or in fracture dislocations in this region.
    The nerve lesion can occur at the time of injury or weeks, months, or years later.
    The nerve can be involved in scar tissue formation or can become stretched owing to lateral deviation of the forearm in a badly reduced supracondylar fracture of the humerus. During movements of the elbow joint, the continued friction between the medial epicondyle and the stretched ulnar nerve eventually results in ulnar palsy.
    Radiology of the Elbow Region after Injury
    In examining lateral radiographs of the elbow region, it is important to remember that the lower end of the humerus is normally angulated forward 45° on the shaft;
    when examining a patient, the physician should see that the medial epicondyle, in the anatomic position, is directed medially and posteriorly and faces in the same direction as the head of the humerus.@@@@@@@@@@@@@
  • Proximal Radioulnar Joint
    Articulation:
    Between the circumference of the head of the radius and the anular ligament and the radial notch on the ulna.
    Type:
    Synovial pivot joint
    Capsule:
    The capsule encloses the joint and is continuous with that of the elbow joint.
    Ligament:
    The anular ligament is attached to the anterior and posterior margins of the radial notch on the ulna and forms a collar around the head of the radius.
    It is continuous above with the capsule of the elbow joint.
    It is not attached to the radius.
    Synovial membrane:
    This is continuous above with that of the elbow joint.
    Below it is attached to the inferior margin of the articular surface of the radius and the lower margin of the radial notch of the ulna.
    Nerve supply:
    Branches of the median, ulnar, musculocutaneous, and radial nerves
  • Proximal Radioulnar Joint
    • Movements:
    Pronation and supination of the forearm.
    • Important Relations
    Anteriorly:
    Supinator muscle and the radial nerve.
    Posteriorly:
    Supinator muscle and the common extensor tendon.
  • Relative positions of the radius and ulna when the forearm is fully pronated
  • Distal Radioulnar Joint
    Articulation:
    Between the rounded head of the ulna and the ulnar notch on the radius.
    Type:
    Synovial pivot joint
    Capsule:
    The capsule encloses the joint but is deficient superiorly.
    Ligaments:
    Weak anterior and posterior ligaments strengthen the capsule.
    Articular disc:
    This is triangular and composed of fibrocartilage.
    It is attached by its apex to the lateral side of the base of the styloid process of the ulna and by its base to the lower border of the ulnar notch of the radius.
    It shuts off the distal radioulnar joint from the wrist and strongly unites the radius to the ulna.
    Synovial membrane:
    This lines the capsule passing from the edge of one articular surface to that of the other.
    Nerve supply:
    Anterior interosseous nerve (branch of the median nerve),
    The deep branch of the radial nerve.
  • Distal Radioulnar JointMovements
    The movements of pronation and supination of the forearm involve a rotary movement around a vertical axis at the proximal and distal radioulnar joints.
    The axis passes through the head of the radius above and the attachment of the apex of the triangular articular disc below.
    In the movement of pronation, the head of the radius rotates within the anular ligament, whereas the distal end of the radius with the hand moves bodily forward, the ulnar notch of the radius moving around the circumference of the head of the ulna.
    In addition, the distal end of the ulna moves laterally so that the hand remains in line with the upper limb and is not displaced medially. This movement of the ulna is important when using an instrument such as a screwdriver because it prevents side-to-side movement of the hand during the repetitive movements of supination and pronation.
    Pronation is performed by the pronator teres and the pronator quadratus.
    Supination is performed by the biceps brachii and the supinator.
    Supination is the more powerful of the two movements because of the strength of the biceps muscle.
    Because supination is the more powerful movement, screw threads and the spiral of corkscrews are made so that the screw and corkscrews are driven inward by the movement of supination in right-handed people.
  • Distal Radioulnar Joint
    Important Relations
    Anteriorly:
    The tendons of flexor digitorum profundus FDP
    Posteriorly:
    The tendon of extensor digiti minimi EDM
  • Clinical NotesRadioulnar Joint Disease
    The proximal radioulnar joint communicates with the elbow joint,
    The distal radioulnar joint does not communicate with the wrist joint.
    In practical terms, this means that infection of the elbow joint invariably involves the proximal radioulnar joint.
    The strength of the proximal radioulnar joint depends on the integrity of the strong anular ligament.
    Rupture of this ligament occurs in cases of anterior dislocation of the head of the radius on the capitulum of the humerus.
