Critical Analysis   The Wives of Bath , by Susan Swan  pg 91-237 Lost and Delirious , directed by Lea Pool,  screen play b...
Handout includes : <ul><li>Drinking Game </li></ul><ul><li>Author background </li></ul><ul><li>Frequently Asked Questions ...
Author Background <ul><li>Susan Swan is a Canadian novelist and journalist, the author of 6 books, who has been published ...
Novel Background <ul><li>The story takes place at Baths Ladies College in the 60’s. The narrator (Mouse) discusses the con...
Critical Analysis of the Novel   <ul><li>We each have our perspective on ‘Point’. Here is Jocelyne’s personal analysis fol...
Critical Analysis of the Film <ul><li>Period: 1990. Women have become more liberated </li></ul><ul><li>This is mostly a lo...
Adaptation –The Process <ul><li>Linda Hutcheon’s  A Theory of Adaptation . “Adaptation as a Process” (Course Reader, 18-9)...
Adaptation –The Process, cont. <ul><li>Question :  What other discrepancies between book and film can be noted?  </li></ul...
Adaptation – The Product <ul><li>This film opened up a many of questions regarding the process and the product of adaptati...
Adaptation – The Product, cont. <ul><li>In the handout “Frequently Asked Questions”, Susan Swan is quoted as saying, “I’d ...
Conclusion <ul><li>“  . . . art is derived from other art . . .” (Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Adaptation, 2) </li></ul><ul...
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Critical Analysis.Eng 103 The Wives Of Bath

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This is a review of the novel The Wives of Bath, and the film adaptation, Lost and Delirious.

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Critical Analysis.Eng 103 The Wives Of Bath

