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A presentation from 2007 for The Minnesota Daily staff that talks about how photographers and reporters work together.

A presentation from 2007 for The Minnesota Daily staff that talks about how photographers and reporters work together.

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Transcript

  • 1. Reporters and photogs: the best reportage
    By Vadim and Stacy
  • 2. Two trades…one goal
    Though reporters and photogs have different skills, we are all journalists and are here to get the best story and best product in our newspaper.
    One is not superior over another: so don’t say, “My photographer.” This is a team.
    If a photo is great, it strengthens the story with a visual element. It gives the reader something they can’t get in the text.
    If the story is great, it adds to the quality of the photo. Both complement one another.
  • 3. Improving Partnership
    Though we are a team, we often need different things to get our jobs done (reporter might need a one-on-one interview, while a photog needs a photo of event).
    New Policy: Reporters will have to attend at least one photo meeting this semester: Thursday nights (they’re fun).
    Budget requests for photos: details- when, where, who to contact.
    Respect one another’s needs-communication is key! Call your photog after they are assigned (check the budget on Friday). Photogs call reporters.
    Breaking news: call a photog ASAP.
    Story ideas: Reporters can pitch photo essays to photogs and photogs can pitch story ideas to reporters. We are all journalists.
  • 4. Think Visually
    Each story can benefit from a visual element.
    If a story seems dry, without any obvious visual elements (ex. New law being passed), think of a visual illustration that could tell the story.
    Reporters, if you don’t have ideas, go to a photog and brainstorm. They will most likely help you out.
    Examples…
  • 5. Working together
    Question of the Week- photog: opportunity for great profile. Reporter: opportunity to gain a valuable source.
    Projects-this can be in-depth stories, photo essays, investigative stories, etc.
    Beat Stories: If it is an event, go together!
    Breaking News: Double-duo. You are a team, work together to cover the angles of the breaking news story.
    Day Desking: communication, contact the photog assigned as soon as you know what the story is and update it on the budget.
  • 6. Professionalism
    It’s okay to have fun, but don’t lose sight of our goal to get the best stories and photos.
    News outlets take us seriously: AP picking up stories.
    We are student professionals
    Your name is on it!
  • 7. Projects
    Stories: in-depth features, investigative reporting, Computer Assisted Reporting stories, stories that go much beyond the surface.
    Things to consider: Does the subject affect many students? Is it provocative? How would the story serve our readers? What are the visual elements? What numbers can I get to back up the story?
    Benefits: great clip, awards, opportunity to work with photographer for an extended time, build sources, gain new story ideas, learn more about your beat, focus on one topic, become an expert, improve the paper!
    Examples
  • 8. Project: Process
    1. Pitch story idea to your editor.
    2. Brainstorm and outline basic angles to your story.
    3. Set up a meeting with projects editor, managing editor, EIC, visual editor, photo editor and multimedia editor.
    4. Draft outline and deadline schedule for project storywith projects editor.
    5. 1-2 weeks of reporting and writing. A projects desk intern takes over your beat. Continually update the projects editor and/or managing editor on your progress.
    6. After reporting and writing is complete, meet with editors again to cover any holes and final angles of the story.
    7. Edit and print
  • 9. The End
    Ideas, more?
    Questions, comments?