    In young children, in whom the head of the radius is still small and undeveloped, a sudden jerk on the arm can pull the radial head down through the anular ligament.
    @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
  • Wrist Joint (Radiocarpal Joint)
    Articulation:
    Between the distal end of the radius and the articular disc above and the scaphoid, lunate, and triquetral bones below.
    Type:
    Synovial ellipsoid joint
    Capsule:
    The capsule encloses the joint and is attached above to the distal ends of the radius and ulna and below to the proximal row of carpal bones.
    Ligaments:
    Anterior and posterior ligaments strengthen the capsule.
    The medial ligament is attached to the styloid process of the ulna and to the triquetral bone.
    The lateral ligament is attached to the styloid process of the radius and to the scaphoid bone.
    Synovial membrane:
    This lines the capsule and is attached to the margins of the articular surfaces.
    The joint cavity does not communicate with that of the distal radioulnar joint or with the joint cavities of the intercarpal joints.
    Nerve supply:
    Anterior interosseous nerve and the deep branch of the radial nerve.
  • Wrist JointMovements
    The following movements are possible: flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and circumduction.
    Rotation is not possible because the articular surfaces are ellipsoid shaped.
    The lack of rotation is compensated for by the movements of pronation and supination of the forearm.
    Flexion is performed by the flexor carpi radialis, the flexor carpi ulnaris, and the palmaris longus.
    These muscles are assisted by the flexor digitorum superficialis, the flexor digitorum profundus, and the flexor pollicis longus.
    Extension is performed by the extensor carpi radialis longus, the extensor carpi radialis brevis, and the extensor carpi ulnaris.
    These muscles are assisted by the extensor digitorum, the extensor indicis, the extensor digiti minimi, and the extensor pollicis longus.
    Abduction is performed by the flexor carpi radialis and the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis.
    These muscles are assisted by the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus and brevis.
    Adduction is performed by the flexor and extensor carpi ulnaris.
  • Wrist JointImportant Relations
    Anteriorly:
    The tendons of the flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis, the flexor pollicis longus, the flexor carpi radialis, the flexor carpi ulnaris, and the median and ulnar nerves.
    Posteriorly:
    The tendons of the extensor carpi ulnaris, the extensor digiti minimi, the extensor digitorum, the extensor indicis, the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis, the extensor pollicis longus and brevis, and the abductor pollicis longus.
    Medially:
    The posterior cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve.
    Laterally:
    The radial artery.
  • Clinical Notes
    Wrist Joint Injuries
    Because the styloid process of the radius is longer than that of the ulna, abduction of the wrist joint is less extensive than adduction.
    In flexion extension movements, the hand can be flexed about 80° but extended to only about 45°. The range of flexion is increased by movement at the midcarpal joint.
    A fall on the outstretched hand can strain the anterior ligament of the wrist joint, producing synovial effusion, joint pain, and limitation of movement. These symptoms and signs must not be confused with those produced by a fractured scaphoid or dislocation of the lunate bone, which are similar.
    Falls on the Outstretched Hand
    In falls on the outstretched hand, forces are transmitted from the scaphoid to the distal end of the radius, from the radius across the interosseous membrane to the ulna, and from the ulna to the humerus; thence, through the glenoid fossa of the scapula to the coracoclavicular ligament and the clavicle; and finally, to the sternum.
    If the forces are excessive, different parts of the upper limb give way under the strain. The area affected seems to be related to age. In a young child, for example, there may be a posterior displacement of the distal radial epiphysis; in the teenager the clavicle might fracture; in the young adult the scaphoid is commonly fractured; and in the elderly the distal end of the radius is fractured about 1 in. (2.5 cm) proximal to the wrist joint (Colles' fracture).@@@@
  • Fractures of the distal end of the radius.
    A Colles' fracture.
    B Smith's fracture @@@@@@@@
  • Joints of the Hand and Fingers
  • Intercarpal Joints
    Articulation:
    Between the individual bones of the proximal row of the carpus;
    Between the individual bones of the distal row of the carpus;
    Midcarpal joint, between the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones.
    Type:
    Synovial plane joints
    Capsule:
    The capsule surrounds each joint.
    Ligaments:
    The bones are united by strong anterior, posterior, and interosseous ligaments.