  1. 1. Critical Analysis The Wives of Bath , by Susan Swan pg 91-237 Lost and Delirious , directed by Lea Pool, screen play by Judith Thompson Presented by Charlene Clark Jocelyne Gregory Laurel Phillips
  2. 2. Handout includes : <ul><li>Drinking Game </li></ul><ul><li>Author background </li></ul><ul><li>Frequently Asked Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Most Popular 2001 adaptations of Novels to movies </li></ul>
  3. 3. Author Background <ul><li>Susan Swan is a Canadian novelist and journalist, the author of 6 books, who has been published in 20 countries. </li></ul><ul><li>She attended Havergal College in the 60’s and the story takes place around the same time period (Preface vii) </li></ul><ul><li>She is an associate professor of the Division of Humanities at York University. </li></ul><ul><li>Her most recent novel is titled “What Casanova Told Me.” </li></ul><ul><li>When once asked “What is the main message of the body of your work?” She answered, “I’d like to be remembered for creating powerful female characters who have the mythical force to endure and represent new ways of being female in the world.” (FAQ handout) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Novel Background <ul><li>The story takes place at Baths Ladies College in the 60’s. The narrator (Mouse) discusses the connection between the name of her school and Chaucer’s tale, The Wife of Bath, therefore referring to all her fellow students as the Wifes of Bath – hence the book title. </li></ul><ul><li>The story is built around an actual crime committed in 1978 (preface ix), “ I was inspired. . .” </li></ul><ul><li>The Author’s integrates her experience as a boarder at Havergal College (preface i). </li></ul><ul><li>The crime is not the focus of the novel. This would have made it crime fiction. Instead it is the ‘denouement’, or the outcome of a series of occurrences. </li></ul><ul><li>In the Author’s words, it is a “Gothic parable about penis envy.” (FAQ Sheet). </li></ul>
  5. 5. Critical Analysis of the Novel <ul><li>We each have our perspective on ‘Point’. Here is Jocelyne’s personal analysis followed by Charlene’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Period: 1960’s during a time of cultural transition (preface I). Women wanted step up into more powerful social statuses. </li></ul><ul><li>Freud: Penis Envy and Castration complex Pg 114 (Paulina trial Dr. assessing her as insane stating she has penis envy) </li></ul><ul><li>Betty Freidan: Feminine Mystique. For women to become powerful, they have to give up their femininity. </li></ul><ul><li>Perhaps the author was exposed to these “old school’ thoughts regarding the “feminine mystique”. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Critical Analysis of the Film <ul><li>Period: 1990. Women have become more liberated </li></ul><ul><li>This is mostly a love story with some lingering, repressive cultural norms regarding female sexuality and power. These norms inhibit the free expression and acceptance of love. </li></ul><ul><li>The girls feelings about their femininity and their mothers are reflected in the letters read in the movie. </li></ul><ul><li>As in Lady Macbeth, Paulie wants to abandon her femininity and step up to a position of power (masculine) that will enable her to win her love. In the film they use Lady Macbeth to denote Freud’s penis envy. “Unsex me here . . .” </li></ul><ul><li>Film clip </li></ul>
  7. 7. Adaptation –The Process <ul><li>Linda Hutcheon’s A Theory of Adaptation . “Adaptation as a Process” (Course Reader, 18-9). </li></ul><ul><li>Swan notes the following changes to her story in the process of adaptation: </li></ul><ul><li>“ I suspected the producers of watering down the story for commercial reasons” (preface ix) </li></ul><ul><li>“ I found out late in the production that Pool had left out the novel’s ending.” (ix) </li></ul><ul><li>We see a drastically altered ending from the one expressed in the novel </li></ul><ul><li>Does the new ending change the message? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Adaptation –The Process, cont. <ul><li>Question : What other discrepancies between book and film can be noted? </li></ul><ul><li>For example: “Adult sexuality . . . is openly celebratory, unlike the alienated sex scenes in the novel which reflect the repressions of the early 1960s . . .” (preface iix) </li></ul><ul><li>Or, The falcon in the movie replaces Kong’s tests of masculinity, “mastery over nature, other men and women” p. 92 in the novel. The falcon eats mice (Mouse?), Perhaps Mouse (Mary B’s) feeding the mice to the Falcon represents the death of a weak, feminine Mary B. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What was left in or taken out, lost or added during the process? What other significant changes, meaning, symbolisms occurred in the transposition. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Adaptation – The Product <ul><li>This film opened up a many of questions regarding the process and the product of adaptation. </li></ul><ul><li>Linda Hutcheon writes in The Theory of Adaptation that it is “. . . the spirit of the work or an artist that has to be captured and conveyed in the adaptation for it to be a success.” (Course Reader, 10). It is “repetition without replication.” (7). She says also, “Themes are perhaps the easiest story elements to see as adaptable across media . . .” (10) </li></ul><ul><li>Question: With so many differences noted between novel and adaptation into a feature film, what remained as the “spirit” or theme that exists independent of both. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Adaptation – The Product, cont. <ul><li>In the handout “Frequently Asked Questions”, Susan Swan is quoted as saying, “I’d like to be remembered for creating powerful female characters who have the mythic force to endure and represent new ways of being female in the world” </li></ul><ul><li>Question: Do you think that the main character(s) portrayed in Lost and Delirious remained true to the author’s statement above? </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptation side note: The novel has been made into a movie, a drinking game, several music videos and, somewhere, an internet role playing game. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Conclusion <ul><li>“ . . . art is derived from other art . . .” (Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Adaptation, 2) </li></ul><ul><li>This film opened up a many of questions regarding the process and the product of adaptation. </li></ul><ul><li>We have looked critically at both the novel and the film. </li></ul><ul><li>What was the point of the novel – what was the author trying to convey to the reader. </li></ul><ul><li>Was the film a successful adaptation in that it aptly conveyed the “spirit” or theme of the novel. </li></ul><ul><li>In your handout you’ll find a list of adaptation to spark thought about the range of adaptive possibilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Any last critical reviews of the film. Likes and dislikes. </li></ul>

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