0
Dream tracking
and lucid dream training
QS Brussels Meetup
January 2014
Laurens Van Keer
Lucid
DreamingDreaming while knowing that
you are dreaming
Why
dreams?
What are dreams?
Random by-product
or
Selective simulation?
An
evolutionary
hypothesis
for the function of dreams
!!!!!
!!!!
!!!!
!!!!!
Lucid dreams
to enhance
psychological
development
✓ Nightmare
treatment
✓ Mental rehearsal
✓ Creative
problem-
solving
Relation to sleep
tracking
Back to basics
Retrospective
memory
Prospective
memory
Testing dream journals
Dream journalling
silver bullet?
Research participants
wanted!
www.dreamresearch.be
ReferencesKahan, T. L., & LaBerge, S. P. (2011). Dreaming and waking: Similarities and differences revisited.
Consciousnes...
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking

75

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
75
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • "a simulator", that is not that different in the view of how today's scientist look at the possible psychological advantages of dreaming: simulating waking reality = threat simulation. Reasoning from the evolutionary theory that dreams help us with adapting to our changing (social ( waking life circumstances, we could use lucid dreams and the right mental training and coaching to be much more effective
  • That our ordinary REM sleep dreams might have served as a "simulator" too by simulating our waking life threats in order for us to re-enforce the appropriate mental and emotional schemas, scripts and expectations that enable us to, either consciously or unconsciously more effectively behave/survive when that threat re-occurs some other time and place in waking life.
    If we fast-forward to today's time...
  • ... most of us do not spend a lot of time fearing dangerous bears by day, now we mostly dream about social threats, like angry bosses, colleagues, family members or friends. Our current "threats" have naturally evolved with our changing life circumstances.
    If the psychological function of dreams would indeed by that of threat simulation, lucid dreaming by specifically applied as a practice to consciously and deliberately enhance that function.
  • I am a lucid dream researcher, providing lucid dream training around the world to educate and inspire people from many backgrounds on the topic...
  • Discovered from subjective dream reports immediately after awakening, that dream eyes follow real eyes. Perhaps in use of verifying lucid dreams?
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • "a simulator", that is not that different in the view of how today's scientist look at the possible psychological advantages of dreaming: simulating waking reality = threat simulation. Reasoning from the evolutionary theory that dreams help us with adapting to our changing (social ( waking life circumstances, we could use lucid dreams and the right mental training and coaching to be much more effective
  • "a simulator", that is not that different in the view of how today's scientist look at the possible psychological advantages of dreaming: simulating waking reality = threat simulation. Reasoning from the evolutionary theory that dreams help us with adapting to our changing (social ( waking life circumstances, we could use lucid dreams and the right mental training and coaching to be much more effective
  • "a simulator", that is not that different in the view of how today's scientist look at the possible psychological advantages of dreaming: simulating waking reality = threat simulation. Reasoning from the evolutionary theory that dreams help us with adapting to our changing (social ( waking life circumstances, we could use lucid dreams and the right mental training and coaching to be much more effective
  • "a simulator", that is not that different in the view of how today's scientist look at the possible psychological advantages of dreaming: simulating waking reality = threat simulation. Reasoning from the evolutionary theory that dreams help us with adapting to our changing (social ( waking life circumstances, we could use lucid dreams and the right mental training and coaching to be much more effective
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • As a 7-year old kid, I had no idea that dreams in which you know that you are dreaming are scientifically referred to as "lucid dreams"
  • Transcript of "QS Brussels meetup January 2014 - Lucid Dreaming and Dream Tracking"

    1. 1. Dream tracking and lucid dream training QS Brussels Meetup January 2014 Laurens Van Keer
    2. 2. Lucid DreamingDreaming while knowing that you are dreaming
    3. 3. Why dreams?
    4. 4. What are dreams? Random by-product or Selective simulation?
    5. 5. An evolutionary hypothesis for the function of dreams
    6. 6. !!!!! !!!!
    7. 7. !!!! !!!!!
    8. 8. Lucid dreams to enhance psychological development ✓ Nightmare treatment ✓ Mental rehearsal ✓ Creative problem- solving
    9. 9. Relation to sleep tracking
    10. 10. Back to basics Retrospective memory Prospective memory
    11. 11. Testing dream journals
    12. 12. Dream journalling silver bullet?
    13. 13. Research participants wanted! www.dreamresearch.be
    14. 14. ReferencesKahan, T. L., & LaBerge, S. P. (2011). Dreaming and waking: Similarities and differences revisited. Consciousness and cognition, 20(3), 494–514. LaBerge, Stephen P. "Lucid dreaming as a learnable skill: A case study." Perceptual and Motor Skills 51.3f (1980): 1039-1042. APA LaBerge, S., & Zimbardo, P. G. (2000). Smooth tracking eye-movements discriminate both dreaming and perception from imagination. In toward a science of consciousness conference, Tucson, April (pp. 10–15). Nielsen, T. A. (2000). A review of mentation in REM and NREM sleep: “covert” REM sleep as a possible reconciliation of two opposing models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 23(6), 851–866. Revonsuo, Antti. "The reinterpretation of dreams: An evolutionary hypothesis of the function of dreaming." Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23.6 (2000): 877-901. Spoormaker, Victor I., and Jan van den Bout. "Lucid dreaming treatment for nightmares: a pilot study." Psychotherapy and psychosomatics 75.6 (2006): 389-394. Stumbrys, T., Erlacher, D., Schädlich, M., & Schredl, M. (2012). Induction of lucid dreams: A systematic review of evidence. Consciousness and Cognition, 21(3), 1456–1475.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×