    Synovial membrane:
    This lines the capsule and is attached to the margins of the articular surfaces. The joint cavity of the midcarpal joint extends not only between the two rows of carpal bones but also upward between the individual bones forming the proximal row and downward between the bones of the distal row.
    Nerve supply:
    Anterior interosseous nerve,
    Deep branch of the radial nerve,
    Deep branch of the ulnar nerve
    Movements
    A small amount of gliding movement is possible.
  • Carpometacarpal and Intermetacarpal Joints
    The carpometacarpal and intermetacarpal joints are synovial plane joints possessing anterior, posterior, and interosseous ligaments.
    They have a common joint cavity.
    A small amount of gliding movement is possible.
  • Carpometacarpal Joint of the Thumb
    Articulation:
    Between the trapezium and the saddle-shaped base of the first metacarpal bone.
    Type:
    Synovial saddle-shaped joint
    Capsule:
    The capsule surrounds the joint.
    Synovial membrane:
    This lines the capsule and forms a separate joint cavity.
  • Movements
    The following movements are possible:
    Flexion:
    Flexor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis.
    Extension:
    Extensor pollicis longus and brevis.
    Abduction:
    Abductor pollicis longus and brevis.
    Adduction:
    Adductor pollicis
    Rotation (opposition):
    The thumb is rotated medially by the opponens pollicis.
  • Metacarpophalangeal Joints
    Articulation:
    Between the heads of the metacarpal bones and the bases of the proximal phalanges.
    Type:
    Synovial condyloid joints
    Capsule:
    The capsule surrounds the joint.
    Ligaments:
    The palmar ligamentsare strong and contain some fibrocartilage.
    They are firmly attached to the phalanx but less so to the metacarpal bone.
    The palmar ligaments of the second, third, fourth, and fifth joints are united by the deep transverse metacarpal ligaments, which hold the heads of the metacarpal bones together.
    The collateral ligaments are cordlike bands present on each side of the joints.
    Each passes downward and forward from the head of the metacarpal bone to the base of the phalanx.
    The collateral ligaments are taut when the joint is in flexion and lax when the joint is in extension.
    Synovial membrane:
    This lines the capsule and is attached to the margins of the articular surfaces.
  • Movements
    The following movements are possible:
    Flexion:
    The lumbricals and the interossei, assisted by the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus
    Extension:
    Extensor digitorum, extensor indicis, and extensor digiti minimi
    Abduction:
    Movement away from the midline of the third finger is performed by the dorsal interossei.
    Adduction:
    Movement toward the midline of the third finger is performed by the palmar interossei.
    In the case of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, flexion is performed by the flexor pollicis longus and brevis and extension is performed by the extensor pollicis longus and brevis. The movements of abduction and adduction are performed at the carpometacarpal joint.
  • Interphalangeal Joints
    Interphalangeal joints are synovial hinge joints that have a structure similar to that of the metacarpophalangeal joints.
  • The Hand as a Functional Unit
    The upper limb is a multijointed lever freely movable on the trunk at the shoulder joint.
    At the distal end of the upper limb is the important prehensile organ the hand.
    Much of the importance of the hand depends on the pincer action of the thumb, which enables one to grasp objects between the thumb and index finger.
    The extreme mobility of the first metacarpal bone makes the thumb functionally as important as all the remaining fingers combined.
  • Movements of the Thumb
    Flexion is the movement of the thumb across the palm in such a manner as to maintain the plane of the thumbnail at right angles to the plane of the other fingernails .
    The movement takes place between the trapezium and the first metacarpal bone, at the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints.
    The muscles producing the movement are the flexor pollicis longus and brevis and the opponens pollicis.
    Extension is the movement of the thumb in a lateral or coronal plane away from the palm in such a manner as to maintain the plane of the thumbnail at right angles to the plane of the other fingernails.
    The movement takes place between the trapezium and the first metacarpal bone, at the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints.
    The muscles producing the movement are the extensor pollicis longus and brevis.
    Abduction is the movement of the thumb in an anteroposterior plane away from the palm, the plane of the thumbnail being kept at right angles to the plane of the other nails.
    The movement takes place mainly between the trapezium and the first metacarpal bone; a small amount of movement takes place at the metacarpophalangeal joint.
    The muscles producing the movement are the abductor pollicis longus and brevis.
  • Movements of the Thumb
    Adduction is the movement of the thumb in an anteroposterior plane toward the palm, the plane of the thumbnail being kept at right angles to the plane of the other fingernails.
    The movement takes place between the trapezium and the first metacarpal bone.
    The muscle producing the movement is the adductor pollicis.
    Opposition is the movement of the thumb across the palm in such a manner that the anterior surface of the tip comes into contact with the anterior surface of the tip of any of the other fingers.
    The movement is accomplished by the medial rotation of the first metacarpal bone and the attached phalanges on the trapezium.
    The plane of the thumbnail comes to lie parallel with the plane of the nail of the opposed finger.
    The muscle producing the movement is the opponens pollicis.
  • Position of the Hand
    For the hand to be able to perform delicate movements, such as those used in the holding of small instruments in watch repairing, the forearm is placed in the semiprone position and the wrist joint is partially extended.
    With the wrist partially extended, the long flexor and extensor tendons of the fingers are working to their best mechanical advantage; at the same time, the flexors and extensors of the carpus can exert a balanced fixator action on the wrist joint, ensuring a stable base for the movements of the fingers.
    The position of rest is the posture adopted by the hand when the fingers are at rest and the hand is relaxed. The forearm is in the semiprone position; the wrist joint is slightly extended; the second, third, fourth, and fifth fingers are partially flexed, although the index finger is not flexed as much as the others; and the plane of the thumbnail lies at a right angle to the plane of the other fingernails.
    The position of function is the posture adopted by the hand when it is about to grasp an object between the thumb and index finger. The forearm is in the semiprone position, the wrist joint is partially extended (more so than in the position of rest), and the fingers are partially flexed, the index finger being flexed as much as the others. The metacarpal bone of the thumb is rotated in such a manner that the plane of the thumbnail lies parallel with that of the index finger, and the pulp of the thumb and index finger are in contact.
  • Movements of the Index, Middle, Ring, and Little Fingers
    Flexion is the movement forward of the finger in an anteroposterior plane.
    The movement takes place at the interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints.
    The distal phalanx is flexed by the flexor digitorum profundus, the middle phalanx by the flexor digitorum superficialis, and the proximal phalanx by the lumbricals and the interossei.
    Extension is the movement backward of the finger in an anteroposterior plane.
    The movements take place at the interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints.
    The distal phalanx is extended by the lumbricals and interossei, the middle phalanx by the lumbricals and interossei, and the proximal phalanx by the extensor digitorum (in addition, by the extensor indicis for the index finger and the extensor digiti minimi for the little finger).
    Abduction is the movement of the fingers (including the middle finger) away from the imaginary midline of the middle finger.
    The movement takes place at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The muscles producing the movement are the dorsal interossei; the abductor digiti minimi abducts the little finger.
    Adduction is the movement of the fingers toward the midline of the middle finger.
    The movement takes place at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The muscles producing the movement are the palmar interossei.
    Abduction and adduction of the fingers are possible only in the extended position.
    In the flexed position of the finger, the articular surface of the base of the proximal phalanx lies in contact with the flattened anterior surface of the head of the metacarpal bone. The two bones are held in close contact by the collateral ligaments, which are taut in this position.
    In the extended position of the metacarpophalangeal joint, the base of the phalanx is in contact with the rounded part of the metacarpal head, and the collateral ligaments are slack.
  • Cupping the Hand
    In the cupped position, the palm of the hand is formed into a deep concavity.
    To achieve this, the thumb is abducted and placed in a partially opposed position and is also slightly flexed. This has the effect of drawing the thenar eminence forward.
    The fourth and fifth metacarpal bones are flexed and slightly rotated at the carpometacarpal joints. This has the effect of drawing the hypothenar eminence forward.
    The palmaris brevis muscle contracts and pulls the skin over the hypothenar eminence medially; it also puckers the skin, which improves the gripping ability of the palm.
    The index, middle, ring, and little fingers are partially flexed; the fingers are also rotated slightly at the metacarpophalangeal joints to increase the general concavity of the cupped hand.
  • Making a Fist(Try to make a strong fist with the wrist joint flexed, it is very difficult.)
    Making a fist is accomplished by flexing the metacarpophalangeal joints and the interphalangeal joints of the fingers and thumb.
    It is performed by the contraction of the long flexor muscles of the fingers and thumb.
    For this movement to be carried out efficiently a synergic contraction of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis and the extensor carpi ulnaris muscles must occur to extend the wrist joint.
  • Thank you